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Two endowed chairs focus on cancer, brain research

 

Rorden said the SmartState chair at USC was appealing for several reasons.

“There are certain motivating factors as a scientist,” Rorden said. “The university has good facilities, which include the McCausland Center for Brain Imaging. It also has a critical core of neuroscience researchers and a vision for both.”

Rorden is working with other scientists at the university who conduct stroke-related research. For Roninson, the opportunity to work with colleagues with similar interests in drug discovery and experimental oncology drew him to the SmartState chair in Columbia.

“Between good colleagues with interests close to mine, especially in cancer research, a good atmosphere in Columbia and the access to the Hollings Cancer Center at MUSC, It felt like a congenial and productive environment,” Roninson said.

Roninson has more than 30 years of experience in academia and biotechnology, including more than 150 published articles and 39 issued U.S. patents.

Roninson’s principal interests in academic research include: developing personalized cancer therapy based on target and drug discovery through functional genomics; functional genomics of aging and longevity; chemical genomics of tumor microenvironment; mechanisms and pharmacological modulation of a damage-inducible signal transduction pathway implicated in cancer, Alzheimer’s disease and viral diseases. He is also president and chief scientific officer of Senex Biotechnology Inc., which has relocated to Columbia.

South Carolina’s SmartState program was created by the legislature in 2002 and is funded through lottery proceeds. The legislation authorizes the state's three public research institutions, USC, Clemson and the Medical University of South Carolina, to use state funds to create economic excellence centers in research areas that will advance South Carolina's economy.

 

About the SmartState Program

The South Carolina SmartState™ Program (previously known as the CoEE Program) was created by the South Carolina legislature in 2002 and is funded through South Carolina Education Lottery proceeds. The legislation authorizes the state's three public research institutions, Medical University of South Carolina, Clemson University and the University of South Carolina, to use state funds to create Centers of Economic Excellence in research areas that will advance South Carolina's economy. Each Center of Economic Excellence is awarded from $2 million to $5 million in state lottery funds, which must be matched on a dollar-for-dollar basis with non-state investment. To date, 49 Centers have been created and 38 SmartState Endowed Chairs have been appointed to lead the centers. The SmartState Program has resulted in more than $400 million dollars in non-state investment into the South Carolina economy and is responsible for the creation of 5,000 jobs. .

 

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Posted: 09/20/11 @ 11:00 AM | Updated: 10/13/11 @ 1:23 PM | Permalink

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