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Center for Teaching Excellence

  • Graduate Teaching Assistant

Pedagogy Workshops and Events

In our effort to help keep faculty at the forefront of the ever evolving understanding of how students learn and what types of best practices good teachers should engage in, the CTE offers workshops and events that give faculty the building blocks they need in order to engage their students and design good courses that foster student learning.

*Special Notice*

In order for attendees to personally track their current registrations and attendance at CTE workshops and events, CTE requires that registrants create an account in our registration system and login to register.  If you have an existing training account with the Division of Human Resources, Office of Organizational and Professional Development, you do not need to create an account. You can login using your HR training username and password. By logging in to register for CTE events, your complete record for both CTE and HR trainings will be available in a single location with a single account and login. 

View and print CTE training record.


Click on the "+" sign next to each event to see description.

You can choose to use the Calendar View of CTE events if you prefer.

January 2023

The responsibilities of all instructors typically include grading student work. Yet ensuring that grading is both objective and efficient involves specific strategies and reflection on important considerations in advance, both aspects of which instructors may not be aware. For any level instructor, they need to define what their “grading philosophy” is for the course, and use practices, strategies, and techniques best suited for the specifics of the course and the assessment itself. Grading should be viewed and valued as a method for providing constructive feedback to students, with feedback types differing depending on the assessment type. How to develop your grading philosophy, incorporate relevant techniques, provide effective feedback, along with grading different types of assessment styles and rubric use, will be discussed in this workshop.   Register

Join us for a three-part series of webinars in which you will learn the three Ds of online course instruction: Design, Develop, and Deliver.

In this first of three webinars, we will focus on course design, the forethought and planning that goes into an online course. We’ll discuss how to Design your course to maximize student learning. We’ll cover, Backward Design, alignment, and organizing your course into modules. Factors to consider in Design, such as interactions (between content, instructors, and students) and Chickering and Gamson’s Seven Principles, which outline the foundation for making your online course active, cooperative, and relevant. And, as a bonus for attending, we’ll throw in some handy resources to help you get started!  
Register

Clearly articulating classroom expectations helps to set the foundation for a mutually beneficial course. Research shows that persistence and retention is connected to student's sense of belonging. Furthermore, students who engage in quality interactions with faculty are retained at a higher rate (Astin 1977, 1993). As a faculty member, it is important to assist in developing this sense of belonging and aid in students persistence and retention. This session will cover pedagogical strategies and ways to negotiate positive norms within your classroom to assist you in developing a meaningful academic environment.

This workshop is a required session for a certificate of completion in Fostering Proactive Learning Environments  Register

You may have heard a student comment, “I’m a visual learner so I prefer to watch videos,” which you immediately recognize as a description of their “learning style”. The idea of learning styles holds that by matching instruction to students’ preferred mode of learning or media preferences, students learn better, and there are scores of frameworks categorizing learning styles (visual/auditory/kinesthetic, imaginative vs. analytic, sensing vs. intuition, etc.). But did you know that the idea of learning styles has been definitively debunked in cognitive psychology and neuroscience research literature? The myth of learning styles has been persistent in education for numerous reasons, primarily because for decades, research findings on learning have been incorrectly interpreted, and many practitioners simply don’t know the science that disproves it. Despite the intuitive appeal, there is little to no empirical evidence that learning styles are real.

So as an instructor, what does this mean for your teaching techniques and students’ learning abilities? In this workshop, you will learn about some of the more common learning style models and their fallacies, and apply a model to your own preferences that better illustrates our understanding of student learning abilities (Felder and Silverman, 1988). We’ll also explore some of the cognitive neuroscience behind how students learn, along with techniques and recommendations for being more inclusive in your teaching style to address all abilities, not just specific “learning styles”. A broader teaching approach is needed to improve learning outcomes, one that invites students to reflect on their learning, rather than narrow their style down (Ambrose et. al, 2010).  Register

Part of living a healthy life and caring for personal wellbeing is being mindful about how we spend our time as academics. This workshop will provide participants with tools and training for how to audit our time use and rethink our role as holistic (whole-person) faculty members. This includes revisiting the humanist angle on practices and expectations in the faculty lifestyle: time management, over-teaching, communication and meeting structures, and pedagogical social interactions. The session will provide practical examples of ways that the humanist learning model can be used to help reduce overwhelm for both instructors and students and help us re-orient our pedagogical decisions to refocus on the foundational purpose of education.  Register

Don’t stress! We can help. We will cover best practices for producing lecture videos from your office or home that are both engaging and accessible. We will include tips and resources for making your video content accessible and also provide additional resources available to you here at USC.   Register

According to the CDC, “26 percent (one in 4) of adults in the United States have some type of disability.” However, according to the National Institute for Education Statistics, “A majority of college students with disabilities at both 2- and 4-year institutions do not inform their college of their disability.” This means that the number of disabled students in our classes far exceeds the number of accommodation reports we receive from the Student Disability Resource Center (SDRC), making accessibility a crucial need in every classroom. What can we do to increase accessibility in our classrooms beyond complying with official SDRC requests. Why do some students choose not to disclose? In this presentation we offer answers to these questions by centering the perspectives and experiences of our disabled students.

In addition to offering pragmatic advice for implementing accessibility measures grounded in the principles of Universal Design for Learning and exploring barriers to disclosure, we discuss how to incorporate disabled pedagogy into your course. To paraphrase the late Black feminist scholar bell hooks (1994), disability pedagogy is against all forms of oppression, domination, and repression and is for the development of educational spaces that are safe, inclusive, and liberatory. Furthermore, disability pedagogy takes an intersectional approach to recognizing how multiple identities influence student experience and learning. Drawing upon our own experiences as disabled educators, we examine how disabled pedagogy breaks down traditional student-teacher hierarchies and empowers students to serve as actors in the co-creation of knowledge. Finally, we discuss how to “crip the curriculum” in order to demonstrate to students that disability is an integral part of knowledge production. This session will allow instructors to gain a greater understanding of how to serve their disabled students and create a more accessible and equitable classroom experience.

This workshop is an elective session for a certificate of completion in Teaching Towards Inclusive Excellence  Register

February 2023

Creating an environment of integrity within the classroom truly takes a village. Faculty, administrators, and students all play a role in maintaining an ethical campus community. This workshop will explore preventative tools to address classroom roadblocks.

This workshop is a required session for a certificate of completion in Fostering Proactive Learning Environments.  Register

Excellence is earned, not prescribed. So many of our rubric-driven students are just 'checking boxes' instead of actually learning. How can we break the zombie mold and get into creative, self-reliant modalities? This session focuses on methods to increase student autonomy and personal responsibility through creative syllabi, course design, and incentive models. Participants will discuss and collaboratively brainstorm active learning activities, assignments, and proof-of-knowledge exercises that push students to demonstrate their highest level of achievement, not simply default to what's expected of them.  Register

Join us for the second session in a new three-part webinar series in which you will learn the three Ds of online course instruction: Design, Develop, and Deliver.

This webinar covers how to Develop online course materials. You'll learn the “nuts and bolts” of developing a high quality online course, including how to choose print and video materials, using rubrics to simplify grading, how to best present course information and materials in Blackboard, and techniques for making your online course usable for all students. Register

You may have heard (or uttered) the comments, “My students don’t turn in assignments or don’t show up to class meetings. How do I get my students to care about my class?” Current and upcoming students in higher education have weathered an extreme and singular event – trying to learn in high school and college during a global pandemic, remotely, and more often than not lacking the resources, skills, and learning “toolkits” that pre-pandemic students generally had available for them. Students seem to be disengaged, disinterested, and lacking any real motivation to do well in their classes. And with the constant presence of distractions from technology, students' attention spans are shorter and communication skills are in decline. It feels much more difficult to engage today’s students in the traditional classroom setting.

Fortunately, there are specific strategies that you as an instructor can use to enhance your teaching, engage students from the first class, and maintain that engagement throughout the semester. Learn different techniques to develop a personal connection with your students, encourage preparation and student involvement in your class as well as student investment in their learning, and expect (and receive!) excellence from your students. These strategies to engage students can be applied in small classrooms as well as in large lecture-hall style courses. Join us to learn how to create that positive, engaging learning environment where students “show up” in every meaning of the word. Register

Technology misuse in the classroom has become so pervasive that we must rethink whether our energies should be spent fighting it or whether to work with students on a new paradigm. Yet struggles around technology are also the most obvious symptom of a much larger problem of many students’ inability to focus and the value many of them hold for multitasking.

Based on the recent text: Distracted: Why Students Can’t Focus and What You Can Do About It by James Lang, this break-out session will address the pervasive problem of distracted students, including how to use research on the effects of the technology students use as a distraction (cell phones), or as classroom tools (laptops).

Lastly, in this presentation, attendees will explore the various methods of how to foster better attention from students in the classroom and begin to “shift our thinking away from preventing distraction” (Lang, 2021).

This is an elective session for a certificate of completion in Fostering Proactive Learning Environments.  Register

During this webinar, you will apply practical strategies to redesign components of your course using the principles of Universal Design for Learning (UDL) for course content, activities, and assessments. UDL is a research-based framework that instructors can use to promote inclusivity in course design to improve learning experiences for all students. We will discuss UDL and how you can apply the principle of Representation to course content, the principle of Engagement to course activities, and the principle of Action and Expression to course assessments. Please come to the webinar prepared to discuss your current course content, activities, and assessments.

This is an elective session for a certificate of completion in Teaching Towards Inclusive Excellence.  Register

While persisting social inequalities have always presented challenges for educators, recent rising criticisms of research and the scientific process have made teaching these topics in accurate and meaningful ways difficult. This talk introduces the importance of gender, sex, and sexuality before discussing four barriers to using these identities in the classroom. How educators can transform these barriers into facilitators of critical thought, social constructions, sociopolitical critique, and methodological evaluation will be outlined. This presentation is designed to accommodate participants with limited knowledge of identities as well as those with advanced knowledge.

This is an elective session for a certificate of completion in Teaching Towards Inclusive Excellence  Register

This presentation will focus on the importance of creating a final project that aligns with course goals and is also meaningful and sustainable. It will include tips and tricks, pitfalls to watch out for and best practices. Participants will have the opportunity to learn about a final project that has been implemented, as well as, begin to think of ways to implement this in their own courses.   Register

In this session we will discuss the academic misconduct trends we are seeing online and in person with our students. Additionally, we will discuss how to identify and address these common violations while maintaining a productive instructor/student relationship.

This is a required session for a certificate of completion in Fostering Proactive Learning Environments  Register

Artificial Intelligence(AI) software programs such as ChatGPT powered by OpenAI have been created in an effort to enhance the human experience by eliminating barriers to access to information. AI is a tool that some equate to the creation of the calculator or the internet. This presentation will explain what Artificial Intelligence is as it pertains to its possible use in Higher Education by our students, faculty, and staff. We will also briefly discuss why students may be inclined to use programs like ChatGPT and how we can better adapt our course material to either incorporate the use of AI or make it nearly impossible to use on assignments in the first place. Ultimately, we believe that AI is not the end of Higher Education but, rather it’s a new beginning.  Register

March 2023

Tips and hints on elevating student engagement in the classroom. In this session participants will actively participate in discussion and observe student engagement examples they can implement within their classroom.

This is an elective session for a certificate of completion in Fostering Proactive Learning Environments  Register

Why do you have a syllabus? Do your students even read the syllabus? In this session, you will discuss purposes for the syllabus and how you can use it to convey your clear and concise course design, as well as some strategies to actively engage your students in the syllabus. Using the Transparency In Learning and Teaching (TILT) framework, you will revise your grading and assignments section to guide your students from day one! Please have access to a digital or paper copy of your syllabus in the session.  Register

This webinar covers how to Deliver your online course for maximum impact. Join us to learn how to build rapport with students, foster a community of learners and provide meaningful feedback. The session will end with tips to consider to facilitate an engaging and successful online course.  Register

To achieve optimal student learning and integrity in an academic environment, it is essential that instructors understand the importance of maintaining their students' interest and cultivate intellectual autonomy. It is through intellectual autonomy that students can begin to internalize the associated values of integrity and take responsibility over their own learning (Twomey et al., 2009). In the contemporary era of higher education, behaviors connected to cheating and plagiarism have made it a bigger challenge in guiding students to reach the level of intellectual autonomy that instructors would hope for.

Given the new norms and nuances of essay mills and contract cheating, the economics and consumerism related to academic dishonesty continues to expand. In this presentation, attendees will explore how effective teaching and learning strategies will assist in responding to what has become a pedagogical enterprise. Additionally, through these strategies, attendees will improve their teaching and student learning by creating a sense of community and becoming more transparent in their communication with students.

This is an elective session for a certificate of completion in Fostering Proactive Learning Environments Register

Don’t stress! We can help. We will cover best practices for producing lecture videos from your office or home that are both engaging and accessible. We will include tips and resources for making your video content accessible and also provide additional resources available to you here at USC.  Register

Online courses are becoming increasingly popular at USC. As we move toward offering more online courses, students with disabilities may get left behind. Online course accessibility is important as we extend our reach and course offerings to a variety of students near and far. Join this presentation to discuss tips for creating accessible course content. After attending the presentation, you will be able to identify and utilize accessibility techniques and strategies in your online courses.

This is an elective session for a certificate of completion in Teaching Towards Inclusive Excellence.  Register

April 2023

Engaging in conflict is challenging whether you are an experienced instructor or new to your role. A likely strategy is to ignore the behavior due to our own discomfort, concern over retaliation or fear that our intervention may cause more harm or disruption. Through case study examples this workshop will explore Gerald Amada's research from Coping with Misconduct in the College Classroom and provide participants with tangible strategies to disruptive behavior in a confident and fair manner.

This workshop is a required session for a certificate of completion in Fostering Proactive Learning Environments. Register

Artificial Intelligence(AI) software programs such as ChatGPT powered by OpenAI have been created in an effort to enhance the human experience by eliminating barriers to access to information. AI is a tool that some equate to the creation of the calculator or the internet. This presentation will explain what Artificial Intelligence is as it pertains to its possible use in Higher Education by our students, faculty, and staff. We will also briefly discuss why students may be inclined to use programs like ChatGPT and how we can better adapt our course material to either incorporate the use of AI or make it nearly impossible to use on assignments in the first place. Ultimately, we believe that AI is not the end of Higher Education but, rather it’s a new beginning.  Register

 


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