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Palmetto College

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Bachelor of Arts in Liberal Studies

Build an interdisciplinary bachelor’s degree to match your personal goals and interests.

The Palmetto College Online Bachelor of Arts degree in Liberal Studies is issued by USC Columbia. 

Puzzle Pieces with Degree Paths

Overview

Customize your bachelor’s degree to meet your educational, career, or personal goals by selecting two academic disciplines best suited for you, or from our list of popular emphases. Your degree may combine any two disciplines and one cognate within each emphasis OR you may choose your own emphasis. Below are popular emphases within our program.    

The Bachelor of Arts in Liberal Studies degree fosters critical and analytical thinking.

The degree requires 120 credit hours, including general education and elective requirements, 27 hours of major-level coursework, and 12 hours of coursework in a cognate field of study. Students also complete a course in South Carolina Studies, an internship or service-learning project, and a senior capstone course.  

The Arts & Society emphasis allows students to explore interests related to the arts (visual and performing) and their influence on human society. 

The emphasis includes options in arts education, art history, art studio, film, music, and theatre, providing students with the opportunity to explore both arts theory and production.

Career options for students choosing this emphasis include design, media, education cultural production, museum/gallery work, etc.

Creative Writing (Credits: 3) ENGL 360
Workshop course on writing original fiction, poetry, drama, and creative nonfiction. 

Shakespeare’s Comedies and Histories (Credits: 3) ENGL 406
Discussion based study of Shakespeare’s Comedies and Histories. 

British Romantic Literature (Credits: 3) ENGL 411
Poetry and prose of the English Romantic period. 

Southern Literature (Credits: 3) ENGL 427
Representative works of Southern writers. 

The Rise of Industrial America, 1877-1917 (Credits: 3) HIST 405
A survey of recent United States history with emphasis on the economic, social, and literary developments from 1877 to 1917. 

The History of Mexico (Credits: 3) HIST 423
Mexico from the pre-conquest period to the present, with an emphasis on modern Mexico. 

The New South (Credits: 3) HIST 443
Reconstruction, the Bourbon era, agrarian revolt, industrial revolution, racial problems, and the changes resulting from the impact of two world wars and the New Deal (1865-1946). 

South Carolina Studies (Credits: 3) PALM 493
Reading and writing about South Carolina from the perspective of multiple disciplines, incorporating elements of the student’s major and cognate. 

Survey of Learning and Memory (Credits: 3) PSYC 400
Research and applications concerning the acquisition of new behavior and knowledge, including accounts based on classical and instrumental conditioning and on information-processing models. 

Survey of Social Psychology (Credits: 3) PSYC 430
Introduction to theory and research in social psychology from a psychological viewpoint. Topics include social perception, social cognition, attitudes, interpersonal relationships, aggression, prosocial behavior, and group processes 

Children’s Literature (Credits: 3) SLIS 325
A study of materials for children from birth through elementary school (age 13) with emphasis on the evaluation, selection, and use of those materials to meet the educational, cultural, and recreational needs of children. 

Introduction to Social Problems (Credits: 3) SOCY 340
Contemporary social issues such as poverty, health, the criminal justice system, globalization and the environment, their causes and possible solutions. 

Senior Capstone Experience (Credits: 3) PALM 401
Senior capstone experience based upon student’s major concentration.

Internship (Credits: 3) PALM 494
Supervised immersion and exploration in a field related to the major, with a career, cultural, or community focus.

Service Learning (Credits: 3) PALM 495
An exploration of theories of service-learning with application of practical solutions to meet community needs.

*This emphasis may require a hybrid schedule, including both online and in-person courses.

The Public Health emphasis provides a well-rounded education with an emphasis on how social context, health care systems, and physical environments influence health behaviors and health status, allowing students to acquire a broad understanding of public health concepts and issues facing the modern world.

Career pathways include Public Health Associate, Quality Advisor, Ethics Officer, Safety Specialist, Nutrition Advisor, and Community Health & Wellbeing consultant.

Introduction to Health Promotion, Education, and Behavior (Credits: 3) HPEB 300
The historical and philosophical basis, current problems, career opportunities, and literature in the health promotion, education, and behavior change professions. 

Personal and Community Health (Credits: 3) HPEB 321
Psychosocial health, stress management, leading infectious and noninfectious diseases, nutrition, physical fitness, sexuality, consumer health and health care access, environmental health, aging, and death. 

Applied Aspects of Human Nutrition (Credits: 3) HPEB 502
Application of nutrition principles including functions of food and nutrients in health and disease prevention throughout the life cycle. Applied topics include weight management, food safety, and other contemporary issues. 

Health Economics (Credits: 3) HSPM 412
Designed to serve as an introduction to economic principles and applications used in the health sector. The role economics plays in various aspects of health care, demand-side and supply-side factors and issues, how various health care systems are impacted. 

South Carolina Studies (Credits: 3) PALM 493
Reading and writing about South Carolina from the perspective of multiple disciplines, incorporating elements of the student’s major and cognate. 

Sport Psychology (Credits: 3) PSYC 380
The role of sports in socialization, personality development and competence, including: spectator-performer interactions, motivation, competition effects; and the application of psychological techniques to performance enhancement. 

Cognitive Psychology (Credits: 3) PSYC 405
Research and theories on sensory memory, attention, short-term and working memory, human learning and forgetting, imagery, long-term memory, speech perception, reading, language, thinking and problem solving, and decision making. 

Behavioral and Mental Disorders (Credits: 3) PSYC 410
Covers the classification, diagnosis, etiological theories, and treatments of the major mental and emotional disorders. 

Survey of Developmental Psychology (Credits: 3) PSYC 420
Psychological development from conception to late adulthood. Topics include physical, cognitive, and social processes associated with development at each stage of the life cycle. 

Survey of Social Psychology (Credits: 3) PSYC 430
Introduction to theory and research in social psychology from a psychological viewpoint. Topics include social perception, social cognition, attitudes, interpersonal relationships, aggression, prosocial behavior, and group processes 

Human Factors Psychology (Credits: 3) PSYC 501
Application of research in experimental psychology to ergonomics, the design of human-environment systems, with emphasis on work settings. 

Children Behavioral and Mental Disorders (Credits: 3) PSYC 510
Theories, description, and assessment of child behavior problems and disorders; methods of intervention. 

Psychology of Child Development (Credits: 3) PSYC 520
Examination of development from conception through older childhood. Specific cognitive and social processes will be given in-depth study 

Ecology of Human Social Systems (Credits: 3) SOCY 311
Relationships among and changes in populations, social organization, technology, and the environment. 

Introduction to Social Problems (Credits: 3) SOCY 340
Contemporary social issues such as poverty, health, the criminal justice system, globalization and the environment, their causes and possible solutions. 

Collective Behavior (Credits: 3) SOCY 354
An analysis of crowds, publics, social movements, and the mass society in terms of their institutional and social psychological consequences. 

Organizational Communication (Credits: 3) SPCH 331
Examines communication behavior and networks within organizations through the study of major theories of organizational communication, identifies and defines primary concepts, and applies them to organizational scenarios and case studies. 

Criminal Justice and Mental Health (Credits: 3) CRJU 426
Interface between the mental health sciences and the criminal justice system.

Senior Capstone Experience (Credits: 3) PALM 401
Senior capstone experience based upon student’s major concentration.

Internship (Credits: 3) PALM 494
Supervised immersion and exploration in a field related to the major, with a career, cultural, or community focus.

Service Learning (Credits: 3) PALM 495
An exploration of theories of service-learning with application of practical solutions to meet community needs.

*This emphasis may require a hybrid schedule, including both online and in-person courses.

The History & Politics emphasis provides students with a deep and thorough understanding of important political, social, and cultural events – local, national, and global – through the respective lenses of history and politics.

Students completing this emphasis will be prepared to work in fields such as advocacy, research, public administration, law, or education.

This emphasis is also appropriate for students wishing to further their education by pursuing a graduate degree in law, history, or political science. 

Corrections (Credits: 3) CRJU 312
Current and historical perspectives on incarceration and its alternatives. 

Criminal Courts (Credits: 3) CRJU 313
Structure and organization of the federal and state criminal court systems and personnel. 

Criminal Law (Credits: 3) CRJU 314
Origin and development of criminal law in America. Basic elements of crimes and defenses. 

Violence in America (Credits: 3) CRJU 323
Historical overview of violence in American society, including theoretical perspectives on the causes and prevention of violence. 

Victimization (Credits: 3) CRJU 421
Causes and consequences of criminal victimization and public policy responses to victimization issues. 

Alternatives to Incarceration (Credits: 3) CRJU 422
Correctional alternatives to imprisonment including probation, parole, and various community correctional programs. 

Criminal Justice and Mental Health (Credits: 3) CRJU 426
Interface between the mental health sciences and the criminal justice system. 

The History of South Carolina, 1670-1865 (Credits: 3) HIST 409
A study of South Carolina origins and developments. 

The History of Mexico (Credits: 3) HIST 423
Mexico from the pre-conquest period to the present, with an emphasis on modern Mexico. 

South Carolina Studies (Credits: 3) PALM 493
Reading and writing about South Carolina from the perspective of multiple disciplines, incorporating elements of the student’s major and cognate. 

Negotiation and Conflict in the Workplace (Credits: 3) MGMT 401
This course is designed to improve students’ knowledge and skills in the areas of workplace conflict resolution and negotiations. 

State Government (Credits: 3) POLI 365
A study of state-federal relations, relations among states, state constitutions, and the structure and functions of the three branches of government. Emphasis is given to South Carolina. 

Public Policy (Credits: 3) POLI 374
Process of and major approaches to making public policy particularly, in the United States. Case study materials will focus on such major policies as welfare, health care, national security, and resource management. 

The American Chief Executive (Credits: 3) POLI 463
Constitutional, statutory, and political powers and roles of the American chief executive. 

South Carolina Government and Politics (Credits: 3) POLI 570
South Carolina state and local government in the context of South Carolina history and U.S. state and local government. 

Psychology and Politics (Credits: 3) PSYC 465
Application of psychological theories and assessment and treatment methodologies for health maintenance and the diagnosis and treatment of illness. 

Psychology of Child Development (Credits: 3) PSYC 520
Examination of development from conception through older childhood. Specific cognitive and social processes will be given in-depth study 

Bureaucracy and Modern Society (Credits: 3) SOCY 312
Bureaucracies in the public and private sector, their internal dynamics and relationship to the social environment. 

Sociology of Crime (Credits: 3) SOCY 353
Social factors in the development, identification, and treatment of criminals.

Senior Capstone Experience (Credits: 3) PALM 401
Senior capstone experience based upon student’s major concentration.

Internship (Credits: 3) PALM 494
Supervised immersion and exploration in a field related to the major, with a career, cultural, or community focus.

Service Learning (Credits: 3) PALM 495
An exploration of theories of service-learning with application of practical solutions to meet community needs.

The Human Studies emphasis allows students to focus on human development – both as individuals and in groups – and to study human interaction and environmental influence on behavior.

Students will acquire a broad understanding of topics such as mental health, human development, social behavior, language, and religion.  

An ideal option for helping students whose career goals involve working with the public, both as individuals and in groups.

Anthropology of Magic and Religion (Credits: 3) ANTH 206
A comparative examination of such topics as ritual, cosmology, revitalization movements, magic, witchcraft, myth, and possession.

Internship (Credits: 3) PALM 494
Supervised immersion and exploration in a field related to the major, with a career, cultural, or community focus.

Service-Learning (Credits: 3) PALM 495
An exploration of theories of service-learning with application of practical solutions to meet community needs.

Foundations of Leadership (Credits: 3)
PCAM 205 This course combines leadership theory with practical application, equipping students with the knowledge and skills needed to work more effectively with people, become better leaders, and reach their professional goals.

Cognitive Psychology (Credits: 3) PSYC 405
Research and theories on sensory memory, attention, short-term and working memory, human learning and forgetting, imagery, long-term memory, speech perception, reading, language, thinking and problem solving, and decision making.

Behavioral and Mental Disorders (Credits: 3) PSYC 410
Covers the classification, diagnosis, etiological theories, and treatments of the major mental and emotional disorders.

Survey of Developmental Psychology (Credits: 3) PSYC 420
Psychological development from conception to late adulthood. Topics include physical, cognitive, and social processes associated with development at each stage of the life cycle.

Survey of Social Psychology (Credits: 3) PSYC 430
Introduction to theory and research in social psychology from a psychological viewpoint. Topics include social perception, social cognition, attitudes, interpersonal relationships, aggression, prosocial behavior, and group processes

Human Factors Psychology (Credits: 3) PSYC 501
Application of research in experimental psychology to ergonomics, the design of human-environment systems, with emphasis on work settings.

Ecology of Human Social Systems (Credits: 3) SOCY 311
Relationships among and changes in populations, social organization, technology, and the environment.

Bureaucracy and Modern Society (Credits: 3) SOCY 312
Bureaucracies in the public and private sector, their internal dynamics and relationship to the social environment.

Introduction to Social Problems (Credits: 3) SOCY 340
Contemporary social issues such as poverty, health, the criminal justice system, globalization and the environment, their causes and possible solutions.

Collective Behavior (Credits: 3) SOCY 354
An analysis of crowds, publics, social movements, and the mass society in terms of their institutional and social psychological consequences.

Race, Class, Gender, and Sexuality (Credits: 3) WGST 304
Historical and contemporary power relationships in race, social class, gender, and sexual orientation.

Personal and Community Health (Credits: 3) HPEB 321
Psychosocial health, stress management, leading infectious and noninfectious diseases, nutrition, physical fitness, sexuality, consumer health and health care access, environmental health, aging, and death.

Psychology and Politics (Credits: 3) POLI 465
The role of psychology in political attitudes and behavior. Examination of individual psycho-political relationships and aggregate typologies. Particular emphasis on the psychological roots of the need for or the rejection of political authority.

Senior Capstone Experience (Credits: 3) PALM 401
Senior capstone experience based upon student’s major concentration.

Internship (Credits: 3) PALM 494
Supervised immersion and exploration in a field related to the major, with a career, cultural, or community focus.

Service Learning (Credits: 3) PALM 495
An exploration of theories of service-learning with application of practical solutions to meet community needs.

The Cultural Studies emphasis provides students with the skills to analyze and interpret cultures, ethnicities, and the preservation of the history and ways of life within human societies.

This emphasis is appealing to students passionate about studying religion, anthropology, and specifically, Native American Studies. 

Students selecting this option may consider a career in community relations, cultural preservation, or social services.

Anthropology of Magic and Religion (Credits: 3) ANTH 206 
A comparative examination of such topics as ritual, cosmology, revitalization movements, magic, witchcraft, myth, and possession. 

British Romantic Literature (Credits: 3) ENGL 411 
Poetry and prose of the English Romantic period. 

Southern Literature (Credits: 3) ENGL 427 
Representative works of Southern writers. 

The Middle East in Modern Times (Credits: 3) HIST 347 
The impact of modern civilization upon the Middle East, including the history of the Arab, Turkish, Iranian, and Israeli segments of the Middle East during the 19th and 20th centuries. 

The Rise of Industrial America, 1877-1917 (Credits: 3) HIST 405 
A survey of recent United States history with emphasis on the economic, social, and literary developments from 1877 to 1917. 

History of Mexico (Credits: 3) HIST 423 
Mexico from the pre-conquest period to the present, with an emphasis on modern Mexico. 

The New South (Credits: 3) HIST 443 
Reconstruction, the Bourbon era, agrarian revolt, industrial revolution, racial problems, and the changes resulting from the impact of two world wars and the New Deal (1865-1946). 

South Carolina Studies (Credits: 3) PALM 493 
Reading and writing about South Carolina from the perspective of multiple disciplines, incorporating elements of the student’s major and cognate. 

Sociology of Families (Credits: 3) SOCY 305 
Sociological perspectives related to various aspects of family behaviors, roles, and values. 

Introduction to Social Problems (Credits: 3) SOCY 340 
Contemporary social issues such as poverty, health, the criminal justice system, globalization and the environment, their causes, and possible solutions. 

Collective Behavior (Credits: 3) SOCY 354 
An analysis of crowds, publics, social movements, and the mass society in terms of their institutional and social psychological consequences. 

Race, Class, Gender, Sexuality (Credits: 3) WGST 304 
Historical and contemporary power relationships in race, social class, gender, and sexual orientation. 

Senior Capstone Experience (Credits: 3) PALM 401
Senior capstone experience based upon student’s major concentration.

Internship (Credits: 3) PALM 494
Supervised immersion and exploration in a field related to the major, with a career, cultural, or community focus.

Service Learning (Credits: 3) PALM 495
An exploration of theories of service-learning with application of practical solutions to meet community needs.

The Professional Studies emphasis prepares students by offering a well-rounded curriculum for career advancement across the public sector in areas such as government, law enforcement, corporate or healthcare management, and nonprofit.

This emphasis is ideal for students looking to increase their career success and options by furthering their education. 

Business Writing (Credits: 3) ENGL 463 
Extensive practice in different types of business writing, from brief letters to formal articles and reports. 

South Carolina Studies (Credits: 3) PALM 493 
Reading and writing about South Carolina from the perspective of multiple disciplines, incorporating elements of the student’s major and cognate. 

Health Economics (Credits: 3) HSPM 412 
Designed to serve as an introduction to economic principles and applications used in the health sector. The role economics plays in various aspects of health care, demand-side and supply-side factors and issues, how various health care systems are impacted. 

Principles of Management (Credits: 3) MGMT 371 
A comprehensive survey of the basic principles of management applicable to all forms of business. The course provides the student with a basis for thinking about complex business situations in the framework of analysis of the management process. 

Strategic Human Resource Management (Credits: 3) MGMT 374 
A survey of the major approaches used in managing human resources. Covers selection, compensation, legal compliance, discipline, organizational restructuring, TQM, motivation, labor relations, and performance management. 

Employee Engagement (Credits: 3) MGMT 376 
Introduction to human behavior in organizations. Emphasis on factors that contribute to the effectiveness of individuals and groups in organizations. 

Negotiation and Conflict in the Workplace (Credits: 3) MGMT 401 
This course is designed to improve students’ knowledge and skills in the areas of workplace conflict resolution and negotiations. 

International Human Resource Management (Credits: 3) MGMT 406 
This course examines how human resources are managed within a global context. It examines how human resources are managed within global firms as well as across different cultural settings. 

Industrial Psychology (Credits: 3) PSYC 350 
Psychological techniques applied to various industrial problem areas, such as management and supervision, morale, efficiency, training, personnel selection and placement, and relations among personnel. 

Organizational Communication (Credits: 3) SPCH 331 
Examines communication behavior and networks within organizations through the study of major theories of organizational communication, identifies and defines primary concepts, and applies them to organizational scenarios and case studies. 

Senior Capstone Experience (Credits: 3) PALM 401
Senior capstone experience based upon student’s major concentration.

Internship (Credits: 3) PALM 494
Supervised immersion and exploration in a field related to the major, with a career, cultural, or community focus.

Service Learning (Credits: 3) PALM 495
An exploration of theories of service-learning with application of practical solutions to meet community needs.

Public Policy (Credits: 3) POLI 374
Process of and major approaches to making public policy particularly, in the United States. Case study materials will focus on such major policies as welfare, health care, national security, and resource management.

Bureaucracy and Modern Society (Credits: 3) SOCY 312
Bureaucracies in the public and private sector, their internal dynamics and relationship to the social environment.

Introduction to Social Problems (Credits: 3) SOCY 340
Contemporary social issues such as poverty, health, the criminal justice system, globalization and the environment, their causes and possible solutions.

All major and cognate options for this degree can be found in the Bulletin.

 

Area

Education *specialization at the graduate level may be expected

  • Higher Education:
    • Teaching
    • Research
    • Administration
    • Admissions
    • Financial aid
    • Academic advising and student support services
    • Development
    • Alumni affairs
  • Higher education continued:
    • International education and study abroad
    • Residence life
    • Student activities
    • Orientation
    • Leadership
    • Greek life
    • Multicultural affairs
  • Library/information science
  • Primary and secondary education:
    • Teaching
    • Administration
  • Community education:
    • Literacy
    • English speakers of other languages (ESOL)
    • GED preparation
    • Tutoring
Employers
  • Universities and colleges
  • Academic support programs, (e.g., Educational Advancement Program, Upward Bound)
  • School and community libraries
  • K-12 schools, public and private
  • Head Start programs
  • Private learning centers
  • Test preparation organizations
  • Adult education programs (e.g., GED preparation)
  • Museums
  • Nonprofit education organizations:
    • Americorp VISTA
    • Teach for America
    • Peace Corps
  • Language institutes, local and abroad
Strategies
  • Earn a Ph.D. to teach and research at four-year institutions
  • Obtain a master’s degree in student affairs, higher education administration, or library/ information science
  • Fulfill requirements for certification if interested in K-12 teaching, which may involve a double major or a minor.
  • Research alternative paths to teacher certification such as Teach for America and other similar programs
  • Engage in campus leadership programs
  • Join related professional associations as a student member
  • Demonstrate applied competency in oral and written communication
  • Secure strong recommendations from faculty and maintain a high grade point average.
  • Conduct research with a faculty member or take an independent study class to develop research skills
Area

Advocacy

  • Domestic and international Advocacy
  • Humanitarian services
  • Development:
    • Economic
    • Community
    • Housing
  • Disaster/disease Relief
  • HIV/AIDS Advocacy
  • Policy development
  • Program administration
  • Education
  • Volunteer coordination
  • Grant writing
  • Fundraising/development
  • Research
Employers
  • Community action agencies
  • Nonprofit organizations
  • Private voluntary organizations
  • Faith based organizations (FBO)
  • International aid and relief organizations
  • Non-governmental Organizations (NGO)
  • Federal government agencies with an international focus, (e.g., Peace Corps, USAID) or community assistance focus, (e.g., Americorps)
  • State and local government agencies
  • Research organizations
Strategies
  • Engage in extensive volunteer work
  • Participate in service learning experiences
  • Take additional courses in critical theories, global studies, or other relevant areas
  • Develop proficiency in a second or third language
  • Learn how to motivate individuals and groups through on-campus leadership positions
  • Demonstrate applied competency in research, grant writing, communication, and organizational skills
  • Develop and demonstrate global and intercultural fluency
Area

Social Services

*specialization at the graduate level is required

  • Counseling*
  • Psychotherapy*
  • Mental health services
  • Case management
  • Programming
  • Community relations
  • Fundraising/development
  • Administration
Employers
  • Mental health institutions
  • Hospitals and clinics
  • Residential treatment facilities
  • Private and group practice
  • Correctional institutions
  • Federal, state, or local government
  • Public welfare agencies designed to provide services and support to people who are part of marginalized groups
  • Youth organizations and camps
  • Nonprofit and social services organizations that work to enhance the quality of living for specific groups of people
  • Church-based programs
Strategies
  • Take additional courses in psychology, social work, or child and family studies.
  • Earn a graduate degree in psychology, counseling, or social work
  • Gain experience through internships and part-time jobs
  • Volunteer with organizations that assist people of diverse backgrounds
  • Participate in training opportunities (e.g., suicide prevention or crisis hotline response)
  • Acquire knowledge of government and community resources for those in need
Area

Media and Arts

  • Creative writing
  • Freelance writing
  • Copy writing
  • Editing
  • Museum work
  • Arts programming
  • Art sales
  • Research and analysis
  • Fundraising and development
Employers
  • Newspapers
  • Magazines
  • Broadcast media companies including television and movie industry
  • Radio stations
  • Foreign news agencies
  • Trade, professional, or consumer publications
  • Internet marketing sites
  • Advertising agencies
  • Publishing houses
  • Large corporations
  • Museums
  • Galleries
  • Organizations and centers devoted to the promotion of the arts
  • Smithsonian Institution
  • Self-employed, freelance
Strategies
  • Take additional courses in journalism, communications, writing, and marketing
  • Engage with the local arts community
  • Pursue a relevant graduate degree such as museum studies
  • Write for campus publications such as college newspapers, magazines, or newsletters
  • Work at the campus radio or television station
  • Create organizational or departmental social media campaigns
  • Use your interests and communication skills to write about topics of interest for specific publications, (e.g., local sport magazines).
  • Intern with a publishing house, magazine, radio, or television station
  • Create a portfolio of writing samples, especially those that have been published
  • Seek opportunities for recognition and networking through writing contests and freelance writing submissions
  • Become familiar with the proposal and submission process involved in freelance writing
Area

Law and Government *further education required

  • Law*:
    • Corporate
    • Public Interest Law
    • Civil Law
  • Lobbying
  • Government relations
  • Elected or appointed leadership
  • Research
  • Public administration*
  • Intelligence
  • Campaign management
  • Special interest advocacy
Employers
  • Law firms
  • Corporate legal departments
  • Public defenders offices
  • District attorneys
  • Public interest groups
  • Civil rights organizations
  • Legal aid
  • Sole practitioner
  • Government agencies
  • Lobbying groups
Strategies
  • Law: obtain a juris doctorate (J.D.) degree
  • Government: obtain a master’s degree in Public Policy (MPP) or Public Administration (MPA)
  • Participate in activities that develop strong debate and public speaking skills
  • Conduct law and policy research
  • Join the campus pre-law society
  • Gain relevant experience through internships or part-time jobs
  • Maintain a high grade point average and earn strong faculty recommendations
  • Participate in a local, state, or federal government internship program
Area

Business *may require a double major or minor in a relevant area of study

  • Management
  • Customer service
  • Sales and marketing
  • Advertising and public relations
  • Human resources
  • Training and development
  • Equity and diversity functions
  • International business
  • Importing/exporting
  • Travel and tourism
Employers
  • Public and private corporations in various industries:
    • Banks and financial institutions
    • Insurance companies
    • Retail stores
    • Hotels and restaurants
    • Consumer goods manufacturers
    • Multinational businesses
  • Staffing agencies
  • Consulting firms
  • Market research firms
  • Public relations agencies
  • Travel agencies and tour operators
  • Convention and visitors’ bureaus
Strategies
  • Double major or minor in business.
  • Gain business experience through internships or part-time work
  • Join campus organizations or professional societies and hold leadership positions
  • Conduct informational interviews with professionals to learn more about career fields
  • Earn an MBA or a graduate degree in another area of interest for more advanced opportunities
  • Demonstrate professional competencies specific to business-related industries
General Information
  • Liberal studies and humanities provide an interdisciplinary background that helps students develop analytical, critical thinking, and writing skills
  • When paired with a major in another field, humanities can enhance one’s preparedness with a deeper understanding of global cultures and histories
  • Because liberal studies and humanities are interdisciplinary majors, one must develop skills relevant to the targeted areas above through internships and volunteer experiences
  • Graduate education is recommended for these majors which requires a high GPA, established relationships with faculty, research experience, strong letters of recommendations, and relevant experience through volunteering or part-time work
  • Make informed career decisions by conducting informational interviews and job shadowing with professionals in one or more industry of interest
Professional Associations
Occupational Outlook
Related Resources
Employment Opportunities

 

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