University of South Carolina

4 USC faculty members named AAAS fellows

By Jeff Stensland, stenslan@mailbox.sc.edu, 803-777-3686

Four University of South Carolina professors have been named fellows of the prestigious American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) because of their scientific accomplishments. The four new fellows are Michael Amiridis, Mitzi Nagarkatti, Qian Wang and Ralph White.

USC now has a total of 23 AAAS fellows, a jump from 13 just two years ago. A total of 702 new fellows from around the world earned the designation this year.

AAAS is the world’s largest general scientific society and publishes numerous newsletters, books and journals, including Science.

Mary Anne Fitzpatrick, dean of USC’s College of Arts and Sciences, said this year’s class of AAAS fellows reflects the diversity of fields in which USC is recognized for excellence. “In biology, chemistry and engineering, our faculty members are clearly recognized by their peers as leaders in their disciplines for their distinguished efforts to advance science and its application,” said Fitzpatrick, who was among six USC fellows named last year.

Those honored this year are:

Michael Amiridis, provost and professor of chemical engineering, College of Engineering and Computing. Amiridis was selected for his contribution to the understanding how catalytic converters work for environmental applications and developing new ways of synthesizing catalytic nanoparticles.

 

 Mitzi Nagarkatti, professor and chair of the School of Medicine’s Department of Pathology, Microbiology and Immunology. Nagarkatti was selected for distinguished contributions to the field of regulation of inflammation and for administrative leadership as department chair advancing teaching and research.

 

 Qian Wang, professor in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, College of Arts and Sciences. Wang was selected for distinguished contribution to the field of biomaterials development and bioconjugation chemistry, particularly for the self-assembly study of proteins and bionanoparticles.

 Ralph White, professor in the Department of Chemical Engineering, College of Engineering and Computing. White was selected for pioneering work on the mathematical modeling of electrochemical systems, particularly in the areas of fuel cells, batteries, corrosion, electrodeposition and electrolysis.

The tradition of AAAS Fellows began in 1874. Currently, members of AAAS can be considered for the rank of fellow if nominated by the steering groups of the association, by any three fellows from other institutions or by the AAAS chief executive officer.

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Posted: 12/06/12 @ 12:00 AM | Updated: 12/10/12 @ 4:28 PM | Permalink