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Center for Teaching Excellence

  • Diversity and Inclusive Excellence

Teaching Towards Inclusive Excellence

The Teaching Towards Inclusive Excellence (TTIE) certificate of completion is an initiative of The Center for Teaching Excellence and the Office of Diversity and Inclusion. The TTIE program is designed to provide an opportunity for faculty, instructors and teaching graduate students to strengthen their strategic diversity leadership capacities both within and outside their classroom and to support USC’s commitment to inclusive excellence.

Program Description

Teaching Towards Inclusive Excellence addresses teaching philosophies and practices by integrating pedagogical principles aligned with inclusive excellence into the classroom environment, course design and assignments that increase awareness of the importance of diversity, equity and inclusion, as well as cultural competence, civic engagement and civil discourse. Key outcomes for participants include obtaining a deeper understanding of the people, practices and initiatives that support and foster diversity at USC, as well as obtaining ideas, strategies and resources that instructors can use to both build their diversity competencies and identify areas of diversity partnership across the institution.

Requirements

Faculty, instructors and teaching graduate assistants who participate in eight or more Teaching Towards Inclusive Excellence approved Center for Teaching Excellence workshops will receive a certificate of completion, a letter of commendation and recognition on the Office of Diversity and Inclusion’s website. Participants will be required to attend the Inclusive Excellence at UofSC workshop and seven (7) electives. Participants will have 3 academic semesters (not including summer semesters) to complete the certificate.

Click on the "+" sign next to each event to see description.

Required Workshops

Come develop a deeper understanding of inclusive excellence and why it is central not only to how we prepare students to lead, but also to how we engage all members of our USC community. Learn about the ways in which the Office of Diversity and Inclusion seeks to operationalize inclusive excellence, as well as how we intend to use our equity and inclusion strategy to track the University’s effectiveness in four primary areas: compositional diversity, achievement, engagement and inclusion.  Register 

Come develop a deeper understanding of inclusive excellence and why it is central not only to how we prepare students to lead, but also to how we engage all members of our USC community. Learn about the ways in which the Office of Diversity and Inclusion seeks to operationalize inclusive excellence, as well as how we intend to use our equity and inclusion strategy to track the University’s effectiveness in four primary areas: compositional diversity, achievement, engagement and inclusion.  Register 

Elective Workshops

Decolonizing your syllabus (and ultimately our entire curricula) requires looking outside of our discipline and the West to engage other scholarship and practices to build a foundation for what decolonization looks like. This workshop will introduce participants to the decolonization movement and demonstrate how it can be applied to our curricula and pedagogy.  Register

This interactive workshop will overview strategies to engender queer visibility in the classroom. First, we will use the lens of queer pedagogy to identify and unpack how our educational practices as faculty normalize and reproduce hetero and cisnormativity. Then, we will discuss some strategies for how queer pedagogy can inform our teaching practices. The workshop will be concluded with an informal question-and-answer session focused on the challenges and messiness faced when implementing these practices. Register

Online courses are becoming increasingly popular at UofSC. As we move toward offering more online courses, students with disabilities may get left behind. Online course accessibility is important as we extend our reach and course offerings to a variety of students near and far. Join this presentation to discuss 7+ tips for creating an accessible online course. After attending the presentation, you will be able to identify and utilize accessibility techniques and strategies in your online courses.  Register

How often have you participated in a discussion and not spoken up as you wanted to do? You were thinking of what you would say, trying to formulate the right words in your mind. Ultimately, however, words failed you, and before you knew it, your chance was gone. Everyone had moved on to a different topic, or the discussion had ended. Your window of opportunity had closed. Perhaps you felt shy, intimated, insecure, or even – let’s face it – afraid. Fear of looking foolish in front of others and even our own self-doubts can prevent us from saying the things we want to say – prudently - in pubic. If you have ever left a discussion wishing you had spoken up, said what you actually wanted to say, and/or stood up for yourself, this workshop is for you.   Register

History and basics of Digital Accessibility.  Register

This workshop will begin with a brief overview of equitable teaching practices in STEM and how those relate to instructor responses to microaggressions. The majority of the time will be spent in small group discussions to devise responses to a variety of scenarios involving microaggressions in STEM classrooms and departments. The workshop will conclude with summarizing positive steps instructors can take to help their classrooms be more welcoming spaces for all students.

BYO (Bring Your Own) Lunch

This workshop is an elective session for a certificate of completion in Teaching Towards Inclusive Excellence.  Register

This presentation will cover an ethnographic study of a hip hop-based music education program for students within elementary school classrooms. Drawing on two years of fieldwork in two urban schools, this case study describes how hip-hop song composition encouraged participants to make essential and critical reflections about media’s place in their personal lives, peer groups, families and communities. The findings of this study suggest that the social and cultural capital of making hip hop music can contribute to bolstering academic learning for Black youth. Implications from this study also suggest informal interests and social identities rooted in inclusive practices like hip hop music can connect youth to high-capacity technological skills, civic-mindedness and critical media literacy that can transcend the classroom experience.  Register

 


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