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Arnold School of Public Health


Minors

The Arnold School offers two minors that are compatible with a range of majors in colleges and schools across the University. The Department of Health Promotion, Education, and Behavior (HPEB) oversees both minors. Learn more about them and contact us for more information.

Minor in Health Promotion, Education, and Behavior

The Minor in HPEB provides a basic foundation for students who desire preparation in health promotion, health education, health behavior and disease prevention. This minor may be used in combination with many majors (e.g., exercise science, psychology, sociology, anthropology, political science, nursing, international studies, women’s studies, teacher education, etc.) to enhance your career opportunities and as preparation for graduate study in a variety of health and health-related disciplines.

Requirements

A minimum of 18 credit hours, at least nine of which must be HPEB courses, is required from the comprehensive HPEB minor curriculum. A maximum of three non-HPEB courses can be taken to fulfill the elective requirements. Students must complete courses with a grade of ‘C’ or higher.

Minor in Nutrition & Food Systems

HPEB has partnered with the Center for Research in Nutrition and Health Disparities to offer students a Minor in Nutrition and Food Systems. This minor is appropriate for a wide range of majors (e.g., exercise science, psychology, teacher education, nursing, anthropology, international studies, political science, women’s studies, etc.) — not just public health majors. It includes courses that focus on production, processing, retail, consumption and disposal of food.

This minor is designed to help mitigate the shortage of trained professionals by building your competencies in the areas of food system transformation, environmental sustainability, nutritional health improvement and social justice.

Program Goals

Upon completion of minor coursework, students will:

  • Understand political, social and economic contexts for changes in world food systems
  • Understand connections between soil, water and air health, the food supply, and human health and chronic disease