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School of the Earth, Ocean and Environment


Volcanology-Geochemistry-Petrology

Volcanic and related magmatic and hydrothermal processes are active areas of research in the Department of Earth & Ocean Sciences. Our work in these areas spans the physical, chemical and biological realms, and is supported by state-of- the-art research facilities. Our faculty direct field and laboratory based investigations of volcanic and related processes around the world, including Alaska, Hawaii, Ecuador,Japan, Kamchatka, the East Pacific Rise, and the Azores Islands.

Volcanology, Geochemistry & Petrology Faculty

Michael Bizimis

Michael Bizimis

Radiogenic isotope (Hf, Nd, Sr, Pb, Os) and trace element geochemistry, Igneous Petrology, in their broadest sense. Geochemical evolution of the Terrestrial mantle. Mantle plume dynamics, plume-lithosphere interaction, and the origin of Ocean Island volcanism. Water and the fate of volatiles in the mantle. Element fluxes in subduction zones. Elemental exchange between seawater and mantle lithosphere in hydrothermal systems. Hg-isotopes as a tracer of Hg cycling in the environment. Elemental fluxes in salt marshes and coastal environments.

Susan Lang

Susan Lang

Aqueous biogeochemistry; water-rock-microbe interactions, particularly in hydrothermal and subsurface systems; stable (13C, 15N, 34S) and radiocarbon (14C) isotopes of organic molecules; serpentinization as a source of energy for microbes and the abiotic synthesis of organic molecules; past, present, and future cycling of carbon and nitrogen through the environment.

Scott White

Scott White

Most of the Earth's surface is hidden underwater, from the deep seafloor to wetland environments. Revealing the patterns and processes in these marine environments is the overarching theme of Scott's research group in marine geology and geophysics.

Gene Yogodzinski

Gene Yogodzinski

My research combines geological field work with geochemical studies that focus primarily on the use of trace element and isotope geochemistry to understand igneous processes. I am particularly interested in understanding how the geochemistry of subduction-related magma is controlled by tectonics in different subduction settings.