Recent Stories

An American flag and SC flag hang behind bright pink flowers out the President's house

University of South Carolina selects leading recruiter for presidential search

July 20, 2021, Jeff Stensland

The University of South Carolina has selected R. William Funk & Associates to assist with its search for a new president, the Presidential Candidate Search Committee’s Chair Thad Westbrook announced Tuesday (July 20). The president of the University of South Carolina serves as the chief executive of the entire University of South Carolina system and of the system’s flagship research university in Columbia.

xiaoming li

Breakthrough Leader: Xiaoming Li

July 14, 2021, Chris Horn

If Xiaoming Li was a professional athlete instead of a public health professor, he would make the All-Star team every year. Since joining the university in 2015 as director of the South Carolina SmartState Center for Health Care Quality, Li has authored or co-authored 179 scholarly publications and instituted an interdisciplinary campuswide Junior Scholar program that has successfully trained 41 doctoral students from different disciplines.

The Maxcy monument stands right of center on the historic Horseshoe, which is green with summer

UofSC releases Title IX Task Force report

July 01, 2021, Larry Thomas

The University of South Carolina’s Title IX Task Force report, which will help guide the university’s efforts to improve its response to sexual harassment and violence, was released by the university today (July 1).

Michelle Dhunjishah and William Hubbard at Children's Law Center

Children's Law Center moves into renovated facility that's ideal for training

June 29, 2021, Chris Horn

It’s been a long time coming, but the Children’s Law Center finally has a permanent home, complete with a mock court room and a mock crime scene apartment for forensic training purposes. Those two assets are vital to the center’s mission of providing training to more than 10,000 professionals in justice, law enforcement and child welfare in South Carolina.

UofSC faculty experts list on the Summer Olympics

June 25, 2021, Tenell Felder

Japan will host the Summer Olympic Games July 23 to Aug. 8. Though the Olympics will be taking place in 2021 due to the COVID-19 pandemic, they will continue to be officially branded as the 2020 Tokyo Olympics. To help journalists report on the Tokyo games, the University of South Carolina has compiled a list of faculty experts.

graphic depicting eyeball

SmartSight project unleashes power of AI to assist blind, visually impaired

June 18, 2021, Chris Horn

Pooyan Jamshidi, an assistant professor of computer science and engineering, is a principal investigator on a three-year $500,000 NSF collaborative grant to develop the intelligence and computing capabilities for a smart device dubbed SmartSight. The platform will enable on-device artificial intelligence to improve real-time perception for blind and visually-impaired users.

Yi Wang

Breakthrough Star: Yi Wang

June 15, 2021, Chris Horn

Simulation and computing is a mainstay in engineering design, a mathematical modeling process that allows engineers to predict the behavior of a machine or system in real-world conditions. But if the datasets are huge and complex, modeling can take days or even weeks to sort out. That’s why Yi Wang is using a method called reduced-order models to speed things up.

Film character Lady of Guadalupe in pink and lace dress and blue shawl over her head

'Lady of Guadalupe' avoids tough truths

June 14, 2021, Rebecca Janzen

The film “Lady of Guadalupe” available on many streaming services, mixes a fictional retelling of the 16th-century appearance of the Virgin Mary to a Mexican peasant named Juan Diego with the tale of a wholly fictional 21st-century reporter. Professor of Spanish and comparative literature Rebecca Janzen writes in The Conversation although the film portrays the story of the Virgin of Guadalupe for a broad audience, ultimately itsanitizes the real-life brutality of the Church toward Indigenous peoples in the 16th century.

Allie Trice will attend graduate school at Oxford thanks to the Barry Scholarship

English, history graduate is first UofSC recipient of Barry Scholarship to study at Oxford

June 14, 2021, Page Ivey

Allie Trice was an outstanding undergraduate student at the University of South Carolina, excelling in class and conducting publishable research. But a dedication to the pursuit of truth is even more important for the university’s first recipient of the Barry Scholarship, which opened the door to graduate school at the University of Oxford.

Van Kornegay with drone

High-flying photography

June 09, 2021, Chris Horn

When Van Kornegay earned his pilot’s license last year, his feet never left the ground, but he paved a runway for students in the School of Journalism and Mass Communications. Kornegay’s FAA drone license opens the door for him to teach a new visual communications course in which students will learn to fly camera-equipped drones that have become a go-to tool in documentary making, news gathering, infrastructure inspection, real estate marketing and more.

damaged beach house

Climate change, coastlands and the most vulnerable who live there

June 03, 2021, Chris Horn

A rising tide might lift all boats, but not everyone fares the same with rising seas. Monica Barra has documented that fact extensively in her studies of coastal land loss among communities of color in the bayous of Louisiana. With a focus on the ways that residents, scientific knowledge and the coastal landscape intersect, the assistant professor of race and environment is bringing a similar research perspective to the South Carolina coastline.

Ten soldiers pose beside a plane in a World War II archive photo.

Documenting UofSC alumni who made the ultimate sacrifice

May 27, 2021, Megan Sexton

James Hull works in the Office of Veterans and Military Services at the University of South Carolina, certifying veteran education benefits for students. He also has taken on a project that combines both his love of history and his military service: Documenting every UofSC student or alumni who died while serving in uniform over the past 120 years.

A woman and a man make the Wakanda gesture. Man holds a photo of actor Chadwick Boseman.

Colorectal cancer screening recommended at age 45 instead of 50 - it's no fun, but it's worth it

May 25, 2021, Franklin G. Berger

Colorectal cancer remains a major source of cancer incidence and mortality worldwide. The American Cancer Society recently estimated that in 2021, there will be 149,500 new cases of colorectal cancer and 52,980 deaths in the U.S. alone. In The Conversation, Franklin G. Berger, professor emeritus in biological sciences, writes about two significant developments that could save lives.

UofSC experts: 2021 hurricane season

May 20, 2021, Tenell Felder

The Atlantic hurricane season officially begins June 1. Top researchers at the University of South Carolina are available to discuss multiple aspects of the 2021 hurricane season, including forecasting, disaster planning and historical perspectives.

Remembering the Days podcast art

Remembering the Days: Heading east

May 20, 2021, Chris Horn

The University of South Carolina experienced enormous enrollment growth in the 1960s and began expanding its campus in several directions. Its move eastward into the University Hill neighborhood greatly expanded the campus footprint, but also stirred tensions with the residents when construction on the high-rise Capstone House began.

shelley Welton

Breakthrough Star: Shelley Welton

May 18, 2021, Page Ivey

Shelley Welton wanted no part of the law after watching her mother work tirelessly in children’s law and come up against structural issues that day-to-day lawyering couldn’t fix. But after getting a master’s degree in environmental policy work, she realized that she needed a better understanding of the law to make progress.

person with dark hair in lab wearing lab coat, blue mask and blue gloves

Operations and supply chain project could save lives in cancer clinical trials

May 14, 2021, Marjorie Riddle Duffie

A project by a team of Moore School operations and supply chain students focused on reducing the time it takes to activate industry-sponsored cancer clinical trials. Their recommendations for more efficient processes could get a patient started on a trial before their cancer becomes terminal, and the treatment could be approved faster by the Food and Drug Administration for eligible patients, saving many more lives.

Eugene Debs, at center with flowers, who was serving a prison sentence for violating the Espionage Act, on the day he was notified of his nomination for the presidency on the socialist ticket by a delegation of leading socialist

Free speech wasn't so free 103 years ago, when 'seditious' and 'unpatriotic' speech was criminalized in the US

May 13, 2021, Eric P. Robinson

The United States government – in the midst of World War I – undertook unprecedented efforts to control and restrict what it saw as “unpatriotic” speech through passage of the Sedition Act of 1918. The restrictions – and the courts’ reactions to them – mark an important landmark in testing the limits of the First Amendment, and the beginnings of the current understanding of free speech in the U.S.

allie salrin

Student finds purpose through campus service

April 23, 2021, Madyn G. Coakley

Senior Allie Salrin came to the University of South Carolina intent on studying international business, but after taking a job in the Office of Student Conduct and Academic Integrity during her first semester, she quickly realized her interest in public policy and service. Salrin is the recipient of the 2021 Undergraduate Student of the Year Award presented by the Association for Student Conduct Administration for her dedication to promoting the values of community, inclusion, integrity and education.

Jabari Bodrick, U101 Teacher of the Year

Forging student connections

April 22, 2021, Chris Horn

It’s a fact that students who complete University 101 at the University of South Carolina do better in their collegiate pursuits. Having Jabari Bodrick as your U101 instructor is icing on the cake. Just ask the students who nominated Bodrick for this year’s U101 Teacher of the Year award.

The Maxcy monument stands right of center on the historic Horseshoe, which is green with summer

UofSC announces May commencement speakers

April 21, 2021, Jeff Stensland

Newly appointed U.S. Secretary of Defense Lloyd J. Austin III, U.S. District Judge J. Michelle Childs, South Carolina Gov. Henry McMaster and S.C. Rep. G. Murrell Smith Jr. will receive honorary degrees and address University of South Carolina graduates during May commencement ceremonies on the Columbia campus.

shawnese cleveland class of 2021

Class of 2021: Shawnese Cleveland

April 20, 2021, Craig Brandhorst

First-generation college student Shawnese Cleveland started her academic career as a political science major, intent on going to law school one day and perhaps working in government. After watching the event staff do their thing during a women’s basketball game at Colonial Life Arena, the Georgia native changed her mind and changed her major. Now, following back-to-back campus internships, the sport and entertainment management major is kicking off her career at a Las Vegas resort.

Remembering the Days podcast art

Remembering the Days: Tales from the President's House, part 1

April 19, 2021, Chris Horn

The President's House on the historic Horseshoe has been home to every university president since 1952. Patricia Moore-Pastides, who lived in the house as university first lady for 11 years, talked with the now-grown children of those former presidents to find out what life was like for them during their years in the President's House.

a plate of cooked vegetables on a bed of rice

Carolina Food Co. offers healthy ways to fuel up for finals

April 17, 2021, Jason Dermack

With final exams on the horizon, your health and wellness should be one of your top priorities and it all starts with eating right. We recently spoke with Tanya Miceli, a registered dietician with the Carolina Food Co., to get her take on how you can make good food choices that satisfy your stomach while also stimulating your brain.

Sydney Womack, graduating senior May 2021

Class of 2021: Sydney Womack

April 15, 2021, Chris Horn

Sydney Womack’s calendar has been booked nearly solid during her four years at South Carolina and little wonder — she majored in biomedical engineering, minored in mathematics, earned a performance certificate in the School of Music, conducted undergraduate research and co-authored a scholarly article and three poster presentations. She also attended football, basketball and baseball games whenever she could, held leadership positions in two engineering student societies and regularly volunteered to pitch STEM career opportunities to high school students.

woman wearing glasses in white shirt with red sweater tied around shoulders and holding a walking stick with foliage in the background

Blind poet's writing brings new beauty into focus

April 15, 2021, Bryan Gentry

Ann-Chadwell Humphries hardly touched poetry before she became blind in 2012. Today, she is immersed in South Carolina’s poetry community, and recently published a book titled An Eclipse and a Butcher. The collection of nearly 40 poems touches on topics ranging from art to family life, from eclipses to blindness. She wrote and workshopped some of the poems in graduate classes at the University of South Carolina.

baseball diamond in Truist Park in Atlanta with rain tarp in place and view of skyline in background

MLB's decision to drop Atlanta highlights the economic power companies can wield over lawmakers - when they choose to

April 15, 2021, Benjamin Means

Over 100 companies publicly denounced Georgia’s new restrictive voting law, Major League Baseball went beyond words by moving the 2021 All-Star Game from Atlanta to Denver. In The Conversation, law professor Benjamin Means writes about how corporations use their economic power as leverage to get what they want from lawmakers.

Jaeseung Kim in a suit and tie

COVID-19 Impact: Gender disparities in pandemic's effect

April 14, 2021, Page Ivey

Jaeseung Kim, assistant professor in the College of Social Work since 2018, studies work and caregiving challenges for low-income parents and how work-family policies, both private and public, can help address such challenges. We asked Kim about how the pandemic has affected men and women differently and how to help those suffering the effects.

Adarsh Shidhaye holding his framed Sullivan Award.

Sullivan award winner's college career exemplifies service

April 14, 2021, Office of Communications and Public Affairs

Adarsh Shidhaye says he “hit the ground running” thanks to a pre-medical summer camp offered by the Office of Pre-Professional Advising. The program was so valuable to him that he started working as an ambassador during his freshman year, providing that same help to incoming students. Shidhaye’s service to his fellow students while earning a degree in public health as well as minors in business administration and medical humanities and culture has also earned him the university's highest undergraduate honor, the Algernon Sydney Sullivan Award.

Payton Ramsey holding her framed Swanger Award.

Swanger award winner uses her drive for hard work to help others

April 14, 2021, Office of Communications and Public Affairs

Payton Ramsey of Hammond, Louisiana, has overcome a visual disability from childhood to become the first member of her family to attend college. The biological sciences major is also a member of the South Carolina Honors College who has spent her time at UofSC perfecting her leadership skills and expanding her mind through research. For her efforts over her four years at South Carolina, Ramsey received the 2021 Steven N. Swanger Award, the university’s second-highest undergraduate honor.

Issy Rushton holding her framed Sullivan award.

Sullivan Award winner helps lead student body through pandemic

April 14, 2021, Office of Communications and Public Affairs

Issy Rushton was installed as president of the student body at the University of South Carolina just as the COVID-19 pandemic was shutting down the world. The native of the Gold Coast in Australia was half a world away when she went to work helping her fellow students and the university navigate the pandemic and focus on returning to campus. For her leadership, Rushton was one of two members of the Class of 2021 to receive the university's highest undergraduate honor, the Algernon Sydney Sullivan Award. The award, named for a 19th-century New York lawyer and philanthropist, is given each year for outstanding achievements, campus leadership, exemplary character and service to the community.

Friendship 9 students who protested against racial discrimination and were put in prison, Rock Hill, South Carolina, February 1961

'Our ultimate choice is desegregation or disintegration' - recovering the lost words of a jailed civil rights strategist

April 14, 2021, Bobby J. Donaldson and Christopher Frear

In 1961, a group that would come to be known as the “Friendship Nine” hoped to reinvigorate the sit-in movement with a “Jail, No Bail” strategy to push the costs of enforcing segregation onto the city, rather than onto civil rights supporters, who paid substantial bail fees every time students were arrested. Bobby Donaldson, history professor and director of the Center for Civil Rights History and Research, writes about the strategy and a 60-year-old letter by activist Thomas Gaither – arrested with the Friendship Nine during a sit-in in Rock Hill, South Carolina – deep in a records box in the South Caroliniana Library.

woman with brown hair, white shirt and navy jacket with a man's hand on her shoulder

Women frequently experience sexual harassment at work, yet few claims ever reach a courtroom

April 14, 2021, Joseph A. Seiner

Sexual harassment at work is a very common occurrence for women, regardless of age or income level. Among women who have experienced unwanted sexual advances in the workplace, almost all reported that male harassers usually go unpunished. Law professor Joseph Seiner writes in The Conversation about the unfortunate reality that engaging in this conduct will result in no real consequences.

Brianna Lewis, 2021 graduating senior

Class of 2021: Brianna Lewis

April 13, 2021, Chris Horn

Brianna Lewis was voted “most likely to become a brain surgeon” in the first grade, and the Simpsonville, S.C.-native will soon begin earning the “Dr.” portion of that prediction. She’s headed to medical school this fall after wrapping up four years in the Honors College and two bachelor’s degrees — one in biology and another in experimental psychology.

The sphere at the top of the Maxcy monument

Major League Soccer and University of South Carolina announce multi-year education partnership

April 13, 2021, Abe Danaher

Major League Soccer and the University of South Carolina announce a historic multi-year partnership making South Carolina an Official Education Partner of MLS. Through the strategic partnership, MLS players and Greats (former players) will have access to online educational opportunities and unique post-secondary academic resources offered through the university system, as well as world-class personal and professional development.