Stories for Parents

Artist's rendition of ancient buildings made of mudbricks with explosion in sky

A giant space rock demolished an ancient Middle Eastern city and everyone in it

September 21, 2021, Christopher Moore

About 3,600 years ago, a giant space rock exploded in a massive fireball in the atmosphere above an ancient Middle Eastern city. The explosion destroyed the city, killing its 8,000 inhabitants and setting off a massive shockwave that ripped through the city and surrounding areas. University of South Carolina archaeologist Christopher Moore and his colleagues explain for The Conversation how they know how this actually happened near the Dead Sea in Jordan thousands of years ago.

Cartoon drawing of an animal paw holding a cellphone with a drawing of a chicken. Headline

New book puts children in driver's seat for navigating information highway

September 13, 2021, Téa Smith

Children have the internet at their fingertips with phones and tablet, but the ability to discern what’s fact and what’s fiction hasn’t kept pace with advances in technology and accessibility. Faculty and staff in the College of Information and Communications are working to bridge that knowledge gap with a children’s book about news literacy.

The Horseshoe at the University of South Carolina

UofSC retains top spots for first-year student experience, international business

September 13, 2021, Megan Sexton

The University of South Carolina has the top first-year student experience of any public college in the country, according to U.S. News and World Report’s annual undergraduate rankings. UofSC also retained its No. 1 ranking in international business for the 23rd straight year.

Elise Lewis, faculty principal of Capstone Scholars Program

Capstone Scholars faculty principal uses lessons from her own experience to guide living, learning community

September 01, 2021, Chris Horn

When she was a college freshman, Elise Lewis learned firsthand what happens when a student gets lost in the shuffle of a big university. Now, as faculty principal of the Capstone Scholars Program, one of the University of South Carolina’s best-known living and learning communities, Lewis is keen on getting students connected with one another and the university resources that can help them to thrive.

Lizzie Gandy, 1992 mechanical engineering alumna

From Hilton Head to Thunder Horse

August 31, 2021, Chris Horn

Lizzie Gandy one day will regale her grandchildren with stories about the years she strapped on a hard hat and rode a helicopter to her job on the biggest moored oil platform in the world, anchored deep in the Gulf of Mexico. In her latest position, Gandy doesn’t have to endure the same grind as before when she was supervising hundreds of oil platform workers in the open water. But she continues to find satisfaction in the work that a mechanical engineering degree from South Carolina in 1992 made possible.

a woman receives a COVID vaccination

How public health partnerships are encouraging COVID-19 vaccination

August 31, 2021, Brooke McKeever

Journalism professor Brooke McKeever is among four public health and communications experts from Michigan, Indiana, Mississippi and South Carolina who explain for The Conversation how they are teaming up with nonprofits and other partners to encourage more people in their states and local communities to get the COVID-19 vaccine.

archival image of marjorie weber sitting at a desk in education classroom circa 1969

Gamecock family affair

August 23, 2021, Savannah Bennett

Marjorie Weber was a widow in her 40s when she decided to return to college to earn her teaching degree from the University of South Carolina where her late husband had been an education professor. She also served as a starting point for a string of family members attending South Carolina, including a granddaughter and two great-granddaughters, who are current education students. They are among the hundreds of students who follow family members to become Gamecocks each year. 

A male (left) and female (right) smiling while walking in the sun

Going out on the town? Here's how to stay safe

August 19, 2021, Audrey Hill

The start of a new school year brings new adventures, reunions with old friends and all the activities of a bustling campus in the heart of South Carolina's Capital City. Students, particularly those unfamiliar with the Columbia area, should take a few simple precautions to make sure they stay safe while exploring the city and getting to know their classmates.

A photo of the Thomas Cooper Library fountain with a backdrop of campus

What's new on campus?

July 29, 2021, Cam Adams and Audrey Hill

It won’t be long until students pack their bags, get in their cars and make the trip to Columbia to begin another semester at South Carolina. But with a new school year come new things you should know before arriving on campus.

Hudsonian Godwit

Biologist searches for environmental tipping points in marathon migratory species

July 26, 2021, Chris Horn

As a population biologist at the University of South Carolina, Nate Senner studies migratory bird species whose feats of endurance make his own look almost puny by comparison. What interests him most is not just the extremes that different bird species can endure but the many environmental variables to which they must adapt — with the long-term survival of their species population hanging in the balance.

UofSC faculty experts list on the Summer Olympics

June 25, 2021, Tenell Felder

Japan will host the Summer Olympic Games July 23 to Aug. 8. Though the Olympics will be taking place in 2021 due to the COVID-19 pandemic, they will continue to be officially branded as the 2020 Tokyo Olympics. To help journalists report on the Tokyo games, the University of South Carolina has compiled a list of faculty experts.

Film character Lady of Guadalupe in pink and lace dress and blue shawl over her head

'Lady of Guadalupe' avoids tough truths

June 14, 2021, Rebecca Janzen

The film “Lady of Guadalupe” available on many streaming services, mixes a fictional retelling of the 16th-century appearance of the Virgin Mary to a Mexican peasant named Juan Diego with the tale of a wholly fictional 21st-century reporter. Professor of Spanish and comparative literature Rebecca Janzen writes in The Conversation although the film portrays the story of the Virgin of Guadalupe for a broad audience, ultimately itsanitizes the real-life brutality of the Church toward Indigenous peoples in the 16th century.

Van Kornegay with drone

High-flying photography

June 09, 2021, Chris Horn

When Van Kornegay earned his pilot’s license last year, his feet never left the ground, but he paved a runway for students in the School of Journalism and Mass Communications. Kornegay’s FAA drone license opens the door for him to teach a new visual communications course in which students will learn to fly camera-equipped drones that have become a go-to tool in documentary making, news gathering, infrastructure inspection, real estate marketing and more.

A woman and a man make the Wakanda gesture. Man holds a photo of actor Chadwick Boseman.

Colorectal cancer screening recommended at age 45 instead of 50 - it's no fun, but it's worth it

May 25, 2021, Franklin G. Berger

Colorectal cancer remains a major source of cancer incidence and mortality worldwide. The American Cancer Society recently estimated that in 2021, there will be 149,500 new cases of colorectal cancer and 52,980 deaths in the U.S. alone. In The Conversation, Franklin G. Berger, professor emeritus in biological sciences, writes about two significant developments that could save lives.

person with dark hair in lab wearing lab coat, blue mask and blue gloves

Operations and supply chain project could save lives in cancer clinical trials

May 14, 2021, Marjorie Riddle Duffie

A project by a team of Moore School operations and supply chain students focused on reducing the time it takes to activate industry-sponsored cancer clinical trials. Their recommendations for more efficient processes could get a patient started on a trial before their cancer becomes terminal, and the treatment could be approved faster by the Food and Drug Administration for eligible patients, saving many more lives.

Eugene Debs, at center with flowers, who was serving a prison sentence for violating the Espionage Act, on the day he was notified of his nomination for the presidency on the socialist ticket by a delegation of leading socialist

Free speech wasn't so free 103 years ago, when 'seditious' and 'unpatriotic' speech was criminalized in the US

May 13, 2021, Eric P. Robinson

The United States government – in the midst of World War I – undertook unprecedented efforts to control and restrict what it saw as “unpatriotic” speech through passage of the Sedition Act of 1918. The restrictions – and the courts’ reactions to them – mark an important landmark in testing the limits of the First Amendment, and the beginnings of the current understanding of free speech in the U.S.

allie salrin

Student finds purpose through campus service

April 23, 2021, Madyn G. Coakley

Senior Allie Salrin came to the University of South Carolina intent on studying international business, but after taking a job in the Office of Student Conduct and Academic Integrity during her first semester, she quickly realized her interest in public policy and service. Salrin is the recipient of the 2021 Undergraduate Student of the Year Award presented by the Association for Student Conduct Administration for her dedication to promoting the values of community, inclusion, integrity and education.

Jabari Bodrick, U101 Teacher of the Year

Forging student connections

April 22, 2021, Chris Horn

It’s a fact that students who complete University 101 at the University of South Carolina do better in their collegiate pursuits. Having Jabari Bodrick as your U101 instructor is icing on the cake. Just ask the students who nominated Bodrick for this year’s U101 Teacher of the Year award.

The Maxcy monument stands right of center on the historic Horseshoe, which is green with summer

UofSC announces May commencement speakers

April 21, 2021, Jeff Stensland

Newly appointed U.S. Secretary of Defense Lloyd J. Austin III, U.S. District Judge J. Michelle Childs, South Carolina Gov. Henry McMaster and S.C. Rep. G. Murrell Smith Jr. will receive honorary degrees and address University of South Carolina graduates during May commencement ceremonies on the Columbia campus.