Recent Stories

Two UofSC professors named American Chemical Society Fellows

July 28, 2016, Augusta Bauknight

The American Chemical Society (ACS) has named University of South Carolina professors Scott R. Goode and Susan D. Richardson 2016 ACS Fellows. Goode and Richardson, faculty in the department of chemistry and biochemistry, are among 57 national fellows chosen for their exceptional accomplishments in chemistry and service to the ACS community.

faye jeffcoat

Remembering Big Abb, Little Abb

July 27, 2016, Page Ivey

Faye Jeffcoat is a Gamecock by marriage and motherhood, but there is no doubt her blood runs garnet. A native of Newberry, S.C., who was an English major at Newberry College, Jeffcoat says her family was evenly split between University of South Carolina and Clemson grads — that is until she met and married Abb Jeffcoat Jr. After that, it was all Carolina, all the time.

Rewarding efforts

July 21, 2016, Adena Rice

Students usually prefer to avoid the executive director of Student Conduct and Academic Integrity, Alisa Liggett. But students from her University 101 classes, the university’s first-year student seminars, decided instead to nominate Liggett for the 2015 M. Stuart Hunter Award for Outstanding Teaching in University 101 that she later was awarded.

Igor Roninson

Breakthrough Leadership in Research

July 21, 2016, Steven Powell

Igor Roninson brought 10 scientists and Senex Biotechnology, a cancer drug discovery company, to USC in 2011 when he was named the new SmartState Endowed Chair in Translational Cancer Therapeutics. But the South Carolina College of Pharmacy professor, who was named a Breakthrough Leadership in Research awardee by the Office of the Vice President for Research, was just getting started in building infrastructure that would enhance cancer research throughout the state.

eboni nelson

Engineering equality

July 18, 2016

The legal profession has been called one of the least diverse in the country. And while countless attempts have been made within the legal industry to ameliorate the problem, University of South Carolina School of Law professor Eboni Nelson believes the key to real change starts with law schools.

Greg Gomez

The human factor in allergy research

July 15, 2016, Steven Powell

When starting his career as an independent scientist studying allergies and asthma, Greg Gomez shifted his laboratory focus from animal models to human tissue. The transition helped the School of Medicine researcher uncover a surprising effect that a common heart medication has on mast cells, which are key components of the allergic response.

4k for cancer

Pair of Gamecocks run across country to raise money for cancer victims

July 12, 2016, John Brunelli

Running while helping others proved to be the perfect combination for how two Gamecocks are spending their summer. Bailey Wilhelm and Jack Bowling are part of the Ulman Cancer Fund's 4K for Cancer. The pair are running the 4,000 miles from San Francisco to Baltimore to raise money to help young cancer victims pay for treatment.

buying a bride

Law professor explores history, future of mail-order marriages

July 11, 2016, Rob Schaller

“Without marriage, there could be no stable family units, no children, and no future. And without mail-order brides, one could argue, there might not be a United States of America. The entire colonial endeavor hinged on marriage,” says University of South Carolina law professor Marcia Yablon-Zug, whose new book, “Buying a Bride: An Engaging History of Mail-Order Matches,” traces the phenomenon as far back as our nation’s first permanent English settlement, Jamestown.

pillars

Pillars put students on the path to leadership

July 07, 2016, Augusta Bauknight

For Ross Lordo, the decision to attend the Pillars for Carolina orientation program before his freshman year set him on the path to success. Pillars for Carolina offers first-year students an opportunity to learn about the Carolina community, create friendships with future classmates, and participate in the university’s traditions while also learning about leadership skills and service.

Maksymilian Chruszcz

2016 Breakthrough Star Maksymilian Chruszcz

June 30, 2016, Steven Powell

As a structural biologist, Maksymilian Chruszcz is uniquely positioned to collaborate widely across the academy, and he’s made the most of that potential at Carolina. Since his arrival in 2012, the associate professor in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry has used his expertise in protein crystallography to develop collaborations with colleagues in chemistry and biochemistry, medicine, public health, biology and chemical engineering.

Chen Li

Grow with the flow

June 24, 2016, Steven Powell

Lasers, rail guns and space stations have unique engineering needs that Carolina research is serving. Joining the faculty of the College of Engineering and Computing in 2009, Chen Li founded the Micro/Nanoscale Transport Lab, which is a world leader in cutting-edge heat transfer and energy production research.

Allison Manuel

Targeting diabetes

June 17, 2016, Steven Powell

Working in Norma Frizzell’s laboratory in the School of Medicine, doctoral student Allison Manuel is getting down to brass tacks with a chronic disease that afflicts some 30 million Americans. Her research is resolving details of a detrimental cellular consequence of diabetes that was discovered here at the University of South Carolina: an indiscriminate modification of proteins that can overwhelm a cell’s ability to function properly.

The mechanisms of memory

June 15, 2016, Page Ivey

Michy Kelly’s fascination with how brains work began in high school when she noticed that she and her brother were polar opposites when it came to cognitive abilities. Finding the physical difference in brains that have an inability to consistently create new memories — or find old ones — is a key focus of her work, which earned her recognition as one of the University of South Carolina’s 2016 Breakthrough Stars.

costa rica

Carolina Core abroad

June 15, 2016, Adena Rice

Carolina Core classes traditionally stay within four walls at University of South Carolina. However a Maymester study abroad trip to Costa Rica not only taught the students about environmental science 101, but also expanded their knowledge beyond the textbook and into a personal understanding of the culture around them.

From left, Carolyn Morris, Christopher Church, Kristen Seay, Cynthia Flinn

Saving Elyse

June 14, 2016, Chris Horn

The Cold Case Project, an initiative in the Children’s Law Center, focuses on a select group of adolescents who have lingered in the S.C. foster system and are at risk for aging out of foster care without achieving legal permanency — that is, without a family. Partnering with DSS and the family courts, Cold Case staff find ways to reunite these at-risk foster children with responsible family members or to match them with a new family. With children’s lives at stake, giving up is not an option.

Sophie Keyes

Student puts disability access center stage

June 10, 2016, Erin Mikes

Broadcast journalism major Sophie Keyes will place the public need for greater disability access center stage when she competes in the Miss South Carolina pageant in late June. Inspired by her father’s work and her friend’s need for greater wheelchair access, the senior from Clinton, South Carolina, has made disability access the focus of her platform as she competes in pageants.

Ralph White, chemical engineering professor

Research leadership by the numbers

June 08, 2016, Chris Horn

Ralph White’s story could be told in numbers — journal papers published, graduate students who completed their degrees under his tutelage, or years of service as a department chair and dean and mentor and colleague. Or it could be told in international honors. Whatever the case, it's easy to see why he is a recipient of the 2016 Leadership in Research Award.

students with the program director of MAPP

There's a M.A.P.P. for that

May 16, 2016, Craig Brandhorst

Like many new college students, Tamaragail Tarrant, Trevor Prioleau and Kennette Smalls came to the University of South Carolina with few connections and plenty of nervous energy. Navigating a campus the size of UofSC can be intimidating, and all three students describe themselves as shy, whether or not they seem that way when you meet them. Luckily, the three got involved with the university’s Multicultural Assistance Peer Program, a peer-to-peer student mentoring program for students with multicultural backgrounds, and found everything they need to fit in, have fun and get the most from their college experience.

stamps scholars

Stamps Family Charitable Foundation invests in UofSC students

May 13, 2016, Page Ivey

For today’s college students, a big part of their education happens outside the classroom, in the “real world.” But finding the time — and sometimes, more importantly, the money — for such real-world experiences can be difficult. Now USC’s best and brightest students have that opportunity thanks to the Stamps Carolina Scholars program

Julie Hubbert, UofSC School of Music professor.

Hollywood bound!

May 12, 2016, Glenn Hare

Julie Hubbert is a film buff, and this summer she's headed to Hollywood. But not to stalk the likes of Leonardo DiCaprio or Jennifer Lawrence. A recipient of a National Endowment of Humanities Summer Stipend and a music historian in the School of Music, Hubbert will busy her days in Tinsel Town combing the documents of legendary filmmakers from the New Hollywood era, also dubbed the American New Wave.

Harvie Nachlinger

Last call

May 04, 2016, Chris Horn

Carolina is one of the few large public universities that still announces each graduate by name at its commencement ceremonies, even as the number of graduates has increased dramatically in recent years. For Harvie Nachlinger, it’s just a matter of speed and diction to enunciate each student's name.

Sharon DeWitte (right) and Samantha Yaussy

A skeletal marker of physiological stress might indicate good, rather than poor, health

May 02, 2016, Steven Powell

Biological anthropologist Sharon DeWitte (right) studies ancient skeletons that can open a window onto the human history she hopes to illuminate. But as she and graduate student Samantha Yaussy show in a recently published study, some of the markers on the skeletons that scientists use to decipher the past might need to be looked at in a new light.

odonnell

Sail away

April 28, 2016, Dan Cook

Five years ago, there was no Gamecock Sailing Club. Today, there’s an active club with up to 80-plus members during any given semester. Meanwhile, the club’s president, a senior finance major who graduates this week, hopes to turn her passion into a career in the sailing industry.

Eugenes

Molding a creative life

April 28, 2016, Megan Sexton

Rosa and Winton Eugene married in 1968 and moved from South Carolina to Chicago and back home again, with careers in carpentry, nursing, carpet installation and farming along the way. But it’s the work they are doing now – making elegant, functional pottery in their Upstate studio – that has brought them attention. Each will be awarded an honorary Doctor of Fine Arts degree at commencement.

greener statue

Deconstructing Reconstruction

April 14, 2016, Peggy Binette

Reconstruction was the first chapter in America’s civil rights movement. And its influence on race relations continues across the country and on college campuses, although few may realize its connection. Now 150 years later, the University of South Carolina’s History Center and Historic Columbia hopes to deepen public understanding of Reconstruction’s history and racial legacy with a symposium April 21–22.

UofSC, IBM open Center for Innovation; announce new collaboration

April 14, 2016, Jeff Stensland

The University of South Carolina and IBM announced a broadening of their collaboration, applying cognitive capabilities and the Internet of Things (IoT) to develop new solutions for predictive analytics and maintenance. On Thursday the two organizations are hosted the grand opening of the $25 million Center for Applied Innovation, where university, IBM and private sector researchers—including Fluor Corporation—will use the technology for a host of real-world applications.

Florence med school campus

Side by side

April 12, 2016, Chris Horn

It’s probably not a record, but third-year medical student Dustin Rawlinson still marvels at how much experience he got in his recent obstetrics rotation — delivering 20 babies in two weeks. Rawlinson is among the inaugural cohort of M-III students at the School of Medicine’s Florence regional campus, and they and the other M-IIIs are getting a full dose of hands-on learning.

William Shakespeare

The Folio's the Thing

April 07, 2016, Craig Brandhorst

William Shakespeare’s First Folio, an anthology of 36 plays compiled by the playwright’s friends seven years after his death, is considered one of the most important books in the English language and is widely credited for preserving Shakespeare’s for the future. From April 14 to April 30, one of the few remaining copies will be on display at University of South Carolina’s Ernest F. Hollings Special Collections Library courtesy of the Folger Shakespeare Library in Washington, D.C.

Tux on Trux

How fitting: Students create new business to modernize formalwear rentals

April 07, 2016, Olivia Currey

Back when Parker Moore was in high school, he and his friends spent upwards of three hours driving to and from the closest big city to get fitted for, pick up and return their rented tuxes for prom. Now a senior marketing and management major in the Darla Moore School of Business, Moore launched a business to reduce prom tux frustration. He is testing his Tux on Trux this prom season in South Carolina.

Riley Brady

Senior marine science major earns four-year graduate fellowship from DOE

April 05, 2016, Steven Powell

Senior marine science major Riley Brady earned a DOE fellowship in computational studies that will cover all tuition and fees plus provide a $36,000 stipend for four years in graduate school. He says UofSC provided conditions for a perfect storm that is giving him a head start as an independent researcher in his field of climate science.

chester-depratter

Still searching

March 31, 2016, Dan Cook

Nearly 450 years after it was established, the Spanish settlement of Santa Elena — situated on Parris Island in Beaufort County — has yet to fully reveal its secrets. Scholars know when it was founded and have unearthed thousands of artifacts at the site. But public awareness of the site remains limited, and relatively little is known about the actual layout of the settlement.

Valencia Callens

The making of an opera diva

March 31, 2016, Glenn Hare

Influenced by the likes of opera stars Leontyne Price and Kathleen Battle, USC music student Valencia Callens has high standards. But the master of music in theatre performance is undaunted by the challenge. Callens will showcase what’s she’s learned at Carolina this weekend when performs in “Speed Dating Tonight!” presented by Opera at USC in the School of Music recital hall.

Caroline Westberg

Helping women teach each other to lead

March 30, 2016, Page Ivey

Helping her peers, especially other young women, find their leadership voice is Caroline Westberg’s passion. She has spent the past year – her senior year at the University of South Carolina – creating Women LEAD. On Wednesday, Westberg was named the 2016 Outstanding Woman of the Year.

blogging

Academic bloggers share research with broader audience

March 28, 2016, Page Ivey

For researchers, little else is more gratifying than studying something that helps someone else — whether it’s finding a sustainable healthy diet, a better way to motivate workers 
or a way to make coursework more engaging. For some professors and researchers that means taking their scholarly work into the blogosphere, where they can reach not just others in their profession, but those who might learn from their work.

amy cockcroft

Cockroft Leadership Program fulfills founder's vision

March 21, 2016

Amy V. Cockcroft was a leader in nursing, always pushing for better-educated and better-prepared nurses and then for nurses who were ready to take on leadership positions. It’s why she established the College of Nursing’s Nursing Leadership Development program more than 20 years ago, to provide nurses with the skills, strategies, knowledge and techniques in becoming successful health care leaders within a generation of rapid change.

Marjorie Spruill

Divided we stand

March 17, 2016, Peggy Binette

History professor Marjorie Spruill will give a public talk about how the events that divided American women in the 1970s are connected to the polarized politics that has gripped America since 1980. Her talk, which will take place at 6 p.m. March 22 in Capstone House, is based on forthcoming book with Bloomsbury Press, titled “Divided We Stand: Women’s Rights, Family Values & the Polarization of American Politics.”

Angela Liese

Ground-breaking researcher helps others start careers

March 16, 2016, Page Ivey

In her 15 years at the Arnold School of Public Health, epidemiology and biostatistics professor Angela Liese has not only done ground-breaking research in the area of nutrition, food security and diabetes, but also mentored dozens of junior faculty both in the Arnold School and in other colleges and disciplines. Liese has been named a 2016 Breakthrough Leadership Award winner by the Office of Research.

norman and gerry sue arnold

Arnold School marks 40 years of making SC healthier

March 15, 2016, Page Ivey

Very few disciplines have as much real-world immediate impact as public health, and the University of South Carolina’s Arnold School of Public Health has increased its reach and impact in each of its 40 years, going from seven faculty members and 34 students in 1975 to more than 2,500 students and 137 faculty who last year garnered $36 million in research dollars.