Recent Stories

Cold Case

Solving the cold case

May 23, 2017, Chris Horn

Established about three years ago in the Children’s Law Center with funding from the Casey Family Programs, Cold Case goes to bat for S.C. children who have lingered in foster care for years. The goal is to help them to be adopted or to establish meaningful contact with a family member or adult friend who will be there for them down the road.

nsf grant

USC researchers land $1.3 million grant to enhance STEM education

May 03, 2017, Kathryn McPhail

Researchers from the School of Medicine and College of Education recently received a $1.3 million National Science Foundation grant to study the best ways to encourage students to pursue careers in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) through participation at informal learning sites.

joe_toomb_china

From Carolina to ... anywhere

April 21, 2017, Dan Cook

Last year, some 1,700 undergraduates studied abroad — a 15 percent increase. The quick jump is just one aspect of the increasing internationalization of the University of South Carolina, a coordinated effort led by Global Carolina, a strategic initiative launched two years ago.

awards day

Top students honored at annual Awards Day ceremony

April 20, 2017, Mary-Kathryn Craft

Three graduating seniors received the university's highest honors at the annual Awards Day ceremony. Jory Mackenzie Fleming and Megan Patricia O’Brien received Algernon Sydney Sullivan awards, the university’s top honor for undergraduates, and Cory Cambridge Alpert received the Steven N. Swanger award, the university’s second-highest undergraduate honor.

Sarah Gehlert

New dean named for College of Social Work

April 11, 2017, John Brunelli

The University of South Carolina has named Sarah Gehlert as the dean of the College of Social Work. Gehlert comes to Carolina from Washington University in St. Louis, where she was the E. Desmond Lee Professor of Racial and Ethnic Diversity.

Norma Frizzell

Breakthrough Star: Norma Frizzell

March 24, 2017, Chris Horn

If a key component in a car goes bad, the car won’t go for long. That’s roughly what happens in the human body when mutations and other insults disrupt the mitochondria, the essential energy-making components of human cells. Norma Frizzell has devoted much of her career to understanding how and why mitochondria go haywire and sometimes lead to fatal maladies.

clovis extinction

UofSC discovery of widespread platinum may help solve Clovis people mystery

March 08, 2017, Peggy Binette

No one knows for certain why the Clovis people and iconic beasts -- mastodon, mammoth and saber-toothed tiger – living some 12,800 years ago suddenly disappeared. However, a discovery of widespread platinum at archaeological sites across the United States by three University of South Carolina archaeologists has provided an important clue in solving this enduring mystery. The research findings are outlined in a new study released Thursday (March 9) in Scientific Reports, a publication of Nature.

spring

Celebrate spring at Carolina

March 02, 2017, Peggy Binette

There’s no better place in Columbia to enjoy spring than the University of South Carolina and its iconic Horseshoe. To officially usher in the season, My Carolina Alumni Association is hosting two public events: A historic Horseshoe tour and reception with University Archivist Elizabeth West on March 9 and an evening of Southern heirloom foods and culture with Carolina Distinguished Professor David Shields on March 16.

meet and three

Fake news is real

February 14, 2017, Page Ivey

Fake news. You’ve heard about it, consumed it, probably even believed it — at least on occasion. But what is it? Why does it exist? How do we combat it and why can’t it just go away? USC Times invited two faculty members and an alumnus who serves as the attorney for the South Carolina Press Association to discuss one of the most vexing of 21st century media problems — the rampant spread of fake news, clickbait profiteering and outright propaganda.

mentoring

Lean on me

February 06, 2017

There’s no question that having a good mentor can help shape an individual’s career — especially in the field of law. That’s why the University of South Carolina School of Law has devoted substantial resources to take its mentoring program to a new level.

richard t. greener

UofSC to celebrate legacy of Richard T. Greener

January 25, 2017, Peggy Binette

Monday (Jan. 30) marks the birthday of Richard T. Greener, the University of South Carolina’s first African-American professor. The university will commemorate Greener on his 173rd birthday at 4 p.m. in the program room of the Hollings Special Collections Library, where a 2-foot model of a statue of Greener will be unveiled. The memorial statue, which will be located outside the university’s Thomas Cooper Library, will be unveiled this fall.

Carolina Day at the Statehouse

Say yes to Carolina Day at the Statehouse

January 19, 2017, Peggy Binette

Inspired by his rural roots, Dr. Caughman Taylor believes in the power and purpose of advocacy. On Wednesday he'll join Carolina alumni, faculty, staff and students for Carolina Day at the Statehouse. That's when he and others will meet with legislators to share their stories in support of higher education as being vital to the economic health of the state and lives of its residents.

allison marsh

Allison Marsh: Public History in 3D

January 06, 2017, Craig Brandhorst

If you want to break down the traditional classroom wall, look no further than public history, a discipline with one foot outside the academy already. Ask Allison Marsh, director of the University of South Carolina’s public history program, whose forays into the virtual world bring an added dimension to online learning and whose real world “classroom” stretches from the Carolina campus to Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.

inspired teaching

Inspired teaching

January 03, 2017, Chris Horn

Helping faculty members build online and blended courses is only one aspect of the Center for Teaching Excellence, an initiative the university launched 10 years ago as part of a broader effort to enhance student learning by fostering a culture of effective and innovative teaching.

healthier lunch

UofSC works to bring healthier food to school lunch menus

December 19, 2016, Allen Wallace

Many of us share the memory from school days gone by: a glob of something that might be carrots one day, a heap of something green the next, unceremoniously plopped into a compartment of our school lunch trays and then avoided at all costs. The University of South Carolina is working with several state agencies to end that unpleasant tradition and make the lunches healthier and tastier.

Year end review

Twenty-Sixteen: By the Letters

December 15, 2016, USC Times

A is for alphabet, at least according to USC Times. To help close out 2016, the University of South Carolina’s monthly magazine for faculty and staff devoted its entire December issue to the ABCs of 2016 — with each letter representing a different accomplishment, announcement or notable arrival from the past year.

sc encyclopedia

SC Encyclopedia off the shelf and on the web

December 14, 2016, Page Ivey

If you’re of a certain age, you might remember the row of dusty encyclopedias in your parents’ den — books that were the Google of their day but limited in what they could convey. Now you can open the “South Carolina Encyclopedia” and hear Dizzy Gillespie talk about be-bop or watch qualifying for a 1970s Southern 500 stock car race. That’s because the encyclopedia has gone digital.

talbot brewer

Understanding the humanities and happiness with Talbot Brewer

December 07, 2016, Peggy Binette

What are the keys to happiness? What is the meaning of life? Philosopher and University of Virginia professor Talbot Brewer will discuss how to find these answers in the humanities in a public talk Dec. 14. The event is offered as part of a $2.1 million funded grant project titled, “Virtue, Happiness and the Meaning of Life,” which is co-directed by Carolina philosopher Jennifer Frey.

Brittany VanderBeek

A revolutionary rivalry

November 18, 2016, Jo Jo Winkelmann

Graduate business student Brittany VanderBeek was put on a project of epic proportions during her internship at Michelin: Bring Carolina and Clemson students together to help reduce waste at a tire manufacturer. Next semester, the first joint class of students will begin working on solutions thanks to VanderBeek's hard work.

cayce_mayor_elise_partin

City of Cayce's first female mayor teaches course on civic engagement

November 08, 2016, Dan Cook

Elise Partin is not only an an adjunct professor in the Arnold School of Public Health — she’s also the first female mayor of Cayce. This fall, she’s teaching an Honors College course called “Demystifying Elected Office.” The goal is to teach students exactly what’s involved in the process of running for and holding an elected position.

brianne dunn

Pharmacy professor takes roundabout route to teaching

November 07, 2016, Laura Kammerer

Brie Dunn earned a chemistry degree as an undergrad and soon found herself wearing a hard hat and steel-toed shoes in an industrial lab. After tiring of that environment, she returned to school to earn a Pharm.D. degree. Through all of those changes, she never thought much about teaching, but that’s exactly what she found herself doing after joining the clinical pharmacy faculty at Carolina six years ago.

tom_scott_sc_cyber

Can't hack this

October 31, 2016, Dan Cook

From bank accounts to presidential campaigns, it seems that nothing is off-limits for computer hackers these days. That's why SC Cyber — a statewide cybersecurity initiative housed in the Office of Economic Engagement — is working to improve our defenses and raise awareness about how cybersecurity issues impact all of us.

Sara Schwebel has edited and published a critical edition of

English professor, students shed new light on 1960 children's classic

October 19, 2016, Lynn Schutte

Scott O’Dell’s 1960 book “Island of the Blue Dolphins” has been a classroom favorite, despite some potentially controversial elements. The University of South Carolina’s Sara Schwebel, associate professor of English, is working to help explain that controversy. With the help of students, Schwebel has edited and published a critical edition of the book, complete with an introduction and essays to help place the narrative in its correct historical and cultural context.

post_image_ari_streisfeld

The road to the academy

October 18, 2016, Dan Cook

For the past 11 years, Ari Streisfeld has played violin in the JACK Quartet, performing at Carnegie Hall, the Lincoln Center and on stages throughout the world. Now, he is on to the next chapter — as assistant professor of violin and violin pedagogy in the University of South Carolina School of Music.

david_lankes_post_image

University poised to lead in transformation of libraries, information science

October 10, 2016, Dan Cook

David Lankes went to college to become an illustrator; he ended up working on websites in the early days of the Internet instead. Now director of the School of Library and Information Science and associate dean in the College of Information and Communications, Lankes has been at the forefront of his field ever since.

michael dowdy

Expanding the literary canon

October 09, 2016, Chris Horn

For Michael Dowdy, there’s a familiar ring to this year’s political rhetoric about border walls and deportation of Latinos. “Latinos have a different story than most in coming to the United States and a unique perspective on the American dream,” says Dowdy, a recently appointed associate professor whose specialty is Latino literature and poetry.

after the flood

After the Flood: Weathering the storm

October 02, 2016, Steven Powell

Immediately following the October 2015 flood in South Carolina, USC researchers began looking at issues related to the once-in-a-lifetime catastrophe. In Part 5 of our "after the flood" series, we look at the flood's impact on the state's coastal estuaries. The SC Floods Conference, initially scheduled for Friday (Oct. 7), has been postponed due to Hurricane Matthew.

smithwick

PASOs: Step by step

September 20, 2016, Craig Brandhorst

Julie Smithwick began laying the groundwork for PASOs as part of a field placement project for her master’s in social work in 2005. Now based at the Arnold School of Public Health, the statewide organization provides health care education and resource navigation to 8,500 Latinos a year and boasts a budget of $1.3 million.