Recent Stories

UofSC experts: 2020 hurricane season

May 13, 2020, Carol J.G. Ward

The Atlantic hurricane season officially begins June 1. Top researchers at the University of South Carolina are available to discuss multiple aspects of the 2020 hurricane season, including forecasting, disaster planning and historical perspectives. To coordinate an interview, contact the staff member listed with each expert entry.

Rebekah Cloninger

Class of 2020: Senior takes a flying leap toward career serving others

May 10, 2020, Chris Horn

Rebekah Cloninger has a lot to tell her future children and grandchildren about her time at the University of South Carolina. Like the night she met A’ja Wilson, the Most Outstanding Player from the 2017 championship team, and got her jersey signed by the former UofSC forward who now plays for the Las Vegas Aces.

protester holds sign calling to close the border

COVID-19 impact: Language differences spark fear amid pandemic

May 08, 2020, Stanley Dubinsky, Kaitlyn E. Smith, Michael Gavin

As the coronavirus spreads around the globe, it can cause a fear of others, especially strangers, who may or may not have taken proper precautions against spreading the disease. This fear can cause people to be on heightened alert for anyone who might be different. English professors Stanley Dubinsky, Michael Gavin and doctoral student Kaitlyn Smith write for The Conversation about how language differences can contribute to discrimination.

ruins of the lumber mill that are now visible on the shores of Lake Marion

Class of 2020: Honors senior's thesis project explores history of a former SC mill town

May 07, 2020, Carol J.G. Ward

When 89-year-old Richard Mims was just a boy in the 1930s, he remembers playing a game he called “Executive” in the abandoned offices of the Santee River Cypress Lumber Co. in Ferguson near his hometown of Eutawville, South Carolina. The once-thriving mill town now lies underwater, part of the region flooded to create Lake Marion. Mims shared his memories in an oral history recorded by South Carolina Honors College graduate Caldwell Loftis.

graphic with multicolored lines to show spread of COVID-19

COVID-19 impact: Coronavirus genome allows epidemiologists to track where it's been

April 27, 2020, Bert Ely and Taylor Carter

Following the coronavirus’s spread through the population – and anticipating its next move – is an important part of the public health response to the new disease. Biological sciences professor Bert Ely and doctoral student Taylor Carter write for The Conversation on how the virus's genetic sequence provides insight into where the virus has been.

Close up of several gardening pots with vibrant green sprouts.

Staying green while staying apart

April 16, 2020, Caleigh McDaniel

Prior to campus’s closure, the Student Council on Sustainability, a representative body of all sustainability leaders in several student organizations, were planning a week full of programming for Earth Day on Greene Street called Green on Greene Week. Now, the council has adjusted their plans to create Virtual Green Week.

breakthrough leader dawn wilson-king

Breakthrough Leader: Dawn Wilson-King

April 13, 2020, Chris Horn

Dawn Wilson-King has devoted her career to helping people pursue active and healthy lifestyles, and what a career it’s been. Since 2001, the psychology professor has collaborated on more than 30 grant-funded projects that brought some $40 million in grant funding to the University of South Carolina and she served as president of two prominent national organizations.

booker t washington auditorium building

Popular UofSC civil rights exhibit will have a permanent home

April 09, 2020, Carol J.G. Ward

The university will continue rehabilitation and preservation of the Booker T. Washington Auditorium Building to create a permanent space for the Center for Civil Rights History and Research’s exhibit “Justice for All: South Carolina and the American Civil Rights Movement.” Funded with a $500,000 grant from the National Park Service, the restoration will advance efforts to create a destination for people to learn the history of Columbia and of the school.

UofSC faculty experts on coronavirus

March 17, 2020, Carol J.G. Ward

The University of South Carolina’s Office of Communications and Public Affairs has compiled a list of faculty experts who can discuss topics relevant to the coronavirus pandemic.

AI Institute

Intelligence, all over campus

March 05, 2020, Megan Sexton

While artificial intelligence research and programs are growing around the country, the University of South Carolina’s AI Institute is among the first in the Southeast to include diverse colleges and departments.

Julia Whitehead

UofSC alumna Julia Whitehead makes writer Kurt Vonnegut's legacy more accessible than ever

February 25, 2020, Craig Brandhorst

Indiana native Kurt Vonnegut, who died in 2007, was one of the country’s most celebrated writers, authoring such classics as Slaughterhouse-Five and Breakfast of Champions. But there was no place devoted to celebrating his work — until UofSC alumna Julia Whitehead got involved. Whitehead founded the Kurt Vonnegut Museum and Library in 2011. Last year, the museum moved to a new space in downtown Indianapolis.

newspaper clippings showing the historical images of the wall being built around the horseshoe

Podcast Episode 2: The Great Wall of Carolina

February 18, 2020, Chris Horn

It's nearly seven feet tall, 3,000 feet long and is made of 160,000 bricks. And it's older than half of the buildings on the University of South Carolina's historic Horseshoe. It's the campus wall, a structure that never succeeded in its original purpose — keeping mischievous 19th century students on campus. But during one tumultuous night in 1865, the wall very likely saved the campus from a fire that consumed one-third of the surrounding city.

iwo jima medical

75 years later, film collection enriches history of WWII

February 18, 2020, Carol J.G. Ward

The University of South Carolina’s Moving Image Research Collections in a partnership with the History Division of the Marine Corps is digitizing films shot by more than 50 Marine combat cameramen during the Battle of Iwo Jima, which began Feb. 19, 1945. The goal is to provide public access to the video and expand historical understanding.

research collaboration-books

Working across disciplines, university researchers pursue fresh perspectives

February 17, 2020, Chris Horn

UofSC's research office offers internal grant funding up to $100,000 for proposals that include faculty members from three or more disciplines. Colin Wilder, Matthew Brashears and John Rose are using one of these grants to comb through millions of digital library records to explore three centuries of European book publishing.

Salt marsh at Baruch Institute

Window to the Sea

January 14, 2020, Megan Sexton

The university’s Belle W. Baruch Institute for Coastal and Marine Sciences is a national treasure -- a place where students and researchers from the Columbia campus along with universities around the world come to better understand the complexity of coastal and marine environments.

William Shakespeare

Shakespeare by the numbers

January 06, 2020, Chris Horn

“We know what we are,” Shakespeare once wrote, “but know not what we may be.” If only the old Bard could have sat in on “Mathematics for Shakespeare,” an Honors College course at the University of South Carolina. He would have learned how to take the full measure for measure of his own literary works, using statistical software and linear algebra to probe and pose questions about everything from his sonnets to soliloquies.

Neema Patel and the Gibbs Family

Scholarship transforms heartbreak into hope

December 11, 2019, Margaret Gregory

In 2002, 8-year-old Wanda Gibbs died after being hit by a car at her bus stop. After her tragic passing, the community came together and launched a fundraising initiative to ensure Wanda’s memory would live on. Their efforts established the Wanda Gibbs Scholarship at the University of South Carolina School of Medicine Columbia, which was awarded for the first time earlier this year.

James Cutsinger

Professor helped students find the light within

December 02, 2019, Chris Horn

Not many professors inspire lofty tribute. Some we forget and others are scarcely remembered. James Cutsinger, a religious studies professor who taught at the university for 37 years, earned the respect and admiration of students for decades while helping them to achieve the most noble of goals: the ability to think.

women's soccer celebrating with the SEC championship trophy
Kathy Carroll

Alumna takes reins as president of national school librarians association

November 11, 2019, Megan Sexton

School librarian Kathy Carroll likes to be in the middle of the action and that’s where she finds herself every day, whether it’s helping students at Westwood High School in Blythewood or advocating for her profession as president-elect of the American Association of School Librarians.

brick path near Gibbes Green

First-generation students, faculty and alumni reflect on their college experiences

November 05, 2019

Attending college is a transformative experience, offering students the opportunity to gain the knowledge, skills and experiences that lead them to a fuller life. We spoke to first-generation college students, faculty and alumni to learn about their experiences on campus and beyond.

James Ellroy

Student lands interview with acclaimed crime writer

October 29, 2019, Office of Communications and Public Affairs

In October, crime novelist James Ellroy visited the University of South Carolina for the 2019 Fall Literary Festival, sponsored by University Libraries and the English department. On his last day on campus, Ellroy sat down with junior English and theater major Susan Swavely for an interview at the School of Journalism and Mass Communications’ Kennedy Greenhouse Studio.

Juan Tellez

Meet new faculty: Juan Tellez

October 28, 2019, Chris Horn

For Juan Tellez, a new assistant professor of political science at the University of South Carolina, conflicts within countries and peace agreements associated with them aren’t merely an academic interest. The native Colombian saw first-hand what violent conflict can do to a country.

Joyce Hansen

Award-winning SC author Joyce Hansen featured at Fall Literary Festival

October 10, 2019, Annika Dahlgren

When Joyce Hansen, an award-winning young adult author, was learning to read, she and her mother picked up "Alice and Wonderland" and read it over and over again. Those early reading experiences inspired her passion for storytelling, a joy that turned into a career. Hansen is among a trio of authors coming to campus for this month's Fall Literary Festival.

Year of the fish

October 03, 2019, Chris Horn

Add this to the growing list of side effects wrought by climate change — fish in parts of the warming Atlantic Ocean are growing faster. That might seem like a good thing, but two fish biologists at the University of South Carolina say the phenomenon of younger, bigger fish could muddy the waters of vital fisheries management.

Wonder Woman

Telling the American story -- through comics

September 30, 2019, Carol J.G. Ward and Joshua Burrack

With a massive donation of comics from Gary Lee Watson in the spring of 2019, the University of South Carolina is becoming an intellectual center for the study of 20th century popular culture. “The acquisition has made the Irvin department one of the nation's top public repositories of comic books, positioning the University of South Carolina as a premier institution for comics studies,” says Elizabeth Sudduth, associate dean for special collections in University Libraries.

A large Gamecock family smiles at the photographer while standing against the background of Williams-Brice Stadium in the distance

Family Weekend plays important role in student support

September 25, 2019, Annika Dahlgren

Family Weekend is part of the university’s wide-ranging commitment to delivering a superior student experience in a welcoming, inclusive environment. It helps to connect a student’s personal support network to the university experience, so that family members can feel engaged in a student’s journey — and a student can feel a deep level of support both on- and off-campus.

Portrait of Amanda Fairchild

Mungo Teaching Award: Amanda Fairchild

September 13, 2019, Craig Brandhorst

If you think you hate statistics or they make you nervous, you might just be the perfect student for Amanda Fairchild. The associate professor of psychology is out to demystify statistics for University of South Carolina master’s and Ph.D. candidates, who need Fairchild’s courses to complete their degrees but do not always see themselves as numbers people.

Myisha Eatmon

Meet new faculty: Myisha Eatmon

September 13, 2019, Page Ivey

Myisha Eatmon has joined the university as a research fellow in the history department and will begin as an assistant professor of African American history in fall 2020. The North Carolina native's research focuses on black legal culture in the face of white-on-black violence under Jim Crow and black civil litigation’s impact on civil law.

map of South Carolina with UofSC Alumnni mayor's cities pinned

Keys to the City

August 05, 2019, Craig Brandhorst and Megan Sexton

You don’t need a degree from the University of South Carolina to get elected mayor in the Palmetto State, but it certainly doesn’t hurt. This summer, Carolinian magazine traveled the state, from the Lowcountry to the Upstate, from the Midlands to the Pee Dee, interviewing South Carolina alumni who hold the esteemed office.

2015 flood

Disaster research

July 29, 2019, Megan Sexton

From a thousand-year flood to deadly hurricanes, South Carolina is no stranger to disasters. That’s why University of South Carolina researchers are working to better understand why dams fail, how to quickly map disaster areas and ways to improve how people with disabilities navigate natural disasters.

Daniel Speiser

Eyes of the scallop

July 26, 2019, Megan Sexton

When Daniel Speiser tells people that he studies the structure, function and evolution of eyes, they typically envision two eyes on one head. But Speiser, an assistant professor of biological sciences in the College of Arts and Sciences, specializes in marine invertebrates with many eyes — sometimes hundreds of eyes distributed across their bodies.

Tim Mousseau

Breakthrough Leader: Tim Mousseau

July 12, 2019, Page Ivey

One way or another, most life on Earth is affected when one of humanity’s most volatile inventions — the nuclear power plant — catastrophically fails. Biology professor Tim Mousseau leads a team of researchers studying the impact of radiation released from those disasters on animal life, including insects, birds, dogs and humans who live near the failed power plants.

Jefferson in class with her students

Education alumna wins SC Teacher of the Year

June 06, 2019, Kathryn McPhail

Education alumna, Chanda Jefferson, was recently named the 2020 South Carolina Teacher of the Year. Her passion for serving others began when she drove the church van as a teenager. Now a decade into her career as an educator, she finds herself teaching much more than biology to her students.

adriana bowman camel

First-generation student takes on the world

April 29, 2019, Carol J.G. Ward

Honors College junior Adriana Bowman is one of 30 recipients nationwide of the Pickering Fellowship awarded to students interested in a foreign service career. Multiple study abroad experiences have allowed the S.C. native to immerse herself in foreign languages and cultures.

three award winners

UofSC honors top students at Awards Day

April 18, 2019, Page Ivey

The University of South Carolina presented its top student honors, the Algernon Sydney Sullivan and Steven N. Swanger awards, to three graduating seniors during the university’s annual Awards Day ceremony Thursday on the historic Horseshoe.