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Center for Teaching Excellence

  • Graduate Teaching Assistant

Pedagogy Workshops and Events

In our effort to help keep faculty at the forefront of the ever evolving understanding of how students learn and what types of best practices good teachers should engage in, the CTE offers workshops and events that give faculty the building blocks they need in order to engage their students and design good courses that foster student learning.

*Special Notice*

In order for attendees to personally track their current registrations and attendance at CTE workshops and events, CTE requires that registrants create an account in our registration system and login to register.  If you have an existing training account with the Division of Human Resources, Office of Organizational and Professional Development, you do not need to create an account. You can login using your HR training username and password. By logging in to register for CTE events, your complete record for both CTE and HR trainings will be available in a single location with a single account and login. 

View and print CTE training record.


Click on the "+" sign next to each event to see description.

You can choose to use the Calendar View of CTE events if you prefer.

August 2022

Clearly articulating classroom expectations helps to set the foundation for a mutually beneficial course. Research shows that persistence and retention is connected to student's sense of belonging. Furthermore, students who engage in quality interactions with faculty are retained at a higher rate (Astin 1977, 1993). As a faculty member, it is important to assist in developing this sense of belonging and aid in students persistence and retention. This session will cover pedagogical strategies and ways to negotiate positive norms within your classroom to assist you in developing a meaningful academic environment.

This workshop is a required session for a certificate of completion in Fostering Proactive Learning Environments Register

September 2022

Student learning is assessed through a series of measures or assignments, i.e. assessments, implemented by instructors to fully evaluate what students are actually understanding and able to do. Depending on the assessment method used, instructors can measure “in the moment” a student’s level of comprehension, critical thinking, skill development, and achievement of learning outcomes. Not only do good assessments help students learn in tandem with instruction, they also engage students directly with the material and provide feedback to the instructor as to quality of instruction so that corrections can be made as needed.

Assessment types will certainly vary depending on the content, course structure and size, delivery modality, and individual instructor. This session will highlight the breadth and scope of assessment methods, both formal and informal, and best practices for implementation whether in small or large classes, face-to-face or online. Examples used by the facilitator in her own courses will be shown, and participants will engage in activities to help illustrate the value of different assessment types that effectively and objectively measure achievement of different kinds of learning outcomes. Register

Students with a broader social capital are more likely to receive better jobs and higher salaries compared to those who lack social capital and connections. Students of color, first-generation, lower-income, and underrepresented minorities are more likely to lack social capital. As faculty, staff, and individuals who care about students, it is important to understand the need for social capital and find ways to assist in our student social capital development.

Social Capital is one's network. Each relationship is a social currency. Students should invest in their social capital as much as they invest in financial capital. Mentors are an essential part of social capital. Mentor's role is vital to student success and helping them reach the highest potential. Students need to seek mentors who can take them under their wing to inspire and help them develop.

Outcomes of the Session

  • Importance of social capital for students
  • Importance of Mentorship for students
  • How can student develop mentorship relationships
  • How can students find mentors through UofSC Mentorship Hub   Register

To assess the MD program, The School of Medicine, Greenville collects student-generated responses to questions at the end of each individual course and at the end of each academic year. End of course evaluations ask students to rate their instructors and course and assign numerical ratings of effectiveness along with a narrative about the course. End of year evaluations ask students to rate each course, their preparation in academic disciplines for board exams, and clinical preparation. Students’ responses on their experiences are evaluated by program administrators for improvement at the end of each year. This session will review this process in detail and provide insights on the utility of this process.  Register

Between shifting technologies and ever changing approaches to teaching methodologies, how can we best determine if we are teaching to task or to the future? This session will review how to examine and evaluate what content and skills are being taught and introduce the idea of educational expiration dates.

This workshop is an elective session for a certificate of completion in Fostering Proactive Learning Environments.  Register

TruWriter is a simple, multi-user web publishing platform that allows instructors and students to collaborate on innovative publishing projects in the classroom. This session will introduce instructors to the pedagogical uses of open licensing and publishing to engage students in a group publishing initiative. During this workshop, attendees will have an opportunity to interact with practical examples and will learn to use TruWriter as a simple tool to produce web-based student publications.

This workshop is an elective session for a certificate of completion in Fostering Proactive Learning Environments.  Register

Assignments are powerful teaching tools, and their design is one of the most consequential intellectual tasks that faculty undertake as educators. Yet that work is often private and unavailable for collegial exchange and knowledge building. Thoughtfully designed assignments can support program assessment, as well as learning-centered curricular and pedagogical reform and create clearer, more powerful pathways for students. And for faculty, working together on the design of assignments has turned out to be a powerful professional development experience.

Join us for this assignment charrette—a term borrowed from architecture education, denoting a collaborative design process—where you'll engage in a collegial, peer review process of assignment review and design. This workshop will be an opportunity to talk with other faculty interested in trading ideas about the design and use of the various tasks, projects, papers, and performances set for students.  Register

October 2022

The teaching philosophy statement provides a concise description of a faculty member’s teaching approach, methods, and experience. Departments require a teaching philosophy statement as part of the tenure and promotion process.

What is your teaching philosophy? How do you articulate it, and what should you include? In this workshop designed specifically for tenure-track, clinical, and professional faculty, we will discuss the statement’s purpose and strategies for composing or revising the statement, incorporating time for individual brainstorming, group discussion and feedback. Participants will leave with an outline of their statement and guidelines to continue crafting it. Come to this workshop to revise, revamp, and renew your current teaching philosophy statement.  Register

To achieve optimal student learning and integrity in an academic environment, it is essential that instructors understand the importance of maintaining their students' interest and cultivate intellectual autonomy. It is through intellectual autonomy that students can begin to internalize the associated values of integrity and take responsibility over their own learning (Twomey et al., 2009). In the contemporary era of higher education, behaviors connected to cheating and plagiarism have made it a bigger challenge in guiding students to reach the level of intellectual autonomy that instructors would hope for.

Given the new norms and nuances of essay mills and contract cheating, the economics and consumerism related to academic dishonesty continues to expand. In this presentation, attendees will explore how effective teaching and learning strategies will assist in responding to what has become a pedagogical enterprise. Additionally, through these strategies, attendees will improve their teaching and student learning by creating a sense of community and becoming more transparent in their communication with students.

This workshop is an elective session for a certificate of completion in Fostering Proactive Learning Environments.  Register

The Center for Teaching Excellence is pleased to announce the 13th Annual Oktoberbest: A Symposium on Teaching. All UofSC faculty, instructors and graduate teaching assistants are invited to attend this free, in-person, one-day symposium focused on sharing best practices in teaching. At Oktoberbest you'll hear innovative teaching ideas and best practices implemented by your colleagues at UofSC. This teaching symposium features engaging and informative presentations on innovative approaches to teaching, assessments, course design, creative student learning opportunities, and successful implementation of new strategies and best practices.

Oktoberbest is free to all who teach or support teaching at UofSC, but is not open to the general public.  Register

In this session we will discuss the academic misconduct trends we are seeing online and in person with our students. Additionally, we will discuss how to identify and address these common violations while maintaining a productive instructor/student relationship.

This workshop is a required session for a certificate of completion in Fostering Proactive Learning Environments.  Register

In this workshop, graduate students will learn about Imposter Phenomenon (IP) and techniques they can use to address the phenomenon. In particular, participants will gain insight regarding those individuals especially vulnerable to IP, triggers of IP, and the importance of forming community to help deal with IP. Workshop discussions and activities will help students gain a better understanding of how IP may be impacting their graduate school experience, develop an action plan to mitigate the effects of IP, and help participants begin to build community within and across graduate programs.  Register

November 2022

The panel includes practitioners of integrative and experiential learning from various disciplines at UofSC. The panelists will demonstrate how their students put theory into practice by applying what they learned in the classroom to their experiences outside of the classroom and reflecting on the broad range of skills they used, which ultimately prepares them for additional learning experiences within and outside the classroom as well as their future professions.

This workshop is an elective session for a certificate of completion in Integrative and Experiential Learning  Register

We invite faculty, staff, and students to join us for this informal and informative conversation about academic integrity and technology use in the classroom. In this workshop, students and faculty will explore common expectations when it comes to integrity and technology use on the college campus in the 21st century. Find out from students themselves what’s working and what’s not when it comes to this crucial topic. In turn, faculty will be able to share what they expect from students.

We’ll have a FREE lunch for everyone!  Register

The University and many of accreditors that evaluate our individual academic programs often require assessment of the knowledge and skills that students obtain from our programs. But the accreditors often give vague or no guidance on how to actually assess students’ knowledge, leaving it to individual programs and instructors to come up with ways of doing this. Eric P. Robinson and Laura Smith of the School of Journalism and Mass Communications discuss how they have successfully used multiple-choice questions embedded in final exams to accurately measure improvement in students’ knowledge and application of sophisticated concepts.  Register

It’s time to start thinking about your spring course! Have you already started planning your syllabus and have ideas but don't know where to start? Or are you feeling mired down in syllabus details, feeling like you're missing a prime opportunity to rethink and revise important components? You're not alone - and we're here to help! Join other faculty in this two-part in-person workshop series to help you get started or get past your 'stuck points'.

Part 1, 'Review, Revise, Realign” (the Learning Outcomes, Assessments, and Activities) will take you from an initial reviewing of your current course learning outcomes into a discussion of how to ensure they align appropriately with course assessments. What assessments will work better in different types of learning modalities and environments, and what should you reconsider? How will this work with certain class sizes or scenarios? This will be followed by reviewing, revising, and/or redeveloping the associated student activities, both for within and outside-of-class settings.

Both parts of this series will be highly interactive, with other faculty colleague participants playing an important part in contributing ideas and recommendations and producing a positive workshop outcome for every participant. Bounce ideas off each other, hear what others are doing, while following along with the facilitator's steps for development and recommendations. Bring a past syllabus to start working on it as we go through the workshop!  
 Register

Engaging in conflict is challenging whether you are an experienced instructor or new to your role. A likely strategy is to ignore the behavior due to our own discomfort, concern over retaliation or fear that our intervention may cause more harm or disruption. Through case study examples this workshop will explore Gerald Amada's research from Coping with Misconduct in the College Classroomand provide participants with tangible strategies to disruptive behavior in a confident and fair manner.

This workshop is a required session for a certificate of completion in Fostering Proactive Learning Environments.  Register

It’s time to start thinking about your spring course! Have you already started planning your syllabus and have ideas but don't know where to start? Or are you feeling mired down in syllabus details, feeling like you're missing a prime opportunity to rethink and revise important components? You're not alone - and we're here to help! Join other faculty in this two-part in-person workshop series to help you get started or get past your 'stuck points'.

Part 2, 'Planning, Policies, Particulars” (of the schedule, policies, and other important aspects) involves the bigger picture planning stage - how can those assessments and activities fit together, or be organized into a cohesive series of modules as part of a larger whole? What works best with respect to in-person, synchronous, or asynchronous learning? What aspects of activities and assessments need to be considered (e.g. grading, time management), and what else should be included or revised?

Both parts of this series will be highly interactive, with other faculty colleague participants playing an important part in contributing ideas and recommendations and producing a positive workshop outcome for every participant. Bounce ideas off each other, hear what others are doing, while following along with the facilitator's steps for development and recommendations. Bring a past syllabus to start working on it as we go through the workshop!   Register

 


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