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From left, Shirley James of the Minority AIDS Council of Orangeburg, Bamberg, and Calhoun counties; Saundra Glover of the Arnold School; Kim Creek of the S.C. College of Pharmacy at USC; and Dr. Rebecca Dillard of Claflin University.
From left, Shirley James of the Minority AIDS Council of Orangeburg, Bamberg, and Calhoun counties; Saundra Glover of the Arnold School; Kim Creek of the S.C. College of Pharmacy at USC; and Dr. Rebecca Dillard of Claflin University.

Continued: Grant

In South Carolina, obesity is more prevalent among blacks than whites -- 40.1 percent vs. 26.1 percent. The prevalence of diabetes also varies by race and ethnicity: 13.1 percent of blacks have diabetes compared to 8.4 percent of whites, according to the United Health Foundation.

There were 6,055 HIV/AIDS cases among white men and women in South Carolina and more than 17,000 cases of HIV/AIDS among black men and women in the state in December 2009, according to statistics from the S.C. Department of Health and Environmental Control.

A USC Arnold School of Public Health study, published in the June 1, 2009, issue of the journal Cancer, found that mortality-to-incident Ratios (MIR) for diseases were much higher among African Americans than whites. Among the findings:

Female breast cancer: Among African-American females, the MIR is higher than the national average. In most areas of the Palmetto State, the MIR is more than 20 percent higher than the rest of the United States.

Colorectal cancer: Colorectal cancer MIRs for white men and women are at the national average or below in every part of the state. But for African Americans living in the Pee Dee and the counties along the Grand Strand and Lowcountry, the MIR is above the national average by at least 20 percent.

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