Recent Stories

richard t. greener

UofSC to celebrate legacy of Richard T. Greener

January 25, 2017, Peggy Binette

Monday (Jan. 30) marks the birthday of Richard T. Greener, the University of South Carolina’s first African-American professor. The university will commemorate Greener on his 173rd birthday at 4 p.m. in the program room of the Hollings Special Collections Library, where a 2-foot model of a statue of Greener will be unveiled. The memorial statue, which will be located outside the university’s Thomas Cooper Library, will be unveiled this fall.

Mindy Castles

A southern connection

January 09, 2017, Chris Horn

Mindy and Jack Castles made Beaufort, S.C., their home in retirement. So when it was time to donate Jack's extensive collection of Civil War documents, USC Beaufort was the natural selection.

sc encyclopedia

SC Encyclopedia off the shelf and on the web

December 14, 2016, Page Ivey

If you’re of a certain age, you might remember the row of dusty encyclopedias in your parents’ den — books that were the Google of their day but limited in what they could convey. Now you can open the “South Carolina Encyclopedia” and hear Dizzy Gillespie talk about be-bop or watch qualifying for a 1970s Southern 500 stock car race. That’s because the encyclopedia has gone digital.

WWII platoon

The day everything changed

December 06, 2016, Chris Horn

Franklin D. Roosevelt called it “a date which will live in infamy” — Dec. 7, 1941, the day Japan attacked the U.S. Navy base at Pearl Harbor, dragging America into a cataclysmic world war and dramatically altering the course of history. For USC students like Jim Pearce, the event had personal ramifications, as the immediate effect of the Sunday morning attack changed the mood on campus from pre-holiday gaiety to frenetic patriotism.

rivalry week

The journey of our in-state rivalry

November 17, 2016, Adena Rice

Carolina and Clemson’s rivalry is as intense as an in-state competition can be. It’s deep-rooted in history, politics and athletics with Carolina fans having a dislike for anything orange and purple. But in recent years, the rivalry has been used to encourage spirited competition to help the South Carolina community.

swamp fox

21st century fox hunt

August 23, 2016, Craig Brandhorst

Archaeologist Steve Smith is continuing to pursue his lifelong fascination with one of South Carolina’s most famous Revolutionaries, Francis Marion, the Swamp Fox. Smith and colleagues are investigating Fort Motte, the Colonial plantation where Marion and “Light Horse” Harry Lee won a major victory against the British.

meet and three

Sacred space

August 17, 2016, Craig Brandhorst

As an urban campus, the University of South Carolina intersects with the city at every turn. USC Times invited university architect Derek Gruner and two colleagues to McCutchen House for a lunchtime conversation about historic preservation, campus growth and our place in the larger community.

buying a bride

Law professor explores history, future of mail-order marriages

July 11, 2016, Rob Schaller

“Without marriage, there could be no stable family units, no children, and no future. And without mail-order brides, one could argue, there might not be a United States of America. The entire colonial endeavor hinged on marriage,” says University of South Carolina law professor Marcia Yablon-Zug, whose new book, “Buying a Bride: An Engaging History of Mail-Order Matches,” traces the phenomenon as far back as our nation’s first permanent English settlement, Jamestown.

greener statue

Deconstructing Reconstruction

April 14, 2016, Peggy Binette

Reconstruction was the first chapter in America’s civil rights movement. And its influence on race relations continues across the country and on college campuses, although few may realize its connection. Now 150 years later, the University of South Carolina’s History Center and Historic Columbia hopes to deepen public understanding of Reconstruction’s history and racial legacy with a symposium April 21–22.

chester-depratter

Still searching

March 31, 2016, Dan Cook

Nearly 450 years after it was established, the Spanish settlement of Santa Elena — situated on Parris Island in Beaufort County — has yet to fully reveal its secrets. Scholars know when it was founded and have unearthed thousands of artifacts at the site. But public awareness of the site remains limited, and relatively little is known about the actual layout of the settlement.

amy cockcroft

Cockroft Leadership Program fulfills founder's vision

March 21, 2016

Amy V. Cockcroft was a leader in nursing, always pushing for better-educated and better-prepared nurses and then for nurses who were ready to take on leadership positions. It’s why she established the College of Nursing’s Nursing Leadership Development program more than 20 years ago, to provide nurses with the skills, strategies, knowledge and techniques in becoming successful health care leaders within a generation of rapid change.

Anita Singleton-Prather

Sacred music and Gullah culture showcased this weekend

February 22, 2016, Glenn Hare

Noted Gullah storyteller and singer Anita Singleton-Prather, along with the Gullah Kinfolk, will share stories and songs at “Shared Traditions: Sacred Music in the South,” a two-day symposium featuring shape-note singing, African-American spirituals and other music traditions unique to the South. The symposium starts with a meet-and-greet with Singleton-Prather at 3:30 p.m. Friday (Feb. 26) in the McKissick Museum on the historic Horseshoe.

Stranded boat after Hurricane Katrina

Earth, wind and fire

February 15, 2016, Chris Horn

If it's a disaster, whether natural or manmade, the Hazards and Vulnerabilities Research Lab at the University of South Carolina has probably considered the ramifications of it from every angle. It's what they do — studying vulnerability to potential disasters across the U.S. while also interpreting data from past disasters.

co-eds on the horseshoe circa 1898

Learn something new 'On the Horseshoe'

December 01, 2015, Page Ivey

Elizabeth Cassidy West has been telling and curating the story of the University of South Carolina for more than 15 years as the university’s archivist. But nowhere is the university’s story more clearly told than in the buildings of the Horseshoe, the original campus for South Carolina College and the heart of today’s sprawling downtown Columbia campus.