Stories for Parents

Visual communications instructor Jason Porter wears headphones and sits in front of a microphone and laptop

Podcast bridges the gap between students and real-world opportunities

October 12, 2021, Matt Edwards

Visual communications instructor Jason Porter knows his students are deserving of the dream jobs they’ve worked hard to prepare for. That’s why he makes careers more accessible to them by welcoming guest speakers into his classroom. When the COVID-19 pandemic put a halt to in-person classes in spring 2020, Porter launched his Let’s Get a Job podcast as a way to continue sharing guest speakers with students.

photo illustration of a woman wearing a ski hat surrounded by floating numbers

Journalism through numbers: Alumna tells stories with statistics

October 05, 2021, Lauren Arabis

If you turned to the internet for insights leading up to the 2020 presidential election, there’s a good chance you’re already familiar with Anna Wiederkehr’s work. Wiederkehr, a 2012 visual communications alumna, is the senior visual journalist for FiveThirtyEight, a website that uses statistical data to explore everything from sports to politics.

Cartoon drawing of an animal paw holding a cellphone with a drawing of a chicken. Headline

New book puts children in driver's seat for navigating information highway

September 13, 2021, Téa Smith

Children have the internet at their fingertips with phones and tablet, but the ability to discern what’s fact and what’s fiction hasn’t kept pace with advances in technology and accessibility. Faculty and staff in the College of Information and Communications are working to bridge that knowledge gap with a children’s book about news literacy.

a woman receives a COVID vaccination

How public health partnerships are encouraging COVID-19 vaccination

August 31, 2021, Brooke McKeever

Journalism professor Brooke McKeever is among four public health and communications experts from Michigan, Indiana, Mississippi and South Carolina who explain for The Conversation how they are teaming up with nonprofits and other partners to encourage more people in their states and local communities to get the COVID-19 vaccine.

archival image of marjorie weber sitting at a desk in education classroom circa 1969

Gamecock family affair

August 23, 2021, Savannah Bennett

Marjorie Weber was a widow in her 40s when she decided to return to college to earn her teaching degree from the University of South Carolina where her late husband had been an education professor. She also served as a starting point for a string of family members attending South Carolina, including a granddaughter and two great-granddaughters, who are current education students. They are among the hundreds of students who follow family members to become Gamecocks each year. 

Van Kornegay with drone

High-flying photography

June 09, 2021, Chris Horn

When Van Kornegay earned his pilot’s license last year, his feet never left the ground, but he paved a runway for students in the School of Journalism and Mass Communications. Kornegay’s FAA drone license opens the door for him to teach a new visual communications course in which students will learn to fly camera-equipped drones that have become a go-to tool in documentary making, news gathering, infrastructure inspection, real estate marketing and more.

Eugene Debs, at center with flowers, who was serving a prison sentence for violating the Espionage Act, on the day he was notified of his nomination for the presidency on the socialist ticket by a delegation of leading socialist

Free speech wasn't so free 103 years ago, when 'seditious' and 'unpatriotic' speech was criminalized in the US

May 13, 2021, Eric P. Robinson

The United States government – in the midst of World War I – undertook unprecedented efforts to control and restrict what it saw as “unpatriotic” speech through passage of the Sedition Act of 1918. The restrictions – and the courts’ reactions to them – mark an important landmark in testing the limits of the First Amendment, and the beginnings of the current understanding of free speech in the U.S.

UofSC home to 60 ranked programs

UofSC med school leads nation for grads practicing in underserved areas

March 30, 2021, Megan Sexton

The School of Medicine Columbia is the top medical program in the country for graduates who are practicing in areas where there is a shortage of health care professionals, according to the latest U.S. News & World Report’s Best Graduate School rankings. The rankings also show that UofSC is now home to more than 60 nationally ranked programs.

Woman with gray hair, gray shirt and black mask standing at a table, displaying health items. Man and woman at table with back to viewer.

Researchers to help LGBTQIA+ populations navigate barriers to health information

March 09, 2021, Rebekah Buffington Friedman

Health disparities are common in LGBTQIA+ populations, in part because discrimination makes health information harder to come by. Over the next two years, a team of researchers from the University of South Carolina’s School of Information Science and Arnold School of Public Health will collaborate to recruit, learn from and develop specialized training for LGBTQIA+ community health workers.

colorful graphic with the words fact and myth

UofSC faculty work to counteract the emotional power of misinformation

January 14, 2021, Carol JG Ward

Misinformation and disinformation circulated, consumed and believed by the public have a powerful influence on public opinion — often in a harmful way. Faculty members in the College of Information and Communications have conducted research to help improve media literacy, to teach people how to evaluate quality sources and to recognize clues for misinformation.

desktop with laptop and notepad describing

7 things to know in the fight against 'fake news'

December 03, 2020, Rebekah Friedman

If you’ve ever come across a story or image or video online and thought to yourself, “There’s no way this is real,” there’s a good chance you were right. Fake news is a growing threat, and advances in technology are making it harder to spot. Two researchers in the College of Information and Communications discuss what it is, how it works and what can be done to address it.

UofSC alumna Leeza Gibbons reads a story on video for Cocky's Reading Express

Bird watching: UofSC literacy efforts go virtual during COVID-19

August 26, 2020, Rebekah Friedman

COVID-19 has meant putting a hold on in-person programming, but Cocky’s Reading Express hasn’t stopped – it’s gone online. Since April, its Virtual Storytime YouTube playlist has featured a line-up of guest readers, including former mascots, Miss Gamecock 2020, and even famed talk show host and University of South Carolina alumna Leeza Gibbons.

book covers including the graphic novel Maus

Graphic novels help teens learn about racism, social justice and climate change

June 12, 2020, Karen Gavigan

Because the combination of text and images in graphic novels can communicate issues and emotions that words alone often cannot, more educators and parents are finding them to be effective tools for tackling tough issues with kids. In early March, information science professor Karen Gavin shared a collection of books for The Conversation, including some that can educate children about racism and other forms of bigotry.

Paige Fallon

The study abroad experience that, ultimately, helped save a life

May 28, 2020, Chris Horn

This past spring semester, Paige Fallon began a study abroad experience in Europe, then got sick with COVID-19 and ended up in quarantine back home in Ohio. But the rising senior made the most of her experience after recovering from the virus that has killed some 350,000 worldwide — she helped save a life.

women's soccer celebrating with the SEC championship trophy
James Ellroy

Student lands interview with acclaimed crime writer

October 29, 2019, Office of Communications and Public Affairs

In October, crime novelist James Ellroy visited the University of South Carolina for the 2019 Fall Literary Festival, sponsored by University Libraries and the English department. On his last day on campus, Ellroy sat down with junior English and theater major Susan Swavely for an interview at the School of Journalism and Mass Communications’ Kennedy Greenhouse Studio.

A large Gamecock family smiles at the photographer while standing against the background of Williams-Brice Stadium in the distance

Family Weekend plays important role in student support

September 25, 2019, Annika Dahlgren

Family Weekend is part of the university’s wide-ranging commitment to delivering a superior student experience in a welcoming, inclusive environment. It helps to connect a student’s personal support network to the university experience, so that family members can feel engaged in a student’s journey — and a student can feel a deep level of support both on- and off-campus.

artificial intellingence illustration

Turning big data into smart data

May 29, 2019, Chris Horn

A new Artificial Intelligence Institute at the University of South Carolina will launch this summer, building on and harnessing the collective efforts of dozens of faculty members who already are advancing AI research initiatives in diverse academic disciplines.

Miracle Kid Ellington Hewitt at Dance Marathon 2018

For the Kids

February 28, 2019, Allen Wallace

A year ago, University of South Carolina Dance Marathon made history, raising more than a million dollars for the kids at Prisma Health Children’s Hospital (then known as Palmetto Health). Just days after that success, they began working to do it again. That yearlong effort concludes Saturday with the student organization’s annual Main Event.

Caitlyn Jennings in Bolivia

Passport to success

February 19, 2018, Mary-Kathryn Craft

Global studies, one of the University of South Carolina’s newest and fastest growing majors, equips students to lead in our increasingly connected world. An interdisciplinary program housed in the College of Arts and Science, global studies is home to 125 undergraduates who focus on humanities paired with intensive language study and courses in professional schools.

Lava flows in the Galapagos

Gamecocks in the Galápagos

October 16, 2017, Allen Wallace

For the second year in a row, UofSC is taking students to one of the rarest classrooms in the world: the Galapagos Islands. The cross-disciplinary study abroad program offers diverse lessons, but the overarching theme is sustainability.

Senior Ben Youngblood

Senior wisdom

May 23, 2017, Megan Sexton

Freshmen arrive on campus each fall curious, excited and sometimes a little nervous about the road ahead. By graduation, they’re often completely different people. We asked four seniors at the end of their college careers about how the college experience had changed them and what it has meant to have that experience at Carolina

Year end review

Twenty-Sixteen: By the Letters

December 15, 2016, USC Times

A is for alphabet, at least according to USC Times. To help close out 2016, the University of South Carolina’s monthly magazine for faculty and staff devoted its entire December issue to the ABCs of 2016 — with each letter representing a different accomplishment, announcement or notable arrival from the past year.

Brittany VanderBeek

A revolutionary rivalry

November 18, 2016, Jo Jo Winkelmann

Graduate business student Brittany VanderBeek was put on a project of epic proportions during her internship at Michelin: Bring Carolina and Clemson students together to help reduce waste at a tire manufacturer. Next semester, the first joint class of students will begin working on solutions thanks to VanderBeek's hard work.