UofSC faculty experts: 2020 census



Homes across the country are receiving invitations to complete the 2020 Census, and on April 1, Census Day will be observed nationwide. The census will count every person living in the 50 states, District of Columbia, and five U.S. territories to provide critical data used to provide services and support for local communities. Every year, billions of dollars in federal funding go to hospitals, fire departments, schools, roads and other resources based on census data. The results of the census also determine the number of seats each state will have in the U.S. House of Representatives, and they are used to draw congressional and state legislative districts.

The University of South Carolina’s Office of Communications and Public Affairs has compiled a list of faculty experts who can discuss topics relevant to the 2020 census. To arrange interviews, contact the staff member listed with entry below. Direct questions to Carol Ward, ward8@mailbox.sc.edu, 803-777-7549.

Representation, federal funding and general census information

Kirk Randazzo, professor and political science department chair, can discuss the legal and policy aspects of the census related to constitutional law and how the census translates into potential federal funding, representation and other policy aspects. 
News contact: Bryan Gentry, brgentry@sc.edu, 803-576-7650.

Robert Oldendick, political science professor, can address the importance of completing the form, the role it plays in representation and allocation of funding for federal programs, and concerns that individuals may have about privacy as well as the methodology and accuracy of census data gathering.
News contact: Bryan Gentry, brgentry@sc.edu, 803-576-7650.

Todd Shaw, associate professor of political science and African American studies, is an expert in American racial and ethnic politics, African American politics, urban and local politics and citizen participation. He can comment on the racial and ethnic implications of the census as well as its history and the use of racial and ethnic categories since its inception.
News contact: Bryan Gentry, brgentry@sc.edu, 803-576-7650.

Katrina Walsemann, director of the Carolina Consortium on Health, Inequalities and Populations, is a population health scientist who can discuss the importance of the census for informing us about community, county and state demographics that are used to determine and allocate federal funding and congressional seats and draw congressional and state legislative districts.
News contact: Erin Bluvas, bluvase@mailbox.sc.edu, 843-302-1681.

Jerry Mitchell, director of the Center for Excellence for Geographic Education and a research professor of geography, is an expert on South Carolina geography as well as environmental hazards and recreation and tourism. He can discuss the census as it relates to the people and landscape of South Carolina.
News contact: Bryan Gentry, brgentry@sc.edu, 803-576-7650.

Climate change, transit and social/environmental justice 

Jory Fleming, a research staff member in the University of South Carolina geography department, says the census helps communities prepare for and fight climate change. He can speak about how census data informs plans for mass transit and bike paths, energy demand forecasting and other aspects of sustainable community growth.
News contact: Bryan Gentry, brgentry@sc.edu.

Christopher Krause, a PhD candidate in the geography department, specializes in Geographic Information Systems and geographic education.  He can speak about how census data can be mapped and analyzed; how data influence the allocation of societal resources; and how data are used by social scientists to advocate for social, political and environmental justice.
News contact: Bryan Gentry, brgentry@sc.edu.

Economy and markets

Douglas Woodward, director of the Division of Research and a professor of economics at the Darla Moore School of Business, can discuss economic implications of the 2020 census.
News contact: Leigh-Anne Lawrence, leigh-anne.lawrence@moore.sc.edu, 803-777-4306.

Joseph Von Nessen, a research economist at the Darla Moore School of Business, is an expert on South Carolina’s economy. He can discuss economic implications of the 2020 census.
News contact: Leigh-Anne Lawrence, leigh-anne.lawrence@moore.sc.edu, 803-777-4306.

Christopher Klause, a PhD student in geography, can speak about how census data feeds into geographic information systems that can help businesses, nonprofits, political activists and more to more effectively research their market, supporters and audience in a given region.
News contact: Bryan Gentry, brgentry@sc.edu.

Migration and immigration

Caroline Nagel, chair of geography, can speak about how the census reveals facts about migration and immigration, making a complete and accurate census vital for understanding changes in in the population.
News contact: Bryan Gentry, brgentry@sc.edu.

Family, gender, ethnic and other topics

Jennifer Augustine is a family sociologist and family demographer who studies, teaches and can comment on changes reflected by the census in family configurations and dynamics, including changes in marriage, divorce and cohabitation; changes in fertility; parents' labor force participation; trends in family residence, including children's "return" to the nest and three-generational living; and partnering, marriage and parenthood among same-sex couples.
News contact: Bryan Gentry, brgentry@sc.edu, 803-576-7650.

Caroline Hartnett, a classically trained demographer, can speak about the importance of the census and broad demographic trends with more specialized research in the area of fertility rates and family dynamics. 
News contact: Bryan Gentry, brgentry@sc.edu, 803-576-7650.

Drucilla Barker, a professor of anthropology and women’s and gender studies, can discuss gender questions related to politics, economics and the 2020 census.
News contact: Bryan Gentry, brgentry@sc.edu, 803-576-7650.

Myriam Torres is director of the Consortium for Latino Immigration Studies and a clinical assistant professor of epidemiology and biostatistics in the Arnold School of Public Health. Torres can discuss the census as it relates to growing Latino population in South Carolina and the Southeast.
News contact:
Erin Bluvas, bluvase@mailbox.sc.edu, 843-302-1681.

Robert Brame, professor in the Department of Criminology and Criminal Justice, uses census data to study crime issues and crime rate statistics.
News contact: Bryan Gentry, brgentry@sc.edu, 803-576-7650.

 

 

 


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