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College of Information and Communications

College of Information and Communications

Archives - Research Roundup

2022

BOOK/BOOK CHAPTER

CLAYTON COPELAND, KAREN GAVIGAN, SAMANTHA K. HASTINGS, DICK KAWOOYA, KIM THOMPSON, and LINDA LUCAS WALLING

Citation: Copeland, C.A. (Ed.). (2022). Disabilities and the library: Fostering equity for patrons and staff with differing abilities. ABC-CLIO.

Abstract: Librarians need to understand the needs and abilities of differently abled patrons, and anyone responsible for hiring and managing librarians must know how to provide an equitable environment. This book serves as an educational resource for both groups.

Understanding the needs and abilities of patrons who are differently abled increases librarians’ ability to serve them from childhood through adulthood. While some librarians are fortunate to have had coursework to help them understand the needs and abilities of the differently abled, many have had little experience working with this diverse group. In addition, many persons who are differently abled are—or would like to become—librarians.

Disabilities and the Library helps readers understand the challenges faced by people who are differently abled, both as patrons and as information professionals. Readers will learn to assess their library’s physical facilities, programming, staff, and continuing education to ensure that their libraries are prepared to include people of all abilities. Inclusive programming and collection development suggestions will help librarians to meet the needs of patrons and colleagues with mobility and dexterity problems, learning differences, hearing and vision limitations, sensory and cognitive challenges, autism, and more. Additional information is included about assistive and adaptive technologies and web accessibility. Librarians will value this accessible and important book as they strive for equity and inclusivity.

Features:
Identifies the differently abled who are patrons and employees in libraries
Details the needs and abilities of a special clientele
Encourages the interest of management in hiring applicants who are differently abled
Includes chapters written by working librarians, educators, and researchers
Offers advice to strengthen services, programming, collection development, accessibility, and legal compliance

Link: https://www.abc-clio.com/products/a5549p/

KIM THOMPSON

This chapter overviews a model of inclusion that can help organizations in decision-making for an inclusive workplaces, including decisions about hiring practices and the design and support of inclusive workplace cultures once a hire is settled.

Citation: Thompson, K. M., Jaeger, P. T., & Copeland, C.A. (2022). A tripartite approach to designing an inclusive hiring experience and an inclusive workplace. In C. A. Copeland (Ed.). Disabilities and the library: Fostering equity for patrons and staff with differing abilities. ABC-CLIO. https://www.abc-clio.com/products/a5549p/

Abstract: Inclusive workplaces start with inclusive hiring practices and then the design and support of inclusive workplace cultures once a hire is settled. The process includes consideration of why you are looking for diverse candidates, writing inclusive job descriptions and job ads, inclusive interviewing considerations, and building an inclusive work environment and culture. Each of these considerations can be examined through a tripartite approach, exploring ways to ensure physical, intellectual, and social needs are addressed and met throughout each stage of the hiring and retention process.

KIM THOMPSON

Chapter in Clayton Copeland's recent book: Disabilities and the Library. Inclusive workplaces start with inclusive hiring practices and then the design and support of inclusive workplace cultures once a hire is settled. The process can be examined through a tripartite approach, exploring ways to ensure physical, intellectual, and social needs are addressed and met throughout each stage of the hiring and retention process.

Citation: Thompson, K. M. & Jaeger, P. T. (2022). A tripartite approach to designing an inclusive hiring experience and an inclusive workplace. In C. A. Copeland (Ed.). Disabilities and the library: Fostering equity for patrons and staff with differing abilities. ABC-CLIO.

Abstract: Inclusive workplaces start with inclusive hiring practices and then the design and support of inclusive workplace cultures once a hire is settled. The process includes consideration of why you are looking for diverse candidates, writing inclusive job descriptions and job ads, inclusive interviewing considerations, and building an inclusive work environment and culture. Each of these considerations can be examined through a tripartite approach, exploring ways to ensure physical, intellectual, and social needs are addressed and met throughout each stage of the hiring and retention process.


CONFERENCE PAPER

DAVID MOSCOWITZ

Presented at National Communication Association annual meeting (Political Communication division), New Orleans, Louisiana; November 20, 2022. I study media discourses that position cultural and social anxieties with particular attention on affect and trauma, cultural politics of identity, gender, intercultural/intergroup representation, Jewish identity and (post)assimilation, and media and film criticism.

Citation: Moscowitz, David. “The Postassimilationist Performativity of Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy.”

Abstract: Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy and Russian President Vladimir Putin have presented the world with contrasting styles of media projection dating to Russia’s February 2022 invasion of Ukraine. I regard Zelenskyy’s media use as a model for effective postmodern argument by employing a postassimilationalist positioning of his Jewish identity. Zelenskyy negotiates a liminal space that distinguishes social constraint and construction to invite qualities of argumentative identification that reify how “becoming-Jewish necessarily affects the non-Jew as much as the Jew” (Deleuze and Guattari 291).

LINWAN WU and CHANG-WON CHOI (Ph.D. alumnus)

Citation: Choi, C-W., & Wu, L. (2023, March). Why are sad or touching video ads shared? The power of emotional intensity. Paper accepted to present at 2023 AAA Annual Conference, Denver, CO.

LINWAN WU and CHANG-WON CHOI (Ph.D. alumnus)

Citation: Choi, C-W., & Wu, L. (2023, March). Predicting shares of YouTube video ads by analyzing expressed emotions from user comments. Paper accepted to present at 2023 AAA Annual Conference, Denver, CO.

LINWAN WU and TAYLOR WEN

Citation: Wu, L., Dodoo, N. A., & Wen, T. J. (2023, March). How does disclosing AI’s involvement in advertising influence consumer responses? A task-dependent perspective. Paper accepted to present at 2023 AAA Annual Conference, Denver, CO.


JOURNAL ARTICLES

LEIGH MOSCOWITZ, JANE WEATHERRED (Ph.D. alumna), and ROBERT MCKEEVER

Despite decades of research, public misperceptions persist when it comes to the threat of child abductions in the US. For example, while child abductions are rare, research has found that as high as 72% of US parents fear that their child will be abducted. Much of what we learn about this crime comes from media reports, which tend to over exaggerate the threat of abduction. Therefore, our study is one of the first experiments to test whether specific kinds of child abduction news stories influence parental perceptions of kidnapping.

Citation: Weatherred, J. L., & Moscowitz, L. (2022). Exemplification of child abduction in US news media: Testing media effects on parental perceptions and assessment of risk. Journal of Experimental Criminology, 1-20.

Abstract: The objective of this study is to advance the literature on exemplification theory and how media coverage can impact public perceptions of crime. This 3-condition, between-subjects experimental design tests whether specific child abduction news stories influenced parental concerns, in particular their estimation of the likelihood of the crime as a threat in their own communities and for their own families. The level of proximity may explain why parents exposed to the extreme news exemplar perceive child abductions to be a problem in their own community, but not necessarily perceive the crime as a personal threat likely to happen to one’s own child or family. Theoretical and practical implications about news coverage and its impact on public perceptions of crime are discussed.

Link: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11292-022-09535-9


PANELS/PRESENTATIONS

CANDICE EDRINGTON

Presented at NCA. The presentation was Honoring PLACE: Digital Activism Through Communication and was sponsored by the Activism and Social Justice Division. National Communication Association was held in New Orleans, LA, November 17th-20th.

Abstract: From the Suffrage Movement to modern-day feminism, from Abolitionists to the Civil Rights, Black Lives Matter, and #MeToo movements, the role of communicators has been vital to activist work and social change for centuries. Today's movements rely upon the speed and connectivity of social media because through participatory media groups of people mobilize quickly, resulting in impactful action and messages that reverberate throughout the social sphere. This social connectivity and advocacy work resonates with Gen-Z learners. As social activism and engagement among youth continues to rise, within the classroom communication educators have an opportunity to teach tomorrow's communications practitioners to use their agency as creators and consumers to explore issues of identity, diversity, justice, and action through digital activism.

CANDICE EDRINGTON

Presented at NCA. The panel, Honoring PLACE Through the vMLK Project: Embodiment, Affect and Equity, was sponsored by the Visual Communication Division. National Communication Association was held in New Orleans, LA, November 17th-20th.

Abstract: This panel examines how equity is enacted and embodied -- and with what consequences -- through the Virtual Martin Luther King Project (vMLK), in relation to Kim Gallon's conceptualization of technologies of recovery as essential to Black Digital Humanities. Panelists will demonstrate and assess the project's immersive format and design: a transmedia project utilizing web tools, gaming and virtual reality platforms, and digitally rendered immersive audio recordings and visual models to engage the public in humanities content.

BOOK CHAPTER

AUGIE GRANT

This chapter provides a simple but detailed explanation of sampling procedures in communication research, with emphasis on changes in sampling techniques related to diffusion of digital technologies.

Citation: Grant, A. E. & Wilkinson, J. S. (2023). Sampling. In Zhou, S., Beasley, B., & Sloan, W. M. (Eds.) Research Methods in Communication (4th edition). Northport, AL: Vision Press.


CONFERENCE PAPER

VANESSA KITZIE, VALERIE LOOKINGBILL (iSchool PhD student), and MÓNICA COLÓN-AGUIRRE

Citation: Lookingbill, V., Kitzie, V., Winberry, J., Lund, B., Colón–Aguirre, M., & Hands, A. (2022, accepted). Expectations, rejections, and reviewer 2: Publishing demystified. Panel presented at ALISE Conference 2022, Pittsburgh, PA, October 24–26.

Abstract: Navigating the pressures and processes of academic publishing is a challenge for doctoral students and recent graduates. While there is a growing expectation that doctoral students and recent graduates are capable of immediately producing publishable research and survive in a “publish or perish” environment, many doctoral students have misperceptions of and remain uncertain about how to navigate the publishing process (Rich, 2013). However, while the quantity of publications does not necessarily equate to success in the job market, publishing productivity is critical in finding employment (Hatch & Skipper, 2016). As such, doctoral students need to consider the publishing process early in their program so they can present a competitive publishing record when entering the job market. Yet, many universities do not provide formal training on understanding scholarly publishing or devote efforts to include explicit content on navigating the publishing process (Hanafizadeh & Shaikh, 2021). This panel from ALISE’s Doctoral Student Special Interest Group will therefore address this gap by presenting advice and strategies for doctoral students at any stage of their program, focusing on expectations of publishing as a doctoral student and best practices for publishing research. Panelists, comprised of early-career faculty and doctoral candidates with admirable publication records, will discuss their experiences with publishing, specifically through discussions of (1) expectations for publishing productivity as a doctoral student; (2) their decision-making processes about where to submit research for publication; (3) their strategies for publishing most efficiently; and (4) their experiences with publication rejections. Panelists will provide insight into the typical workflows of the publishing process, detail the most common pitfalls when submitting research for publication, and describe how to effectively address these pitfalls in manuscripts to minimize chances of receiving rejections. Drawing on the experiences of the panelists, attendees will learn of best practices for submitting research for publication and understand how to address fundamental issues and pitfalls of publishing to help increase their chances of getting their work published.

VANESSA KITZIE, NICK VERA (iSchool PhD candidate), and JESSELYN DREESZEN BOWMAN (iSchool PhD student)

Citation: Kitzie, V., Wagner, T.L., Francis, D., Vera, A.N., & Dreeszen Bowman, J. (2022). Combatting health information injustices for community–based health promotion: A curricular outline. Paper presented at ALISE Conference 2022, Pittsburgh, PA, October 24–26.

Abstract: This paper addresses limitations of LIS education at the intersection of consumer health, community engagement, and amplifying marginalized voices. The authors propose a curricular outline for an MLIS course on community-based health promotion taught by community health workers (CHWs) who are LGBTQIA+. Queer theory and participatory learning inform this outline, serving as lenses for understanding health information injustices and leveraging community-based strengths to address them. The proposed curriculum utilizes existing research, training, and partnerships between the authors, CHW training specialists, and LGBTQIA+ CHWs. The latter received training using elements of the proposed curriculum and substantiated its offerings with their embodied knowledge and lived experiences. We plan on implementing this curricular outline in 2023.

VANESSA KITZIE and NICK VERA (iSchool PhD candidate)

Citation: Kitzie, V., Vera, A.N., & Wagner, T.L. (2022). Understanding the information creation practices of LGBTQIA+ community health workers. Paper presented at the 85th Annual Association for Information Science and Technology Conference 2022, Pittsburgh, PA, October 29 – November 1.

Abstract: This paper reports on preliminary findings from an action research project partnering health sciences librarians with community health workers (CHWs) who are LGBTQIA+ to create information resources for the CHW's community. Findings report on twelve virtual semistructured interviews with CHWs from South Carolina and eleven virtual brainstorming meetings between CHWs and health sciences librarians. The authors analyzed verbatim interview and meeting transcripts using a combination of deductive and inductive qualitative coding. Findings demonstrate 1) external barriers constrain and motivate information creation; 2) the presence of preexisting information, knowledge, and resources within the CHWs' communities; 3) that CHW-librarian pairs brainstormed how to codify and iterate what already exists; 4) that librarians adopted a reference role when brainstorming and suggested resource ideas within and outside of the CHWs' communities. Implications include strategies that researchers and practitioners can adopt to leverage existing experiential and embodied knowledge within LGBTQIA+ communities.

KIM THOMPSON and ANDREW WAKELEE (MLIS alumnus)

Juried conference paper for ALISE 2022 conference. Analyzes US library job ads for inclusivity of Spanish-speaking applicants.

Citation: Wakelee, A. A. & Thompson, K. M. (2022). Spanish-speakers preferred: How libraries can make their workforce better reflect their communities. Juried paper presented at the Association for Library and Information Science Education 2022 Conference: Go Back and Get It—From One Narrative to Many, 24-26 October, 2022, Pittsburgh, PA.

Abstract: While Spanish is the most spoken non-English language in the United States (US), Spanish-speakers face barriers to information access that may continue to impede their inclusion and careers in libraries. Despite a stated commitment to diversity, equity, and inclusion, the library profession continues to greatly underrepresent Spanish speakers in its collections and workforce. By looking at Social Identity Theory and the Theory of Information Poverty, we propose ways for libraries to better meet the needs of Spanish-speakers and to better include them in their workforce. This paper details an overview of the theoretical framework, provides a literature review on the Spanish-speaking community’s relationship to libraries, analyzes US job ads data for inclusive wording towards Spanish-speaking applicants, and provides practical steps that libraries can take to make their workforces and outreach programs more inclusive.


JOURNAL ARTICLES

YING YING CHEN, SEI-HILL KIM, JUNGMI JUN, JACOB LONG, ALI ZAIN (SJMC PhD student), COLIN PIACENTINE (SJMC PhD student)

Public Understanding of Science ranks 26/95 (Q2) in Social Science Citation Index-Communication by its Journal Impact Factor (IF=3.7 in 2021). This project was funded by CIC research grant in 2021.

Citation: Chen, Y., Long, J., Jun J., Kim, S., Zain, A., & Piacentine, C. (Accepted for publication). Anti-intellectualism Amid the COVID-19 Pandemic: The Discursive Elements and Sources of Anti-Fauci Tweets. Public Understanding of Science.

Abstract: Anti-intellectualism (resentment, hostility, and mistrust of experts) has become a growing concern that influences the public understanding of science during the pandemic. Using topic modeling and supervised machine learning, this study examines the elements and sources of anti-Fauci tweets as a case of anti-intellectual discourse on social media. Based on the theoretical framework of science-related populism, we identified three anti-intellectual discursive elements in anti-Fauci tweets: people-scientist antagonism, delegitimizing the motivation of scientists, and delegitimizing the knowledge of scientists. Delegitimizing the motivation of scientists appeared the most in anti-Fauci tweets. Politicians, conservative news media, and non-institutional actors (e.g., individuals and grassroots advocacy organizations) co-constructed the production and circulation of anti-intellectual discourses on Twitter. Anti-intellectual discourses still resurged under Twitter’s content moderation mechanism. We discuss theoretical and practical implications for building public trust in scientists, effective science communication, and content moderation policies on social media.

YING YING CHEN, SEI-HILL KIM, CHANG WON CHOI (SJMC PhD alumnus)

Communication Methods and Measures ranks 1/95 (Q1) in Social Science Citation Index-Communication by its Journal Impact Factor (IF=8.04 in 2021).

Citation: Chen, Y., Peng, Z., Kim, S., Choi, C. (Accepted for publication). What we can do and cannot do with topic modeling: A systematic review. Communication Methods and Measures.

Abstract: This systematic review examines 105 empirical studies that applied topic modeling as part of communication research. The review addresses three challenges (theory building and testing, research design, and the assessment of reliability and validity of topics) and seeks solutions from previous studies to advance the application of topic modeling. Regarding theory building and testing, we found that previous studies have mainly used topic modeling to explore the production of communication content on digital platforms. Moreover, we found integrating other analytical methods and merging ready-made or custom-made data will advance research design, helping future studies identify potential predictors and outcomes of the topics in communication messages. Lastly, we found inconsistencies in reporting reliability and validity, indicating that the procedures of topic modeling have not become fully standardized yet. Our review provides implications and strategies for future studies to maximize the strength of topic modeling.

JABRI EVANS

This article will be published in a special issue of the Journal of Global Hip-Hop Studies focused on the "Hip-Hop and the Internet." The volume is being edited by Dr. Steven Gamble. The female rap artists that I have spoken with over the last two years of field work have described to me a number of ways that Hip-Hop/racial stereotypes still map onto their interactions with their online audiences on social media. Essentially, while they are serving to empower their personal pathways to digital clout and financial success, they are also reproducing the status quo of hyper-sexualized representations of Black female bodies in mass media.

Citation: Evans, J.M. (2022), ‘Link in bio: Exploring the emotional and relational labour of Black women rappers in sexual dance economies on OnlyFans.’ Global Hip Hop Studies, 2:2, pp. 00–21, https://doi.org/10.1386/ghhs.

Abstract: Through interviews and participant observation, this article examines the emotional and relational labour of emerging female rap musicians and video models who have significant social media followings and create sexually explicit content for the subscription platform OnlyFans. Findings indicate that respondents felt conflicted in potentially exacerbating stereotypes about women in hip hop music, but also as sexual performers they felt empowered by taking ownership of racial stereotypes, their safety during interactions with men and how their bodies were commodified for pay. Ultimately, this study introduces insights on the digital evolution of hip hop culture’s relationship with sex work and reveals newfound ideological tensions faced by Black women rappers who are using sexual dance economies to adopt new direct-to-consumer business models on the internet (particularly on social media) to self-promote, sustain and develop their careers.

VANESSA KITZIE

Citation: Kitzie, V., Tsai, T., Martzoukou, K., Mabi, M.N., & Greyson, D. (in press). What is next for information world mapping? International and multidisciplinary approaches to understanding information behaviors/practices in context [Special issue, “Research Methods in Information Behavior Research”]. Library & Information Science Research, Eds. Y. Zhang, A.T. Chen, & M. Ocepek.

Abstract: As the use of arts-involved and data visualization methods increases in information science, it is essential to reflect on the strengths and weaknesses of various methods. An international lineup of information researchers shares their experiences using the participatory, visual elicitation technique Information World Mapping (IWM) in their work. The authors begin with an overview of IWM, detailing its origins and emerging directions. They summarize their application of IWM to describe information behaviors/practices across various locations, cultures, disciplines, and technology access environments. The authors conclude by discussing key questions and areas of exploration for IWM in information research, including cultural influences, changes in media and methods for data collection, power dynamics, and researcher positionality and reflexivity. Insights offer new possibilities for the next phase of IWM in information research, including challenges and areas for innovation.


PANELS/PRESENTATIONS

CLAYTON COPELAND and KIM THOMPSON

Citation: Charbonneau, D., Copeland, C.A., Dali, K., Mallary, K.J., Smith, A. & Thompson, K.M. (2022). Narratives of disability and accessibility. [Panel presentation]. Association for Library and Information Science Education 2022 Conference: Go Back and Get It: From One To Many, Pittsburgh, PA.

Abstract: The COVID-19 global pandemic has presented tremendous health-related challenges that affected workplace dynamics and social interactions. Although effects of the pandemic have been felt worldwide, some communities and individuals have been disproportionately impacted and overlooked in the pandemic response. This ALISE Disabilities SIG session will explore issues around topics related to disability, accessibility, and/or the intersection of both in various LIS educational and library contexts. The proposed session will consist of four interactive panel presentations offering perspectives relevant to the conference theme “From One Narrative to Many,” along with recommendations relevant to LIS educators and practitioners. The overall goal of this panel is to bring attention to the importance of shifting DEI discussions to a more inclusive, and welcoming Inclusion, Diversity, Equity, and Accessibility (IDEA) framework for everyone, with disability and accessibility as integral parts thereof. The panel session will consist of four panel presentations. Presentation topics include: 1) Examining disability definitions and models, 2) Strategies for incorporating universal design for learning (UDL) into online courses, 3) Experiences of disabled and neurodiverse PhD students in LIS during the COVID-19 pandemic, and 4) Defining barriers and identifying solutions for accessible, inclusive teaching and learning environments. At the end of the presentation, panelists will have an opportunity to interact with attendees to discuss the implications of the presentations for a range of various communities such as students, educators, library practitioners, and community members. To help facilitate an interactive discussion format, attendees and panelists will engage together in small group activities and conversations about practices for addressing some of the most pressing issues and concerns highlighted by the COVID-19 pandemic. In addition, attendees will be asked to reflect and comment on how the presented ideas may be applicable to their respective personal and professional environments and attendees will further be invited to share any additional recommendations.

CLAYTON COPELAND

Presentation for ALISE conference.

Citation: Copeland, C.A. & Mallary, K.J. (2022). Identifying barriers and solutions for accessible, inclusive teaching, learning, and practice. [presentation]. Association for Library and Information Science Education 2022 Conference: Go Back and Get It: From One To Many, Pittsburgh, PA. 

DARIN FREEBURG, MÓNICA COLÓN-AGUIRRE (iSchool faculty), KATIE KLEIN (iSchool PhD student), and EV PADILLA (iSchool BSIS student)

We presented at one of the general sessions at the recent South Carolina Library Association conference in Columbia. We talked about the role of libraries in supporting the knowledge and “knowing” needs of society post-COVID.

Citation: Freeburg, D., Colón-Aguirre, M., Klein, K., Padilla, E. (2022). How libraries are addressing America’s “knowing” challenges. South Carolina Library Association, Columbia, SC. [General Session Keynote].

KAREN GAVIGAN

Presented a session entitled, Never Forget: Graphic Novels about the Holocaust. Presented at the New England Library Association Conference in Manchester, New Hampshire on October 24th.

AUGIE GRANT

Conference presentation detailing specific contributions of women and people of color to the development and advancement of communication technologies. The history of communication technologies includes countless contributions by women and people of color, but these contributions have been underrecognized. The purpose of this panel was to spotlight these contributions, providing a more inclusive picture of the history of communication technologies.

Citation: Grant, A. E. (2023). Discovering diversity in media technology. Presented to BEA OnLocation, October 2022, Fort Collins, Colorado.

AUGIE GRANT

Conference presentation exploring the need for journalism faculty to reconceptualize objectivity and journalism as a whole to address the increasing challenges of misinformation and fake news. My presentation examined the history and faults related to teaching "both sides" approaches to journalism. Part of the reason that misinformation is rampant is the approach by some journalists to tell "both sides" of a story, even if there is only one side or more than two sides. Efforts to get the "other side" of a story often lead to amplification of misinformation.

Citation: Grant, A. E. (2023). Reconceptualizing objectivity. Presented to BEA OnLocation, October 2022, Fort Collins, Colorado.

KIM THOMPSON

Peer reviewer of Library and Information Science and other Social Science Fulbright applications based on qualifications and expertise in the field.

KIM THOMPSON

SIG Disability panel (reviewed) for ALISE 2022 conference. Introduces the World Health Organization International Classification of Functioning Disability and Health (WHO ICF) model for inclusive design of workplace structures.

Citation: Charbonneau, D., Copeland, C. A., Dali, K., Mallary, K. J., Smith, A. J. M., & Thompson, K. M. (2022, October 26). Narratives of disability and accessibility. Panel presentation for SIG Disability in LIS paper presented at the Association for Library and Information Science Education 2022 Conference: Go Back and Get It—From One Narrative to Many, 24-26 October, 2022, Pittsburgh, PA.

Abstract: The World Health Organization International Classification of Functioning Disability and Health (WHO ICF) model situates disability on the intersection of variations in function, on the one hand, and social constructs, on the other, tying it to limitations of activity and participation restrictions. Thompson and Dali make a critical assessment of this model, demonstrating how it can be used to justify intervening in workplaces and learning environments in order to make them more accessible to, equitable for, and inclusive of disabled people.


OTHER

KIM THOMPSON and YI WAN (iSchool PhD student)

Refereed poster for the ASIST Poster Session. Social identity may decide the information filtered by social groups, authorities, spaces, media, and algorithms reinforces individuals' social identity. The tendency may reinforce bias on pandemic information and put people at risk. The research may provide an implication to information platforms to reconsider their algorithm designs and a direction for information literacy training programs to break the deficit assumption on individuals.

Citation: Wan, Y. & Thompson, K. M. (2022, October 31). Making a cocoon: The social factors of pandemic misinformation evaluation. Poster presented at the Association for Information Science and Technology, Pittsburgh, PA, 29 October – 1 November 2022. https://asistdl.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/pra2.739

Abstract: This study explores the social factors that may impact individuals' evaluation process of pandemic-related misinformation through a socio-cognitive lens. We conducted eight semi-structured interviews to collect data from individuals. Content analysis was guided by framework analysis of the interview transcripts. The social factors revealed in the study are social identity, social groups, social authorities, social spaces, social media, and social algorithms. These factors work together and isolate individuals from heterogeneous information. Social identity may decide other factors; correspondingly, the information filtered by social groups, authorities, spaces, media, and algorithms reinforces individuals' social identity. The tendency may reinforce bias on pandemic information and put people at risk. The research may provide an implication to information platforms to reconsider their algorithm designs and a direction for information literacy training programs to break the deficit assumption on individuals.

Link: https://asistdl.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/pra2.739

JOURNAL ARTICLES

LEIGH MOSCOWITZ, NANDINI BHALLA (Ph.D. alumna), and JANE O’BOYLE (Ph.D. alumna)

Our article entitled "Selling Yoga ‘Off the Mat’: A 10-year Analysis of Lifestyle Advertorials in Yoga Journal Magazine" was just published in the Journal of Communication Inquiry.

Citation: Bhalla, N., O’Boyle, J., & Moscowitz, L. (2022). Selling Yoga ‘Off the Mat’: A 10-year Analysis of Lifestyle Advertorials in Yoga Journal Magazine. Journal of Communication Inquiry.

Abstract: Using framing theory, this study reports on a content analysis of advertorials across 10 years (2008–2017) of Yoga Journal magazine and found that products such as health supplements, herbal remedies and lifestyle brands like clothes and shoes were most often featured across the decade. The most common format was a regular feature, entitled “Off the Mat,” which promotes yoga lifestyle products identified by the magazine as “our partners.” This study also found that yoga-related products and female practitioners were the most common image categories displayed in advertorials. As the use and reach of advertorials increase, in the form of native ads in digital media, this study discusses the implications for the continued commodification of yoga and the role of advertorials in print magazines.

Link

YINGYING CHEN and CINDY YU CHEN (Ph.D. student)

Key implications from the study: First, news media is typically the major source of climate change information for the public and a critical determinant for successful climate change advocacy movements, but our findings reveal that the role of news media in climate change communication is more complicated. News media’s emphasis on political claims and the use of aggressive words did not work toward building public consensus on scientific facts. Particularly, overemphasizing political conflicts by partisan media could mislead the public and foment increasing polarization concerning climate change. Second, aggressive tweets from state actors are impactful in raising public attention to the climate change issue, but they also politicize the issue and could make public opinion more polarized. As social media platforms utilize the impact of state actors to bring more traffic, how the content moderation mechanisms moderate aggressive tweets from the state actors remains an open question for more attention.

Citation: Yuan, S., Chen, Y., Vojta, S., & Chen, C.Y. (2022) More aggressive, more retweets? Exploring the effects of aggressive climate change messages on Twitter. New Media & Society.

Abstract: Although an increasing amount of aggressive and polarized tweets about climate change are being observed, little is known about how they spread on Twitter. This study focuses on how different types of network gatekeepers use aggressive styles and how the styles affect their propagation. The current study employed a computational method and identified 951 influential accounts from 7.25 million tweets about climate change in 2019 and 2020. We analyzed their use of aggression and politicized cues, and the relationship with the volume of retweets. Results showed that even though aggressive tweets were a small portion of the overall tweets about climate change, aggressive tweets were more likely to be politicized and retweeted. Specifically, aggressive tweets from politicians received the most retweets and news media amplified the aggression.

Link

ROBERT MCKEEVER, BROOKE MCKEEVER, and GEAH PESSGROVE (Ph.D. alumna)

Citation: Pressgrove, G.N., McKeever, R., McKeever, B.W., & Waters. R.D. (Accepted for publication). Investigating membership retention: employing public relations theory to better understand relationship management. Journal of Nonprofit & Public Sector Marketing.

Abstract: Though nonprofit management literature frequently discusses the importance of communication and cultivating relationships with donors, members, and volunteers, research on how individuals process organizational messages is sparse. This study proposes a model theoretically based on communicative action problem solving that details a sequential chain of communicative actions that predict behavioral intentions to support organizations. Using an online survey of members of a state museum (n = 363), this study found support for how individuals process organizational messages. Specifically, individuals that perceive a strong relationship with an organization are more likely to seek out information from or about that organization. After seeking out information, individuals filter messaging to keep the most helpful content while ignoring other content before ultimately sharing those messages with their personal network. Through sequential mediation analysis, the data supports the hypothesized order of active communication processes and extends the conceptual linkages discussed by nonprofit management literature between organization-public relationships and behavioral outcomes.

LEIGH MOSCOWITZ

Our paper entitled “Well, He Is Paid to Be Violent…”: How Athlete Identity Alters Perceptions of Domestic Violence Incidents was recently published in the Howard Journal of Communications. An earlier version of this project was presented at the BEA conference this past April in Las Vegas.

Citation: Brown, K. A., Billings, A. C., Lewis, M., & Moscowitz, L. (2022). “Well, He Is Paid to Be Violent…”: How Athlete Identity Alters Perceptions of Domestic Violence Incidents. Howard Journal of Communications, 1-16.

Abstract: The purpose of this study is to determine if perceptions of violence related to race, gender and sport will impact audience reactions to domestic violence issues involving an athlete. Specifically, this study will examine how these elements of an athlete’s identity could affect his/her perceived image when faced with domestic violence accusations. A 3 (perceived race) X 2 (gender) X 2 (sport) factorial experiment was conducted using a national convenience sample of 626 participants from Qualtrics Panels. Results provided evidence that an athlete’s race and gender could have an impact on their perception during domestic violence cases, with the male athlete (regardless of the race of the athlete) and the White athlete (regardless of the gender of the athlete) facing more negative perceptions. Furthermore, the violent nature of the sport did not have an impact on the perceptions of the athlete. This study provides further evidence about the role that gender and race play in how domestic violence is perceived during criminal transgressions.

Link 

LINWAN WU

Examining the psychological process of developing consumer-brand relationships through strategic use of social media brand chatbots.

Citation: Lin, J-S., & Wu, L. (2022). Examining the psychological process of developing consumer-brand relationships through strategic use of social media brand chatbots. Computers in Human Behavior. DOI: 10.1016/j.chb.2022.107488

Abstract: As brands increasingly integrate artificial intelligence (AI)-enabled automation as part of their communication efforts, marketers have employed social media brand chatbots to provide personalized responses to consumers and facilitate relationship building. However, how specific facets of consumer–brand relationships may be manifested in the process of consumer–brand interaction via social media brand chatbots warrants further investigation. Hence, the current research develops a conceptual model to examine how perceived contingency, a defining psychological determinant of social media brand chatbots, determines consumer−brand relationship outcomes via different motivational experiences and consumer engagement. Based on the survey conducted in the U.S. (N = 491), the findings reveal that perceived contingency is positively related to gratifications of information seeking, social interaction, and entertainment, while information seeking and social interaction lead to enhanced consumer engagement. In addition, consumer engagement helps deepen brand intimacy, strengthen affective commitment, and increase chatbot-related behavioral intention and purchase intention. The findings further show that social-interaction gratification and consumer engagement are crucial components that underline how consumers’ perception of contingency can foster strong, affect-laden brand relationships when marketers capitalize on the conversational capabilities of social media brand chatbots. Theoretical and practical implications, as well as limitations and directions for future research, are discussed.

Link

PANELS/PRESENTATIONS

DENISE MCGILL

My photograph has been accepted into a juried photo exhibit "The Everyday Landscape: Contemporary Topographics." It features 24 photographers from across the country. The exhibit hangs at 918 Studios, 918 Lady Street, Columbia, SC. It runs Thursday, October 6, 2022 thru November 5, 2022. The Everyday Landscape presents contemporary radically different images from the common romanticized postcard photos. The nation-wide exhibit is sponsored by Photo Society of South Carolina.

Link

OTHER

LINWAN WU

Linwan was named to the Editorial Review Board of the Journal of Advertising Research.

CONFERENCE PAPER

YINGYING CHEN and ANLI XIAO

Citation: Chen, Y., Choung, H., Battocchio, A., Smith, M., Hiaeshutter-Rice, D., Draeger, M., Dong, C., & Xiao, A. (2022). Advancing discursive opportunity structure: The racial justice discourses by news and non-news local community organizations on Facebook. Paper presented at the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication Annual Conference, Detroit, USA.

Abstract: This study applies the Discursive Opportunity Structure (DOS) framework to examine local community organizations' racial justice discourses on Facebook. Using topic modeling, we analyzed 1.3 million Facebook posts from local community organizations in six Midwest cities during the 2020 BLM protests. Results from the times series analysis show racial justice discourses elicit user engagement on Facebook, which reversely promotes the production of racial justice discourses by local community organizations. Findings advance the theory of DOS.

ERIC ROBINSON

Citation: Robinson, E. (2022, Aug. 5). Actual Malice and the Irrational Speaker. 2022 Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication Annual Convention, Detroit.

Abstract: Several defamation cases stemming from apparently irrational statements are testing the boundaries and standards of defamation law. “Actual malice” is based on the speaker’s knowledge that a statement is false or their reckless disregard for whether it is true or not. An irrational speaker who believes their statement is true confounds this test. This paper delineates aspects of defamation law that are challenged by an irrational speaker and concludes with a recommendation for such cases.

YINGYING CHEN and CINDY YU CHEN (PhD student)

Citation: Chen, Y., Yuan, S., Vojta, S., & Chen, CY. (2022). Serial participants and the evolution of aggressive conversation networks about climate change on Twitter. Paper presented at the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication Annual Conference, Detroit, USA.

Abstract: This study examines serial participants who are consistently involved in aggressive conversations about climate change on Twitter. We identified 92 serial participants out of 1.1 million replies between 2019 and 2020. Using dynamic network modeling, we analyze the network structural characteristics and individual characteristics that predict the evolution of aggressive conversation networks. Our study advances the knowledge of how serial participants and their group dynamics may spark the diffusion of aggressive communications on climate change.


JOURNAL ARTICLES

CANDICE EDRINGTON

Citation: Edrington, C. L. (2022). Social Movements and Identification: An Examination of How Black Lives Matter and March for Our Lives Use Identification Strategies on Twitter to Build Relationships. Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly, 99(3), 643–659. https://doi.org/10.1177/10776990221106994

Abstract: This project presents a comprehensive understanding of how social movements use identification strategies across multiple digital platforms to build relationships with their publics. Drawing from a theoretical framework that blends dialogic communication, public relations, and rhetorical message strategies, and digital social advocacy, this study examines the Black Lives Matter and March For Our Lives movements. A Twitter content analysis found that Black Lives Matter and March for Our Lives use the sympathy identification strategy most frequently although this strategy did not generate the most engagement from their followers. This project concludes with implications in the areas of public relations and social movement studies.

Link: https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/10776990221106994

ERIC ROBINSON and DANIEL HAUN (PhD alumnus)

Citation: Haun, D.D. & Robinson, E.P. (2022), Do You Agree?: The Psychology and Legalities of Assent to Clickwrap Agreements, Richmond Journal of Law & Technology, 28:4, 623-656.

Abstract: When first accessing a website or online service, users are confronted with terms of service and privacy policies. These terms and policies are adhesion contracts which the user must accept to use the website or service. Virtually all users simply click “I agree” without reading the terms of these contracts. The law construes this as consent based on whether a “reasonable person” would understand that the click constitutes assent to those terms and policies. But studies show that various psychological factors such as obedience of authority can play a role in ill-informed acceptance of such contracts. This article argues that the law should take such psychological factors into account and suggests a framework for doing so.

Link: https://jolt.richmond.edu/files/2022/08/Haun-Robinson-Final-for-Publication.pdf


PANELS/PRESENTATIONS

CANDICE EDRINGTON

I participated in this month's Sydney Lectures panel. This panel featured some public relations giants (Coombs, Botan, Heath, Kruckeberg, Hallahan etc.) who discussed their foundational definitions of public relations and new(er) scholars (myself and others) who provided critical feedback of these definitions. Sydney Lectures is a lecture series out of Sydney, Australia hosted virtually by Dr. Michael L. Kent.

Link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FE3MF9jCFZM

CANDICE EDRINGTON

Designed to be given at the end of the semester, the one-minute campaign assignment is a culminating out-of-class assignment for graduate students in an introductory strategic communications course but could also be used in an advanced undergraduate public relations course. Understanding the strategic communication principles, students are expected to combine their knowledge and skill set to creatively and effectively deliver a key message to their audience based on their topic selection.

ERIC ROBINSON

Citation: Robinson, E. (panelist) (2022, Aug. 2). Clarence Brandenberg. In Christopher Terri (moderator), “Deplorable’s” Speech: The Radicals, Scoundrels and Rouges Behind Free Speech Precedents. Panel presented at 2022 Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication Annual Convention, Detroit.

Abstract: Presentation on Clarence Brandenberg, a KKK member whose prosecution led to the adoption of the "imminent lawless action" standard for restrictions on speech, at 2022 AEJMC annual convention.

ERIC ROBINSON

Citation: Robinson, E. (panelist) (2022, Aug. 2). Clarence Brandenberg. In Christopher Terry (moderator), “Deplorable’s” Speech: The Radicals, Scoundrels and Rouges Behind Free Speech Precedents. Panel presented at 2022 Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication Annual Convention, Detroit.

On a panel looking at speakers whose offensive speech led to major U.S. Supreme Court free speech rulings, I examined the life and motivations of KKK member Clarence Brandenburg, whose case established the "imminent lawless action" standard for government restrictions on speech.

JABARI EVANS

Citation: Evans, J.M. (2022). Exploring the Labor Practices of Hip-Hop's Female Community of Practice Within the Sexual Marketplace of OnlyFans. Paper presented at the Microsoft Race and Technology Researcher Summit and Workshop. Invited Collaborator and Panelist in affiliation with the Microsoft Research New England Social Media Collective. Cambridge, MA. August 3-5.

As a follow up to this year’s Microsoft Race & Tech Research Lecture Series, the Microsoft Race and Tech Research Workshop was designed to germinate and/or further develop research papers and projects addressing the critical intersection of race, caste, Indigeneity, technology and the future of work. The goals of the workshop were to:

  • Network with other scholars working in this space in order to enrich and develop collaborations on papers/projects that meaningfully address the intersections of race, technology, and the future of work
  • Identify gaps and priorities in this area to develop a broader research agenda at the intersection of race/tech/future of work

YINGYING CHEN

Citation: Chen, Y. (June 2022) Finding needles in a haystack? Advancing communication research with computational social science (CSS) approaches. Invited presentation at the Department of Information Management, Peking University. Online.

The invited presentation talks about the tools, strategies, and pitfalls of using computational social science research methods to make theoretical contributions to communication studies.


SPEAKING ENGAGEMENTS

CLAYTON COPELAND

Library Journal and School Library Journal (LJ &SLJ) Professional Development Series - Equity in Action: Solidarity in Social Justice

2nd session in the series

Aligning Accessibility and Inclusion Learn how to advocate for disability justice at your library in this session. You’ll learn how to align your physical spaces and accessibility level with your commitment to inclusion and solidarity, and ensure that accessibility is a priority, not an afterthought. (This may include details that are not as obvious, like scents, lighting, stimming, sensory overwhelm, and seating to accommodate a range of bodies.) You’ll learn about short- and long-term changes you can make to improve accessibility at your institution, and ensure equitable services and access to members of your community and coworkers who have disabilities, both visible and invisible.

Link: https://www.libraryjournal.com/event/equity-in-action-april-2022#program

JABARI EVANS

Citation: Evans, J.M. (2022). The Anatomy of Digital Clout(chasing): Examining Visibility, Relational Labor and Empowerment Strategies of Black Youth in Chicago’s Drill Rap Scene. Invited Speaker and Discussant at the Internet Researchers Roundtable at Craig Newmark Graduate School of Journalism at City University of New York Sponsored by Google. New York, NY. August 21-23.

This was an invitation-only meeting of researchers working to understand the Internet's impact on public discourse is being held at Craig Newmark Graduate School of Journalism at CUNY on Monday, Aug. 22 and the morning of Tuesday, Aug. 23. Discussions were be moderated by Dr. Siva Vaidhyanathan . The event was hosted by the Center for Media and Citizenship at the University of Virginia in addition to the Newmark Graduate School of Journalism.


OTHER

KEVIN HULL

Named to the Editorial Board of the Journal of Sports Media.

AWARDS/GRANTS

ALI ZAIN

Mass Communication and Society Travel Grant: To attend 105th annual Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication (AEJMC) Conference in Detroit, MI (1,000 USD) 

ALI ZAIN

First Place Moeller Student Paper Award: For presenting ”Moralization in Polarized Debate on COVID-19 Vaccination: Human-AI Collaborative Analysis of Tweets” at 105th annual Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication (AEJMC) conference (including 250 USD cash prize and waiver of conference registration fee worth 200 USD)


BOOK/BOOK CHAPTER

CANDICE EDRINGTON

Citation: Edrington, C. (2022). Can You Hear Me Now? How #ShareTheMicNow used Dialogue and Collaboration to Amplify the Voices of Black Women. In J. Katz Jameson & M. Hannah (Ed.), Volume I Contemporary Trends in Conflict and Communication: Technology and Social Media (pp. 91-108). Berlin, Boston: De Gruyter. https://doi.org/10.1515/9783110687262-007

Abstract: The first half of 2020 proved to be very busy as Americans were forced to tackle two pandemics: COVID-19 and racism. While COVID-19 began in other countries before making its way to the U.S., the racial injustices that were taking place in the United States sparked unprecedented protests around the globe. The stay-at-home orders established due to the COVID-19 pandemic forced citizens to not only take a break, but to take inventory of the harsh realizations lived by African Americans every day. Three deaths of unarmed Black people (Ahmaud Arbery, Breonna Taylor, and George Floyd) over the span of a few months prompted a resurgence of the Black Lives Matter movement both online and offline. Although the deaths of Arbery and Floyd received much attention from the media, Taylor’s death was not publicized nearly as much. The lack of media attention surrounding Taylor’s death, in comparison to both Arbery and Floyd, illuminated the intersectional invisibility of Black women and their voices. Created for the purpose of amplifying the voices of Black women, Bozoma Saint John initiated the #SharetheMicNow campaign. This campaign suggested that relationships between White women of power and Black women are a step in the right direction in the fight for social justice. The goal of this chapter is to highlight how White women of celebrity stature allowed Black women activists and celebrities to take over their Instagram accounts for a day to discuss their social justice efforts and to share how others could get involved. Using a case study approach, this chapter seeks to reveal how the #SharetheMicNow campaign used technology to promote dialogue and collaboration during a time of heightened awareness of racial injustice.

Link: https://doi.org/10.1515/9783110687262-007


CONFERENCE PAPER

ALI ZAIN and JACOB LONG (SJMC Faculty)

Citation: Zain, A. and Long, J. (2022, August). Countering online misinformation: testing impact of state sponsorship labels on message credibility, verification intention and behavior. 105th Annual Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication Conference, Detroit, MI.

Abstract: Exploring efficacy of state-sponsored media labels to counter misinformation on social media, this study found such labels had significant effect on behavioral tendency to visit verified information. However, the effect on message credibility and verification intention was statistically insignificant. Label’s effect also remained the same across mainstream social media platforms. Results showed that effect of label on accessing verified information did not mediate through message credibility and verification intention, indicating participants exclusively relied on heuristic cues to make a behavioral decision as suggested by the Heuristic Systematic Model.

ALI ZAIN

Citation: Zain, A. (2022, August). Spiral of silence 50 years later: conceptual and empirical new directions. 105th Annual Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication Conference, Detroit, MI.

Abstract: Building on 50-year research on spiral of silence, this study reviews extant literature to understand how the SOS has enabled researchers to explain public opinion in contemporary new media environment. The review suggests that digital media technologies not only provide opportunities to directly study SOS phenomena including selective exposure, fear of isolation, and anti-spiraling but also test key assumptions of this framework using sophisticated quantitative and computational methods. Potential future directions of research are discussed.

ALI ZAIN

Abstract: This study investigates moralization in polarized opinions about COVID-19 vaccines. It classified tweets into anti- and pro-vaccination and compared their moral foundations, topics, emotions, and sentiments, using human-AI collaborative analysis. Findings showed that anti- and pro-vaccination tweets were more likely to carry vice and virtue moral foundations, and specifically authority/subversion and loyalty/cheating, respectively. Topics, emotions, and sentiments also differed between anti- and pro-vaccination tweets. Findings signify use of moralization to understand debates surrounding healthcare issues.

FEILI TU-KEEFNER

CITATION: Tu-Keefner, F., Lyons, D. R., & Hobbs, A. (2022, July 26-29). Supporting library staff in Emergencies and natural disasters [Poster presentation]. To be presented at the 87th IFLA World Library and Information Congress, Dublin, Ireland.

Abstract: Society today expects libraries to be information service providers and serve as catalysts for community engagement. The mission of librarians is to improve society through facilitating knowledge creation, preservation, and dissemination. When the pandemic began, many libraries closed their doors, yet they took the opportunity to transform their services to various types of formats and continue the provision of essential information and innovative services to their user communities. This poster covers and shares examples of how librarians have stepped up to being leaders in the communities they serve, especially focusing on how librarians have gone far beyond to provide non-traditional library services to their communities, during the pandemic and beyond. It addresses the significance of creating diversified workforce in libraries, as well as how to integrate equity, diversity, and inclusion (EDI) in the libraries' strategic plans. The poster also highlights leadership qualifications in times of crisis, taken from the results of three situation-specific studies on the provision of disaster health-information services by public libraries. Additionally, tips for community engagement will be shared based on results from several information professionals from several different countries.

LUCILIA GREEN, JENNA SPIERING (iSchool Faculty), and JESSELYN BOWMAN DREESZAN (iSchool PhD Student)

Citation: Spiering, J., Bowman, J. D., & Green, L. (2022). A systematic review of K-12 LGBTQIA+ school and public library research. International Association of School Librarianship International Conference, Columbia, SC.

Abstract: To date, an exhaustive examination of LGBTQIA+ topics in international school and public library research has not been conducted. Studies on the topic tend to privilege North American library settings, and are frequently based on previous works published in English, often not considering the varied contexts and cultural issues at play in different countries. The IFLA School Library Guidelines clearly state “school libraries around the world, in their many forms, share a common purpose: the enhancement of teaching and learning for all;” a statement based on a core IFLA value, “the belief that people, communities, and organizations need universal and equitable access to information, ideas and works of imagination for their social, educational, cultural, democratic, and economic well-being” (Schultz-Jones and Oberg, 2015, p. 12). Such inclusivity in school library practice is bolstered by inclusivity in school and children's library research. The study significantly contributes to school and children's library practice by aggregating and presenting school and public library research on LGBTQIA+ students, communities, policies, and issues in an accessible and thematic manner. It further contribute to school and children's library research in two ways: a) by identifying gaps in school and public library research on LGBTQIA+ topics that need to be addressed, and b) by highlighting both problematic and successful approaches, settings, procedures and methodologies in the examination of LGBTQIA+ topics and populations.

LUCILIA GREEN

This session brings together a collection of presentations highlighting the ways libraries in different communities have harnessed the healing power of reading and literacy in partnership with music, art and other creative efforts, to enable community healing and well-being; reading for the heart, the mind and the soul.

Citation: Green, L. (July, 2022). Music + literacy for children at your library. IFLA World Library and Information Congress, Dublin, Ireland.

Link: https://iflawlic2022.abstractserver.com/program/#/details/sessions/134

SABRINA HABBIB

Paper presented at AEJMC Detroit, 2022.

Citation: Habib, S.; Vogel, T.; Villegas, J.: (2022) Mind the Gap: Are Societal and Technological Changes Reflected in the Advertising Curriculum? AEJMC National Convention, Detroit, MI.

SABRINA HABBIB

Paper presented at Creativity Conference, Southern Oregon University, Ashland, OR.

Citation: Thorne, E., Habib, S.; Vogel, T., (2022) Teaching Towards Creative Agency. Creativity Conference, Southern Oregon University, Ashland, OR.

Abstract: Developing students‚ creative agency is a delicate balance of providing enough creative constraints to scaffold learning while allowing students the freedom to determine their creative process and build creative confidence through trial and error. There are many challenges to prioritizing creative agency within an educational paradigm that was built for passive delivery of instruction including shifting student mindsets, balancing power dynamics, assessment of individualized learning, or limited resources and time needed for project-based learning.


JOURNAL ARTICLES

ALI ZAIN, JUNGMI JUN (SJMC Faculty), MARY ANN FITZPATRICK (SJMC Faculty), and NANLAN ZHANG (PhD Alumna)

Citation: Jun, J., Fitzpatrick, MA., Zain, A. and Zhang, N. (2022). Have e-cigarette risk perception and cessation intent of young adult users changed during the Pandemic? American Journal of Health Behaviors, 46 (3), 304-314(11). https://doi.org/10.5993/AJHB.46.3.9

Abstract: Objectives: Emerging evidence indicates that young adults who use e-cigarettes can withhold greater exposure to COVID-19 risk. We examine how young e-cigarette users perceive COVID-19 related threat of e-cigarette use and benefit of cessation as compared to traditional ones, applying the health belief model. We investigate changes of such perceptions during the pandemic and their associations with past attempt and future intent to quit e-cigarette use. Methods: We collected responses from US young adults (aged 18-25) who have used e-cigarettes in the past month by conducting 2 waves of online surveys in 2020 (wave 1, N=165) and 2021 (wave 2, N=347). Results: Young e-cigarette users in wave 2 reported greater estimates of COVID-19 and traditional threat as well as COVID-19 and traditional benefit of quitting than wave 1. However, we also found significant increases of e-cig dependence, perceived barriers of quitting, and the percentage of young e-cigarette users (33%) who had never attempted to quit in the past month. Importantly, a COVID-19 benefit of cessation and efficacy of quitting were significantly associated with cessation intent. Conclusions: Ongoing efforts are required to track post-pandemic e-cigarette risk perceptions and behaviors, as well as to identify strategies to mitigate increased dependence and usage of e-cigarettes.

Link: https://doi.org/10.5993/AJHB.46.3.9

AMIR KARAMI, SPRING B. CLARK (iSchool alumna), ANDERSON MACKENZIE (iSchool Alumna), DORATHEA LEE (Honors College), MICHAEL ZHU (Honors College), HANNAH R. BOYAJIEFF (Honors College), and BAILEY GOLDSCHMIDT (Honors College)

Citation: Karami, A., Clark, S. B., Mackenzie, A., Lee, D., Zhu, M., Boyajieff, H. R., & Goldschmidt, B. (2022). 2020 US presidential election in swing states: Gender differences in Twitter conversations. International Journal of Information Management Data Insights, 2(2), 100097.

Abstract: Social media is commonly used by the public during election campaigns to express their opinions regarding different issues. Among various social media channels, Twitter provides an efficient platform for researchers and politicians to explore public opinion regarding a wide range of topics such as the economy and foreign policy. Current literature mainly focuses on analyzing the content of tweets without considering the gender of users. This research collects and analyzes a large number of tweets and uses computational, human coding, and statistical analyses to identify topics in more than 300,000 tweets posted during the 2020 U.S. presidential election and to compare female and male users regarding the average weight of the discussed topics. Our findings are based upon a wide range of topics, such as tax, climate change, and the COVID-19 pandemic. Out of the topics, there exists a significant difference between female and male users for more than 70% of topics.

Link: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2667096822000404

JABARI EVANS

Citation: Evans, J. M. (2022). Exploring Social Media Contexts for Cultivating Connected Learning with Black Youth in Urban Communities: the case of Dreamer Studio. Qualitative Sociology, DOI: 10.1007/s11133-022-09514-6.

Abstract: Using the Connected Learning framework as a conceptual lens, this study utilizes digital ethnographic methods to explore outcomes of a Hip-Hop Based Education program developed to provide music related career pathways for Chicago youth. Using the narratives of the participants within the program, I draw on participant observation online and in-depth interviews collected to explore the link between the tenets of Connected Learning and digital participation in this artistic community of practice. I explore participants’ work within social media platforms toward building their creative skill, cultivating a public voice, connecting to mentors and communication that strengthens the social bonds within their peer community. This study’s findings affirm prior studies that suggest late adolescence is an important time frame where children are developing social identities online in affinity spaces, but in ways that are tied to civic engagement, self-empowerment and critical skill development for their future pathways. To conclude, I suggest that investigating participant activity on social media platforms as a part of field work can help ethnographers to better connect their impact to the agency and life trajectories of their youth participants.

JUNGMI JUN, MARY ANNE FITZPATRICK (SJMC Faculty), ALI ZAIN (Ph.D. Student), and NANLAN ZHANG (SJMC Ph.D. alumna)

Citation: Jun, J., Fitzpatrick M. A., Zain, A. & Zhang, N. (2022). Have e-cigarette risk perception and cessation intent of young adult users changed during the pandemic? American Journal of Health Behaviors. 46(3), 303-313. DOI: 10.5993/AJHB.46.3.9.

Abstract: Objectives: Emerging evidence indicates that young adults who use e-cigarettes can withhold greater exposure to COVID-19 risk. We examine how young e-cigarette users perceive COVID-19 related threat of e-cigarette use and benefit of cessation as compared to traditional ones, applying the health belief model. We investigate changes of such perceptions during the pandemic and their associations with past attempt and future intent to quit e-cigarette use. Methods: We collected responses from US young adults (aged 18-25) who have used e-cigarettes in the past month by conducting 2 waves of online surveys in 2020 (wave 1, N=165) and 2021 (wave 2, N=347). Results: Young e-cigarette users in wave 2 reported greater estimates of COVID-19 and traditional threat as well as COVID-19 and traditional benefit of quitting than wave 1. However, we also found significant increases of e-cig dependence, perceived barriers of quitting, and the percentage of young e-cigarette users (33%) who had never attempted to quit in the past month. Importantly, a COVID-19 benefit of cessation and efficacy of quitting were significantly associated with cessation intent. Conclusions: Ongoing efforts are required to track post-pandemic e-cigarette risk perceptions and behaviors, as well as to identify strategies to mitigate increased dependence and usage of e-cigarettes.

Link: https://doi.org/10.5993/AJHB.46.3.9

LAURA SMITH, ERIC ROBINSON, and CARMEN MAYE

Citation: Smith, L.K., Robinson, E. & Maye, C. (2022). Improving Assessment Results: Experimenting With Data Collection Methods in a Law & Ethics Course. Journal of Media Education (publication pending, July edition).

Abstract: This three-year project sought to determine what method is best for collecting posttest data and better measure what students are actually learning in a given course. It explores learning outcomes within a Law & Ethics course in the School of Journalism and Mass Communications at the University of South Carolina in Columbia. Students demonstrate knowledge on key concepts in one of two conditions: (1) an optional, semester-ending quiz that students take to help them prepare for the class final, or (2) on questions embedded within a final exam. Findings show students perform significantly better in the second condition, suggesting that students score higher when more “weight” is attached to their ultimate performance. Findings were duplicated in years two and three of the project, providing a path to more reliable and valid assessment data in the SJMC.

Link: https://en.calameo.com/journal-of-media-education/read/000091789683f3a469a55

LUCILIA GREEN and DR. KAREN CHASSEREAU (Candler County Schools)

Citation: Green, L., & Chassereau, K. (in press). Modeling guided inquiry and school librarian instructional partnerships to pre-service teachers through digital video production. Journal of Education for Library & Information Science. Advanced Access.

Abstract: The last ten years in school library research reflect an expanded definition of information literacy along with a stronger emphasis on in-depth information literacy development, concluding that a fundamental shift in instruction provided by school librarians is needed; one that not only helps students find information, but develops students’ abilities to interact with, and learn from information, engaging with it in critical ways. Collaboratively designed and implemented through an instructional partnership between the school librarian and a classroom teacher, Guided Inquiry instruction helps students gain meaningful understanding and develop a personal perspective by exploring, comparing, and contrasting multiple information sources. Despite the frequently touted benefits of instructional partnerships between school librarians and classroom teachers, these structures are rarely, if ever, modeled by school library and pre-service teacher educators. This study examined the process and challenges inherit in designing and modeling Guided Inquiry units of instruction, through a school librarian instructional partnership model, in pre-service teacher education, exploring its impact on teacher candidate willingness to identify school librarians as co-teachers. Findings from the present study indicate Guided Inquiry units co-taught by school library educators and teacher educators help teacher candidates both successfully navigate the research process and develop a mental model of the school librarian as a co-teacher.

ROBERT MCKEEVER, FRANKWADDELL (Journalism faculty, University of Florida), and HOLLY OVERTON (former SJMC faculty)

Citation: Waddell, T.F., Overton, H., & McKeever, R. (in press). Does Sample Source Matter for Theory? Testing Model Invariance with the Influence of Presumed Influence Model across Amazon Mechanical Turk and Qualtrics Panels. Computers in Human Behavior

Abstract: Online data collection services are increasingly common for testing mass communication theory. However, how consistent are the theoretical tenets of theory when tested across different online data services? A pre-registered online survey (N = 1,546) examined the influence of the presumed influence model across subjects simultaneously recruited from Amazon Mechanical Turk and Qualtrics Panels. Results revealed that model parameters were mostly consistent with the IPI theory regardless of data source. Methodological implications are discussed.

PANELS/PRESENTATIONS

FEILI TU-KEEFNER and ABBY BRICKER (iSchool Grad Student)

Citation: Tu-Keefner, F., Hobbs, A., & Bricker, A. (2022, July 26-29). Fighting an infodemic through accurate, intelligible COVID-19 Information: An analysis of the readability level of authoritative online consumer health information. To be presented at the 87th IFLA World Library and Information Congress, Dublin, Ireland.

Abstract: Since the beginning of 2020, the COVID-19 virus and its variants have affected lives worldwide and have advanced a mistrust of science. The World Health Organization points out that global health professionals, public health professionals, and information professionals have fought not only against this rapidly evolving virus but against an infodemic as well. Because uncertainty, fear, conspiracy theories, and distrust are associated with the current COVID-19 pandemic, the public needs access to accurate information and clear, specific instructions to help them act appropriately. Therefore, source credibility is key to successful risk communication.

During this public health crisis, people must be able to identify and access specific and comprehensible information in order to protect themselves and their families. Individuals need information that is easy to understand, makes sense based on their knowledge, is convenient to access, and is easy to use. Also, it must be accurate and come from authoritative sources to aid in behavior changes and health decision-making. Public health experts suggest that a critical component of source credibility is the use of multiple channels, including Internet portals, to disseminate reliable information to those who need it. Therefore, the Internet is a major source for publishing, disseminating, and accessing massive lay- and professional-oriented COVID-19 information because of its 24/7 availability and easy access.

This study examines the Flesch-Kincaid grade levels of the COVID-19 consumer health information in English published by credible sources (for example, public health agencies) shared on the websites of the public library systems of the twenty largest cities in the U.S. It investigates whether the information provided by these authoritative organizations can support the evidence-based health information access activities of adults from the general public in the U.S. This content analytical study examines the reading level of the resources to see if they are compatible with the guidelines of the American Medical Association for patient education materials (i.e., at a sixth-grade level). The results show that the documents reviewed in the study are not compatible with this reading level. Information provided by authoritative sources must be made easy to understand and access, or it cannot support the fight against the current infodemic. Communication professionals, public health professionals, and information professionals must monitor online COVID-19 consumer health information to assess whether the general public can easily access it and use it for evidence-based problem-solving. Health information specialists must promote the concept of accessing credible information published by authoritative sources by partnering with public librarians to deliver health information literacy-related courses to their users.

KAREN GAVIGAN

Presented a session at the International Association of School Librarian's Conference: The session was entitled Never Forget: Using Graphic Novels to Teach Students about the Holocaust

 SHANNON BOWEN

Citation: Governmental Use of Social Media and AI during Disasters, Crises, and Emergency Response, paper presented at BledCom, Slovenia, July 2, 2022

Abstract: Introduction and Purpose. This paper explores the conference theme of whether social media could use a reboot in communicating with stakeholders during disasters, crises, or emergencies. To some extent, this “re-boot” is not optional: it is happening due to rapid changes in technology such as AI and machine learning, and due to social changes and pressures from the sustained crisis of the global Covid-19 pandemic. Literature Review: This study examines the literature of issues management in crises, emergency, and disaster management, as well as government and public affairs, ethics of governmental relations, and applications of artificial intelligence in communication and social media use. RQ: This paper asks, to what extent are public affairs officers (PAOs) - or Public Information Officers (PIOs) - using social media, advanced computational methods, and Artificial Intelligence (AI) to help manage crises, emergencies, and disasters? Method: Data collection and analyses is still ongoing: Two focus groups and 8 in-depth interviews with 40 PAOs working in governmental agencies were conducted to understand how social media is used during a crisis, the extent to which misinformation interferes with accurate information, and the potential for AI application in optimizing efficiencies during a crisis or natural disaster. Limitations and Suggestions for Future Research. Hurricane response was used as an example in a coastal southeastern state in the USA. This research is illustrative of response in that state but due to variances in states and governing structures, and across nationalities, the conclusions should not be applied to other areas without further study. Future studies could compare and contrast other states, public sector organizations, and nationalities in use of social media and AI in emergencies. Results and Conclusions: Officials detailed the extent to which they used different social media platforms during such an emergency, how media relations takes place, how misinformation is handled (from honest mistakes to maleficent bad actors), and how citizen-stakeholders are communicated with via social media during crises. Participants want an AI that can show sentiment analysis, monitor news sources, measure the reach of their own messages disseminated via social media, and find problematic or incorrect information. Currently, research, data analytics, and AI are little-used in governmental public affairs, especially during crises. This finding shows a need for formative and evaluative research, as well as a potential for marked improvement in efficiencies via AI applications. Practical and social implications. PAOs/PIOs could have a revolutionized ability to identify information reach, flows, provenance, and authenticity as well as to address misinformation on social media via the use of AI. As a computer science team develops the AI supporting this research, the use of AI and machine learning will be tested which can speed the efficiency and accuracy of responses to hurricanes and other crises/disasters. Emergency management could be improved in numerous ways and used in many locales.

SHANNON BOWEN

Presented "Co:Cast Crisis Observatory" as the Human-Centered Design Lead, National Science Foundation Expo, Washington DC

VANESSA KITZIE, JESSELYN DREESZEN BOWMAN (iSchool PhD Student), and KATHIA VALVERDE (Arnold School, Center for Community Health Alignment)

Citation: Kitzie, V., Valverde, K., & Dreeszen Bowman, J. (2022). Developing an LGBTQIA+ specialization for Community Health Worker (CHW) training. Poster to be presented at the National LGBTQ+ Health Conference, Chicago, IL, July 28-30.

Abstract: LGBTQ+ populations experience significant barriers to obtaining affirming healthcare. One key barrier is informational, as LGBTQ+ persons find it challenging to learn about their health needs, know what medical professionals to trust, and navigate healthcare systems. These difficulties are the byproducts of LGBTQ+ people left out of formal knowledge production centered on their health issues and needs. This project addresses these inequities by training and certifying LGBTQ+ people as Community Health Workers (CHWs).

CHWs act as critical intermediaries between healthcare systems and their communities, often underserved and experiencing health challenges. CHWs promote community health via outreach, community education, informal counseling, social support, and advocacy. CHW training allows participants to develop the necessary skills to implement these interventions and community action for health promotion. Training functions as an important way to bring LGBTQ+ people to the forefront of conversations in formal spaces like healthcare systems.

Per these acknowledged needs and benefits of CHW training, the project team recruited a cohort of 11 LGBTQ+ community leaders from across South Carolina (SC). SC LGBTQ+ residents experience more severe health challenges than national averages. The cohort received foundational CHW training to enhance core competencies relevant to the emerging CHW profession. The training was facilitated in a participatory learning format focused on sharing the lived experience of training participants and included 161 hours of learning content. Participatory learning allows long-term information retention and application while developing skills in the field instead of short-term retention of theoretical information that may go unapplied.

After completing foundational training, this same cohort participated in a 30-hour pilot specialization training for CHWs working with LGBTQ+ people. The training explored unique approaches that could serve LGBTQ+ people while considering the cultural humility necessary to navigate intersectional identities outside the LGBTQ+ umbrella. In addition, the cohort built upon and shared their lived experiences to substantiate the curriculum for future cohorts who may have less knowledge on the given topic.

Qualitative evaluation results from the cohort indicated that the combination of foundational and specialty track training allowed them to (a) critically think about their experiences, (b) contribute to training for future peers and allies, and (c) develop skills to apply in their respective communities in the following ways: Using training materials when engaging with health professionals. Developing a community resource guide to support community members. Engaging in advocacy work for trans-inclusive birthing centers in SC. Developing sustained networking opportunities. Further, CHWs at large have expressed interest in taking future iterations of the training to more effectively and inclusively conduct community health work. Significant lessons learned include: Providing a platform to intentionally foster sustained community connections. Providing a neutral party for CHWs to communicate concerns. Emphasizing the need for LGBTQIA+ CHWs because of the context they provide based on lived experience and specialized training.

While many lessons were learned, the CHW field, especially as it relates to serving LGBTQ+ populations, still holds unexplored avenues. The information collected from this experience can serve as a solid foundation for those that wish to build upon them. 


SPEAKING ENGAGEMENTS

SHANNON BOWEN

Integration of several recent papers and 1 ongoing project to determine ethics of strategically managing issues with/for stakeholders during difficult times (such as the pandemic, natural disasters, DEI, terrorism, war, and social unrest).

Citation: Strategy under uncertainty: How U.S. organizations respond to socio-political challenges, new ethical and political research perspectives. Keynote presented at BledCom, Slovenia, July 2, 2022

OTHER

ALI ZAIN

Accepted to CHQ Junior Scholar Program (2022-23), an extensive research traineeship offered by the SC SmartState Center for Health Quality to apply computational methods for research at the interaction of public health and social media ($3,000 worth research support + up to $1,500 travel grant)

FEILI TU-KEEFNER

I will moderate one of the discussion topics for the IFLA Evidence for Global Disaster Health (E4GDH) SIG Open Session: Librarians as Evidence Intermediaries During Times of Crisis.

LUCILIA GREEN

Dr. Lucy Santos Green was voted President-Elect of The Association for Library and Information Science Education (ALISE). ALISE is the global leader in education for the information profession, promoting innovative, high-quality education for the information professions internationally through engagement, advocacy and research. ALISE is a non-profit organization that serves as the intellectual home of faculty, staff, and students in library and information science, and allied disciplines.

Link: https://ali.memberclicks.net/alise-election-2022-santos-green

AWARDS/GRANTS

JABARI EVANS

I was recently awarded an Innovative Pedagogy Grant from the Center for Teaching Excellence for my newly designed course, Jour 309: Hip-Hop, Media and Society.

Instead of solely relying on a textbook, I am utilizing a producing podcast episodes that will serve similar to required readings. This not only will allow the course to cater to different modes of learning but also will exclusive access to gatekeepers in the Hip Hop music industry.


BOOK/BOOK CHAPTER

 VANESSA KITZIE and JENNA SPIERING

Citation: Santos Green, L., Spiering, J., Kitzie, V., & Erlanger, J. (2022). LGBTQIA+ inclusive children’s librarianship: Queer-positive policies, programs, and practices. (approx. 75,000-word book). Santa Barbara, CA: ABC-CLIO.

Abstract: This book breaks new ground, offering school and public librarians serving children in grades K–8 a roadmap for implementing and upholding queer-inclusive programs, policies, and services. School and public librarians are serving ever greater numbers of LGBTQIA+ children and families. Transgender children may begin to express a strong sense of gender identity as early as 2–3 years of age. Children are also identifying as gay much sooner than earlier generations—often between the ages of 7 and 12. Additionally, more children than ever before are living with LGBTQIA+ caregivers. In seeking to make our programs and services inclusive and equitable for these growing populations, librarians may court controversy and face community backlash from patrons who feel queer-inclusive content is inappropriate for young children. This book codifies a set of best practices for librarians as they rise to this challenge, defining queer-inclusive programs, identifying potential barriers to implementation, and offering strategies and resources to overcome them.

Link: https://www.abc-clio.com/products/a6348p/

BOOK REVIEW

 ERIC ROBINSON

A review of Eric Robinson's Cyber Law and Ethics: Regulation of the Connected World, co-written with Mark Grabowski of Adelphi University, said that the internet law textbook "helps nonlawyers understand the general issues" and is a "noteworthy addition[] for any journalism and media communication professor seeking fresh ideas and instructional paths."

Citation: Lipschultz, J. H. (2022). Noteworthy Books. Journalism & Mass Communication Educator. https://doi.org/10.1177/10776958221097242

Link: https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/10776958221097242


CONFERENCE PAPER

CARL CICCARELLI (SJMC PhD student), BROOKE MCKEEVER (SJMC Faculty), and ROBERT MCKEEVER (SJMC Faculty)

Conference paper accepted to AEJMC: Empathy and the Health Belief Model in the Context of COVID-19

Citation: Ciccarelli, C., McKeever B., & McKeever, R. (2022, August). Empathy and the Health Belief Model in the Context of COVID-19. Paper to be presented at the Annual Conference of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication. Detroit, MI.


JOURNAL ARTICLES

BROOKE MCKEEVER and other faculty/grad students from the Arnold School of Public Health

Citation: Zhang, R., Qiao, S., McKeever, B. W., Olatosi, B., & Li, X. (2022). Listening to Voices from African American Communities in the Southern States about COVID-19 Vaccine Information and Communication: A Qualitative Study. Vaccines, 10(7), 1046. https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines10071046

Abstract: The high uptake of COVID-19 vaccines is one of the most promising measures to control the pandemic. However, some African American (AA) communities exhibit vaccination hesitancy due to mis- or disinformation. It is important to understand the challenges in accessing reliable COVID-19 vaccine information and to develop feasible health communication interventions based on voices from AA communities. We conducted 2 focus group discussions (FGDs) among 18 community stakeholders recruited from 3 counties iSouth Carolina on 8 October and 29 October 2021. The FGDs were conducted online via Zoom meetings. The FGD data were managed and thematically analyzed using NVivo 12. Participants worked primarily in colleges, churches, and health agencies. We found that the challenges of accessing reliable vaccine information in AA communities primarily included structural barriers, information barriers, and a lack of trust. Community stake- holders recommended recruiting trusted messengers, using social events to reach target populations, and conducting health communication campaigns through open dialogue among stakeholders. Health communication interventions directed at COVID-19 vaccine uptake should be grounded in ongoing community engagement, trust-building activities, and transparent communication about vaccine development. Tailoring health communication interventions to different groups may help reduce misinformation spread and thus promote vaccination in AA communities in the southern states.

Link: https://mdpi-res.com/d_attachment/vaccines/vaccines-10-01046/article_deploy/vaccines-10-01046.pdf?version=1656519941

VANESSA KITZIE

Citation: Kitzie, V., Floegel, D., Barriage, S., & Oltmann, S.M. (2022). How visibility, hypervisibility, and invisibility shape library staff and drag performer perceptions of and experiences with drag storytimes in public libraries. The Library Quarterly: Information, Communication, Policy, 92(3), 215-240.

Abstract: This article uses data from interviews with public library staff and drag performers to understand how discourses surrounding queer visibility, hypervisibility, and invisibility affect library staff members’ and performers’ perceptions of drag storytimes. Informed by interviews with library staff and drag performers, we argue that hypervisibility and invisibility narratives mark drag storytimes as dangerous and trendy and may unduly influence how some library staff members view these events. Conversely, other staff members and drag performers engage in significant tactical emotional and physical labor to recognize these events as inherently queer and powerful critical literacy programs. Understanding how varying degrees of visibility mediate library staff and performer perceptions of and experiences with drag storytimes lends insights into larger narratives centered on queerness and belonging within libraries. Drag performers’ narrative accounts also offer paths by which library staff may work with performers to promote authentic queer visibility.

Link: https://www.journals.uchicago.edu/doi/10.1086/719915

VANESSA KITZIE

Citation: Oltmann, S. M., Kitzie, V., & Barriage, S. (2022). “For me, it is an intellectual freedom issue”: Drag storytimes, neutrality, and ALA core values. Journal of Librarianship and Information Science. Advance online publication. https://doi.org/10.1177/09610006221100853

Abstract: Drag storytimes are increasingly popular programing events in which drag performers lead storytime in public libraries or other settings; they have been both popular and contentious. In this study, we utilized data from a national survey of 458 library staff and 26 subsequent interviews to investigate connections between drag storytime, intellectual freedom, neutrality, and other core librarianship values. The data was analyzed inductively and several key themes emerged: hosting drag storytimes is an intellectual freedom stance; various perspectives on the American Library Association stance in support of drag storytimes; connections to other core values; emphasizing diversity to serve one’s community; and contesting the neutrality of libraries. We found difficult-to-reconcile stances of “presenting all sides” and “taking a side,” but we suggest a way forward by focusing on the outcome of collective self-governance (based on core values of intellectual freedom and democracy).

PANEL/PRESENTATION

FEILI TU-KEEFNER and ABBY BRICKER (MLIS student)

This is a conference presentation at the Medical library Association's 2022 annual convention. This is a hybrid conference held in both online and onsite formats.

Citation: Tu-Keefner, F., Hobbs, A., & Bricker, A. (2022, May 2-7). Do your general public users understand the COVID-19 health information you have provided? A content analytical study. To be presented at Medical Library Association Annual Meeting & Exhibition, New Orleans, LA.

Abstract: Objectives Because uncertainty, great fear, conspiracy theories, and distrust are associated with the current COVID-19 pandemic, people need access to accurate and easy-to-understand information to help them act appropriately. Major health organizations in the U.S., such as the NLM and the Mayo Clinic, have created web portals to rapidly release authoritative COVID-19 health information to a large population. These resources published via MedlinePlus and Mayo Clinic have been widely promoted for user access in public libraries. It is essential to examine whether these authoritative COVID-19 health information resources facilitate health information access by adults from the general public. Methods This study examines the levels of readability and comprehension of the COVID-19 health information distributed via MedlinePlus and by the Mayo Clinic. The research design for this study is based on Savolainen's everyday life information concepts and Dervin's sense-making methodology. The research purposes are to 1) better understand the connections between readability levels and consumer health information comprehension; 2) investigate whether the authoritative COVID-19 health information provided can support the evidence-based health information access activities of adults from the general public. The sample populations analyzed are identified through accessing the COVID-19 health information shared on the public library systems' websites of the twenty largest cities in the United States. Microsoft Office software is utilized for content analysis and to calculate the averages of the readability scores of the COVID-19 health information provided by the targeted organizations. Results The study examines the reading level of the resources to see if they are compatible with the guidelines of the American Medical Association (AMA) for patient education materials (i.e., at a sixth-grade level). The results show that the documents reviewed in the study are not compatible with this reading level. Information provided via MedlinePlus and the Mayo Clinic must be made easy to understand and access. Conclusions This study shows the readability levels of the commonly used authoritative COVID-19 consumer health information distributed via MedlinePlus and by the Mayo Clinic) are higher than the AMA recommendations for patient education materials. Most of the public libraries and public librarians are not aware of the use of MedlinePlus for user services; education programs must be provided to public librarians and the general public to promote the awareness of MedlinePlus and MedlinePlus Español. Publishers, such as the National Library of Medicine, must strive to lower the readability levels of their COVID-19 consumer health information. Health information professionals need to actively join the force to monitor the readability levels and to produce consumer health information in low grade-level readability on COVID-19, as well as fight against the COVID-19 pandemic and infodemic. Health information professionals need to actively join the force to monitor the readability levels and to produce consumer health information in low grade-level readability on COVID-19, as well as fight against the COVID-19 pandemic and infodemic.


TRAINING PROGRAM

FEILI TU-KEEFNER

I am currently one of the coaches for the "Comprehensive Training for Promotion of Vaccine Demand" posted by GAVI, WHO, UNICEF & US CDC .

Abstract: This program is designed to promote the knowledge and skills to maintain and restore routine immunization and promote COVID-19 vaccination by leveraging social data, behavioral insights, infodemic management, service experience and digital strategies.


TOP DOWNLOADED ARTICLE

AMIR KARAMI and MACKENZIE ANDERSON (iSchool Alumna)

Social media and COVID‐19: Characterizing anti‐quarantine comments on Twitter is among the top 10 most downloaded Wiley papers.

Link: https://asistdl.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/epdf/10.1002/pra2.349

AWARDS/GRANTS

JUNGMI JUN, HOMAYOUN VALAFAR (College of Engineering and Computer Science), JIM THRASHER (Arnold School of Public Health), and FOREST AGOSTINELLI (College of Engineering and Computer Science)

The team received ASPIRE II grant ($99,190) for "Automatic and personalized identification of smoking using smartwatches" from the Office of the Vice President for Research.


BOOK/BOOK CHAPTER

JUNGMI JUN and NANLAN ZHANG (Ph.D. alumna)

Citation: Jun, J. & Zhang, N. (2022). Fight the virus, fight the bias: Asian Americans’ COVID-19 racism experience, health impact, and activism. In S. Navarro and S. Hernandez (Eds). The Color of COVID-19: The Racial Inequality of Marginalized Communities. DOI: 10.4324/9781003268710-8

Link: https://books.google.com/books?id=cx1tEAAAQBAJ&newbks=0&printsec=frontcover&pg=PT110&dq=10.4324/9781003268710-8&hl=en&source=newbks_fb#v=onepage&q=10.4324%2F9781003268710-8&f=false 


CONFERENCE PAPERS

TARA MORTENSEN, TAYLOR WEN (SJMC Faculty), COLIN PIACENTINE (SJMC PhD Student), BRIAN MCDERMOTT (University of Massachusetts Amherst Faculty), and NORA BOST (SJMCS Honor Student Alumnus)

Conference paper accepted to AEJMC: An eye-tracking analysis of negative and positive emotional staff and stock photos in the news

Citation: Mortensen, T., Wen, T., Piacentine, C., McDermott, B., Bost, N. (2022, August). An eye-tracking analysis of negative and positive emotional staff and stock photos in the news

Abstract: Scholars have criticized that visual elites merely assume the effects of emotional photojournalistic images, with most of this literature being within the realm of psychology. In the present study, a 2 (stock photo and staff photo) by 2 (positive valence and negative valence) study is conducted to examine audience reactions to emotional images in a news context. Within photojournalism research, audience reactions toward neither of the twin photojournalistic values of emotion and credibility have been well studied. Viewer perceptions are measured through: self-reported arousal levels using three 9-point items on a bipolar scale, credibility perceptions using the previously-developed News Photo Credibility Scale, and visual attention using the eye-tracking measures of fixation duration and fixation count. [Paper presentation]. Paper to be presented at the Annual Conference of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, Detroit, MI.

TARA MORTENSEN, BRIAN MCDERMOTT (University of Massachusetts Amherst Faculty), and BOB WERTZ (SJMC PhD Student)

Paper accepted to AEJMC: Measuring How Presentational Context and Professional Authorship Affects Credibility Perceptions of News Images

Citation: McDermott, B., Mortensen, T., Wertz, B. 2022, August). Measuring How Presentational Context and Professional Authorship Affects Credibility Perceptions of News Images. [Paper presentation]. Paper to be presented at the Annual Conference of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication. Detroit, MI.

Abstract: Today, photojournalists publish images in news publications as well as social media and images captured by ordinary citizens appear in journalism spaces. This study examines how photo content and context of its publication space influences credibility perceptions. The exceedingly small difference in how respondents rate the credibility of the images suggests that participants in this study are willing to accept newsworthy images as credible on social media, and social media images as credible in the news.


JOURNAL ARTICLES

BROOKE MCKEEVER, MINHEE CHOI (Ph.D. alumna), DENETRA WALKER (Ph.D. alumna), and ROBERT MCKEEVER (SJMC Faculty)

Citation: McKeever, B. W., Choi, M., Walker, D., & McKeever, R. (2022). Gun violence as a public health issue: Media advocacy, framing and implications for communication. Newspaper Research Journal. https://doi.org/10.1177/07395329221090497

Abstract: Following a recent push to reframe gun violence as a public health issue, an online survey (N = 510) helped explore frame salience and frame adoption through the lens of media advocacy. Findings revealed that gun control and gun rights frames are salient, and television, social media and newspapers are the most popular sources of gun violence information. Individuals are being held responsible, while background checks were the most salient and adopted solution among Americans. Three gun rights organizations were the most salient organizations from media coverage related to gun violence. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed.

Link: https://doi.org/10.1177/07395329221090497

JUNGMI JUN, ALI ZAIN (Ph.D. student), YINGYING CHEN (SJMC Faculty), and SEI-HILL KIM (SJMC Faculty)

Citation: Jun, J., Zain, A., Chen, Y., & Kim, S.-H. (2022). Adverse Mentions, Negative Sentiment, and Emotions in COVID-19 Vaccine Tweets and Their Association with Vaccination Uptake: Global Comparison of 192 Countries. Vaccines, 10(5). https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines10050735

Abstract: Background: Many countries show low COVID-19 vaccination rates despite high levels of readiness and delivery of vaccines. The public’s misperceptions, hesitancy, and negative emotions toward vaccines are psychological factors discouraging vaccination. At the individual level, studies have revealed negative perceptual/behavioral outcomes of COVID-19 information exposure via social media where misinformation and vaccine fear flood. Objective: This study extends research context to the global level and investigates social media discourse on the COVID-19 vaccine and its association with vaccination rates of 192 countries in the world. Methods: COVID-19 vaccine tweets were compared by country in terms of (1) the number per million Twitter users, (2) mentions of adverse events—death, side-effects, blood clots, (3) negative sentiment (vs. positive), and (4) fear, sadness, or anger emotions (vs. joy). Artificial intelligence (AI) was adopted to classify sentiment and emotions. Such tweets and covariates (COVID-19 morbidity and mortality rates, GDP, population size and density, literacy rate, democracy index, institutional quality, human development index) were tested as predictors of vaccination rates in countries. Results: Over 21.3 million COVID-19 vaccine tweets posted between November 2020 and August 2021 worldwide were included in our analysis. The global average of COVID-19 vaccine tweets mentioning adverse events was 2% for ‘death’, 1.15% for ‘side-effects’, and 0.80% for ‘blood clots’. Negative sentiment appeared 1.90 times more frequently than positive sentiment. Fear, anger, or sadness appeared 0.70 times less frequently than joy. The mention of ‘side-effects’ and fear/sadness/anger emotions appeared as significant predictors of vaccination rates, along with the human development index. Conclusions: Our findings indicate that global efforts to combat misinformation, address negative emotions, and promote positive languages surrounding COVID-19 vaccination on social media may help increase global vaccination uptakes.

Link: https://www.mdpi.com/2076-393X/10/5/735/htm#B49-vaccines-10-00735

SABRINA HABBIB

Brainstorming in groups can be tricky. This article has research-based suggestions of how to make it work.

Citation: Habbib, S. (2022, May) How to brainstorm brilliant ideas in teams – without sliding into ‘groupthink’. The Conversation.

Link: https://theconversation.com/how-to-brainstorm-brilliant-ideas-in-teams-without-sliding-into-groupthink-180084?utm_source=twitter&utm_medium=bylinetwitterbutton 


PANELS/PRESENTATIONS

CANDICE EDRINGTON

Recently, I presented on a panel at the Institute for Public Relations Bridge Conference. This panel discussed the shift from traditional corporate social responsibility (CSR) to corporate social advocacy (CSA) and its implications.

Citation: Shifting from CSR to CSA: Corporate and activist insights for professional communicators. Institute for Public Relations Bridge Conference

Abstract: Companies are increasingly being pressured to engage in public conversations and take stances on polarizing issues—shifting or expanding efforts traditionally thought of as Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) to Corporate Social Advocacy (CSA). What does this shift mean for corporations and communicators? This panel investigates the CSA shift’s implications from the perspectives of activism, connections to organizational values, and best practices for engagement and messaging in polarizing issue discourse.

LAURA SMITH, DAVID MOSCOWITZ (SJMC Faculty), NINA BROOK (SJMC Faculty), BERTRAM RANTIN (SJMC Faculty), and ERIC ROBINSON (SJMC Faculty)

Citation: Smith, L.K. (2022, March 29). Shoulder-to-Shoulder: Best practices for collaborative assessment. Invited coordinator and presenter on panel about the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning. Center for Teaching Excellence, Columbia, SC.

LAURA SMITH

This talk compared a writing rubric produced by the American Association of Colleges & University to one we're testing here in the SJMC (with Nina Brook and Bertram Rantin in our foundational writing course, J291).

Citation: name of your publication, where it was published, etc.)

Smith., L.K. (2022, April 19) Applying Value rubrics to journalistic writing in entry-level communications courses. Invited panelist on "Adding VALUE to Broadcast Education: An Introduction to AAC&Us VALUE Rubrics" at Broadcast Education Association's annual conference, Las Vegas, NV.

LAURA SMITH

Each year, BEA hosts a half-day bootcamp about assessment practices across the country. I've been invited to participate for the last several years. This year, I presented data for an experiment we're conducting in our JOUR 303 law classes to determine whether students perform better when we assess student learning in optional quiz at the end of the semster versus embed the questions in the final exam. I presented results from three years of study. Thanks to Eric Robinson and Carmen Maye for their consistent and collegial work on this project!

Citation: Smith, L.K. (2022, April 20). Invited presenter, Assessment Bootcamp at Broadcast Education Association's annual conference, Las Vegas, NV.

LAURA SMITH

Executing a successful assessment plan can be challenging enough. For many, Covid made our efforts that much harder. In some programs, data collection ceased completely. In others, the Covid crisis led to new and creative ways to collect the data. Panelists addressed some of the experiences they’ve had collecting data in the past two years and adaptations they’ve been forced to make – adaptations they embrace and may event stick with in the future. Panelists included Marquita Smith, Asst. Dean of Graduate Programs @ Ole Miss, Mary Jackson-Pitts, Professor @ Arkansas State and Robert Spicer, Associate Professor @ Millersville (PA) University.

Citation: Smith, L.K. (2022, April 23). Assessment in a time of Covid: Concerns and Opportunities. Panel producer and presenter at Broadcast Education Association's annual conference, Las Vegas, NV.


OTHER

KELLY DAVIS

Kelly Davis was selected by the Public Relations Student Society of America to serve on the inaugural PRSSA National Faculty Advisory Council. The five council members will work closely with the PRSSA National Faculty Adviser and National Headquarters to connect with fellow chapter-level advisers, offer town hall-style virtual meetings, onboard new advisers, and more. Davis has served as the faculty adviser for the UofSC PRSSA chapter since 2017.

BOOK/BOOK CHAPTER

AUGIE GRANT, ERIC ROBINSON (SJMC Faculty – Regulation), EHSAN MOHAMMADI (iSchool Faculty – Big Data), AMIR KARAMI (iSchool Faculty – Big Data), and YICHENG ZHU (PhD Alum – History of Communication Technology)

Communication Technology Update and Fundamentals, 18th edition, published April 2022 by Austin-based Technology Futures, Inc.

Citation: Grant, A. E. & Meadows, J. H. (Eds.) (2022). Communication Technology Update and Fundamentals, 18th edition. Technology Futures, Inc.

Abstract: The latest edition of the book begins with a section covering the fundamentals of communication technology in five chapterss that explain the communication technology ecosystem, its history, theories, structure, and regulations. Separate chapters then explore the background, recent developments, and current status of two dozen technologies in electronic mass media, computers, consumer electronics, telephony, and networking. The chapters are written by experts who provide a snapshot of an individual field. Together, these updates provide a broad overview of these industries and examine the role communication technologies play in our everyday lives. In addition to substantial updates to each chapter, the 18th edition includes first-ever chapters on surveillance and remote working and learning, plus updated user data in every chapter; an overview of industry structure, including recent and proposed mergers and acquisitions; and sidebars about people who have made a lasting contribution to communication technologies, with an emphasis on women and people of color.

Link: www.tfi-ctu.com


JOURNAL ARTICLES

JABARI EVANS

On April 1, I received acceptance letter for an article entitled "The Audacity of Clout(chasing)" in the International Journal of Communication. The article is a collaboration with Dr. Nancy Baym, whom was my mentor at Microsoft Research.

Citation: Evans, J.M. & Baym, N.K. (forthcoming, accepted 4/1/22) The Audacity of Clout(chasing):Digital Strategies of Black Youth in Chicago DIY Hip-Hop. International Journal of Communication.

Abstract: Though many scholars have theorized on the communication of Black youth in digital spaces, academic work has generally not sought artist perspectives of how their platformed creation might be connected to relational labor. Using observation and interviews with artists, artist managers and entrepreneurs, we examine relational practices of Hip-Hop youth on social media. We describe their work on social media toward acquiring “clout”—a digital form of influence self-described by emerging musicians as allowing them to leverage digital tools in building social and professional status, amplify authenticity, cultivate connections with fans, connect to friends and other cultural producers. In this study, we detail examples of three relational strategies that our respondents utilized to acquire clout: (a) corralling (b) capping, and (c) co-signing. To conclude, we argue Chicago’s Hip-Hop scene provides an example of why formal institutions and researchers need to rethink how race, class, gender, and geography influence the digital interactions of young people and how their social practices add to the understanding of the counter-publics arising from globalizing social media.

BROOKE MCKEEVER, MINHEE CHOI (Ph.D. Alumna), DENETRA WALKER (Ph.D. Alumna), and ROBERT MCKEEVER (SJMC Faculty)

Citation: McKeever, B.W., Choi, M., Walker, D., & McKeever, R. (2022). Gun violence as a public health issue: Media advocacy, framing and implications for communication. Newspaper Research Journal. https://doi.org/10.1177/07395329221090497

Abstract: Following a recent push to reframe gun violence as a public health issue, an online survey (N = 510) helped explore frame salience and frame adoption through the lens of media advocacy. Findings revealed that gun control and gun rights frames are salient, and television, social media and newspapers are the most popular sources of gun violence information. Individuals are being held responsible, while background checks were the most salient and adopted solution among Americans. Three gun rights organizations were the most salient organizations from media coverage related to gun violence. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed.


PANELS/PRESENTATIONS

CANDICE EDRINGTON
Greenville, SC April 6-10

I presented on the Movement Rhetoric/Rhetoric's Movements panel at the Southern States Communication Association.

Abstract: This thematic panel takes up the question of how and why individuals, collectives, and institutions are moved, changed, and transformed through social communicative action. Participants will consider rhetorical scholarship, particularly new books and proposals in the University of South Carolina Press series of the same name, that examine the work of social justice and grassroots movements enacted via digital and embodied means. Additionally, participants will discuss social movement pedagogy along with cases of social communicative actions that are driven by corporate and economic interests and that can help us to better understand the rhetorical and material impediments to achieving the goals of justice and equity.

CANDICE EDRINGTON
Oxford, MS at The University of Mississippi, March 31-April 2

I was identified as a leading researcher in public relations and asked to present on the role of advocacy and social justice in PR at the inaugural IMC Connect! conference.

Abstract: This collaborative conference connected leading researchers and industry practitioners in the field of integrated marketing communication. The purpose of the conference was to provide critical insights related to crisis communication, big data, social media, public relations and advertising.

Link: https://express.adobe.com/page/lkQpxIR7Izolf/


SPEAKING ENGAGEMENTS

AMIR KARAMI

Dr. Karami was invited to give a virtual talk at Leiden University in the Netherlands. The title of his talk was Methodological Challenges of Studying Social Media. Leiden University ranks among the top 100 universities in the world.

AMIR KARAMI

Dr. Karami was invited to give a virtual talk at the IÉSEG School of Management. The title of his talk was Taming Health Dis/Misinformation on Social Media with Data Science Lash. IÉSEG School of Management is one of the top Business Schools in France, ranked 21st in the world by the Financial Times.

AWARDS/GRANTS

CLAYTON COPELAND
Dr. Copeland was appointed to Library of the Year Committee, National Library Service for the Blind and Print Disabled, Library of Congress

AMIR KARAMI and JACQUELINE PURTELL (Honors Student)
Jacqueline Purtell (Honors Student) and Dr. Karami (Mentor) received the Honors College Research Grant to analyze vaccine Dis/Misinformation on social media.

AMIR KARAMI
Dr. Karami received the International Healthcare 2021 Young Investigator Award. This award is for researchers who are under 40.

Link: https://www.mdpi.com/journal/healthcare/awards/1326


BOOK/BOOK CHAPTER

BROOKE MCKEEVER and MINHEE CHOI (Ph.D. alumna)
Citation: McKeever, B.W., Choi, M. (2022). Philanthropic Crisis Communication. Invited book chapter published in Social Media and Crisis Communication, 2nd Edition, edited by Lucinda Austin and Yan Jin.

Link: https://www.routledge.com/Social-Media-and-Crisis-Communication/Jin-Austin/p/book/9780367489007


CONFERENCE PAPER

CANDICE EDRINGTON, TARA MORTENSEN (SJMC faculty), and ODERA ENZENNA ( SKMC Ph.D. student)
Citation: Edrington, C., Mortensen, T., Ezenna, O. (2022, March). Cultural Projection via #IAmABlackMan Challenge on Instagram. Presented at the Association of Educators in Journalism and Mass Communication Southeast Colloquium. Memphis, TN. Visual Communication Division. Research In Progress.

Abstract: The purpose of the proposed research study is to analyze Instagram photos posted by Black men with the #iamablackman hashtag challenge caption to assess the nature of cultural projection as visually and verbally communicated through Instagram, to examine how others interpret the cultural projection of Black men through these images, and to understand the overall sentiments surrounding the hashtag challenge.

BROOKE MCKEEVER, MINHEE CHOI (Ph.D. alumna), and HOLLY OVERTON (former SJMC faculty)
Citation: Choi, M., McKeever, B.W., Overton, H. (2022, May). A configurational approach to public relations research on prosocial behaviors. Research accepted for presentation at the International Communication Association (ICA) Conference in Paris, France.

FEILI TU-KEEFNER and ABBY BRICKER (MLIS student)
Citation: Tu-Keefner, F., Hobbs, A., & Bricker, A. (2022, March). Is your COVID-19 health information understood by adults in the general public? A content analysis of online resources published by the CDC and the WHO. In Proceedings of the International Congress of Medical Librarianship (ICML) and the Association for Health Information and Libraries in Africa (AHILA) Joint Conference. (In Press)

Abstract: Because uncertainty, great fear, conspiracy theories, and distrust are associated with the current COVID-19 pandemic, people need access to accurate and easy-to-understand information to help them act appropriately. Major public health organizations worldwide, such as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in the United States and the World Health Organization (WHO), have created web portals to rapidly release authoritative COVID-19 health information to a large population. It is essential to examine whether the authoritative COVID-19 health information distributed by these two major public health organizations facilitates health information access by the adults from the general public. The research design for this study is based on Savolainen’s everyday life information concepts and Dervin’s sense-making methodology. The research purposes are to 1) better understand the connections between readability levels and consumer health information comprehension; 2) investigate whether the authoritative COVID-19 health information provided can support the evidence-based health information access activities of adults from American general public. This study examines the levels of readability and comprehension of the COVID-19 health information distributed by the CDC and by the WHO. The sample populations analyzed are identified through accessing the COVID-19 health information shared on the public library systems’ websites of the twenty largest cities in the United States. Microsoft Office software is utilized for content analysis and to calculate the averages of the readability scores of the COVID-19 health information provided by targeted organizations.


JOURNAL ARTICLES

KEVIN HULL and LAUREN SCHWARTZ (former SJMC undergraduate student)
Citation: Hull, K., Billings, A. C., & Schwartz, L. (2021). The “Mighty Kacy” Effect? American Ninja Warrior and the elevation of women athletes. Journal of Sports Media, 16(2), 111-131.

Abstract: Contrary to previous sports studies demonstrating that sports within prime-time television programming minimize women athletes both in terms of exposure and the characterization of athletes when they are shown, the NBC-based athletic reality program American Ninja Warrior seemingly challenges such traditions. A study of a full season of the hit program reveals that only two significant dialogue differences emerged, disproportionately complimenting the speed of male competitors and the strength of female competitors. Otherwise, nonsignificant differences were found within the sample, perhaps revealing progress in the degree to which new renderings of sports media could be built on structures less premised in hegemonic masculinity.

Link: https://muse.jhu.edu/article/848009

KEVIN HULL, DENETRA WALKER (SJMC PhD student), KIRSTIN PELLIZZARO (SJMC faculty), AND MILES ROMNEY (former SJMC faculty)
Citation: Hull, K., Walker, D., Romney, M., & Pellizzaro, K. (accepted for publication). “Through our Prism”: A survey of Black local sports journalists’ work experiences and interactions with Black athletes. Journalism Practice.

Abstract: Black local television sports journalists throughout the United States were surveyed to discover how they view both their perceived place in the newsroom and media treatment of, and their own interactions with, Black athletes. The majority say that Black athletes are negatively stereotyped and that, as Black journalists, they have an easier time relating to and telling the story of the Black athlete. Using a thematic analysis of the open-ended comments, the authors found perspective, realization of racism, discriminatory hiring practices, and emotional labor to be common themes. Findings from this mixed methods study point to their belief that hiring more Black television sports journalists could improve coverage of Black athletes, but there are doubts that those job opportunities exist. When discussing their own experiences, the Black television sports journalists said there is some “tokenism” within television station hiring practices that makes it difficult for many of them to be hired. Practical implications for the future of sports journalism and newsroom diversity is discussed.

Link: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/17512786.2022.2050468

BROOKE MCKEEVER and YUE ZHENG (Ph.D. alumna)
Citation: Zheng, Y., & McKeever, B.W. (2022). Improving mobile donations: Exploring an advanced technology acceptance model, media preferences, and demographics of mobile donors. International Journal of Mobile Communications, 20(2), 242-261.

Abstract: Mobile donations, contributions made by sending a text message, have been possible for more than a decade and have led to successful fundraising campaigns such as one following an earthquake in Haiti in 2010. However, most mobile phone users have never used this technology and few campaigns have come close to the funds raised for Haiti earthquake relief. To examine people's motivations to make mobile donations, this study conducted a national survey with 994 USA-based respondents to explore an advanced version of the technology acceptance model. By comparing the findings between those who have previously made mobile donations and those who have not, perceived credibility was identified as a key factor to motivate non-donors. This research also explored how mobile donation motivations varied across multiple media preference and demographic variables, which contributes practical implications for non-profit organizations to improve future fundraising efforts.

Link: https://www.inderscienceonline.com/doi/abs/10.1504/IJMC.2022.121441

BROOKE MCKEEVER and MINHEE CHOI (Ph.D. alumna)
Citation: Choi, M., McKeever, B.W. (2022). Social media advocacy and gun violence: Applying the engagement model to nonprofit organizations' communication efforts. Public Relations Review. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pubrev.2022.102173

Abstract: Applying the model of engagement, this study tests the effectiveness of social media advocacy strategies, framing, and mobilizing information related to nonprofit organizations’ communication about the issue of gun violence. An online experiment revealed successful social media advocacy strategies within the engagement model. Two key components of social media advocacy were identified: (1) public relations practitioners’ roles in shaping messages and mobilizing publics; (2) the important role of marginalized groups and individuals in issue amplification.

Link: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0363811122000285?dgcid=author

BROOKE MCKEEVER, JOHN A BERNHART (Arnold School of Public Health alumna), SARA WILCOX (Arnold School of Public Health faculty), and JENNIFER O’NEIL (Arnold School of Public Health faculty)
Citation: Bernhart, J.A., Wilcox, S., McKeever, B.W., Ehlers, D.K., O’Neill, J.R. (2022). A self-determination theory application to physical activity in charity sports events. American Journal of Lifestyle Medicine. DOI: 10.1177/15598276221077204

Abstract: Charity sports events, specifically 5K events, reach large numbers of people and may help promote physical activity (PA). Few studies exist applying Self-Determination Theory (SDT) to participation in these events. This study examined changes in SDT constructs of Autonomy, Competence, and Relatedness satisfaction in participants (n = 207) of charity 5K events and (2) examined relationships among post-event SDT constructs, PA, and intention to complete future events. Participants completed online surveys before and after a charity 5K event using the Psychological Needs Satisfaction in Exercise Scale, Behavioral Regulation in Exercise Questionnaire-2, and International Physical Activity Questionnaire-Short Form. Repeated measures analysis of covariance analyzed the first purpose and regression the second. Competence satisfaction increased (P = .04) and relatedness satisfaction decreased (P = .04). Higher post-event relatedness satisfaction was associated with intention to complete future charity 5K events (OR = 1.05, 95% CI: 1.00, 1.11). Higher post-event autonomy, competence, and relatedness satisfaction and intrinsic motivation were associated with greater post-event MET-minutes of PA (all P < .05). Findings may be useful for promoting PA and helping organizations increase participation. Specifically, events facilitating relatedness among participants may lead to repeat participation as these events have opportunities to fulfill SDT outcomes and increase post-event PA.

Link: https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/15598276221077204

BRETT ROBERTSON
Citation: Stephens, K. K., Powers, C., Robertson, B. W., Sperling, L., Collier, J., Tich, K., & Smith, W. R. (2022). Building more resilient communities with a wildfire preparedness drill in the U.S.: Individual and community influences and communication practices. Journal of Contingencies and Crisis Management

Link: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/1468-5973.12402

ANLI XIAO
Citation: Overton, H. K. & Xiao, A. (accepted). Conscience-Driven Corporate Social Advocacy: Analyzing Moral Conviction and Perceived Motives as Predictors of Organization-Public Relationships. Corporate Communication: An International Journal


PANELS/PRESENTATIONS

BROOKE MCKEEVER
Brooke was invited to be the Opening Plenary Speaker at the Second Annual SC Center for Rural and Primary Healthcare Learning Collaborative Meeting, which took place on March 4, 2022. Her presentation was titled, "Communicating Impact and Influencing Change."

FEILI TU-KEEFNER
Citation: Tu-Keefner, F., Lyons, D. R., Liu, J., Hobbs, A., & Smith, J. C. (2022, March 23-25). Librarians lead in times of crisis: Stop, drop & roll. To be presented at the Public Library Association Conference, Portland OR.

Abstract: Society today expects libraries to be not just information service providers, but to also serve as catalysts for community engagement. The mission of librarians is to improve society through facilitating knowledge creation, preservation, and dissemination. When the pandemic hit the nation, the majority of libraries had to close their doors. Libraries nationwide took the opportunity to transform their service to various types of formats and continue the provision of essential information services to their user communities. Various types of innovative and virtual information services have been developed and implemented. This presentation covers how librarians have stepped up to being leaders to the communities they serve, especially focusing on how librarians have gone far and beyond to provide non-traditional library services to their communities. Several examples will be provided. Librarians’ leadership qualifications in time of crisis will be addressed. These qualifications are from the results of three situation-specific studies on the provision of disaster health-information services by public libraries. The significance of creating diversified workforces in libraries, as well as how to integrate equality, diversity, and inclusion (EDI) in the libraries’ strategic plans will be also addressed. The presentation will end with a discussion of what lessons have been learned from the pandemic.

Link: https://www.placonference.org/programs.cfm?session_key=9797E5FD-A986-572E-6BFE-AF31E51F6CAB&session_date=Thursday,%20Mar%2024,%202022

FEILI TU-KEEFNER and ABBY BRICKER (MLIS student)
Citation: Tu-Keefner, F., Hobbs, A., & Bricker, A. (2022, March 15-19). Is the COVID-19 health information that you provided understood by your general public users? A content analytical study. Presented at the International Congress of Medical Librarianship (ICML) and the Association for Health Information and Libraries in Africa (AHILA) Joint Conference, Pretoria, South Africa.

Abstract: Because uncertainty, great fear, conspiracy theories, and distrust are associated with the current COVID-19 pandemic, people need access to accurate and easy-to-understand information to help them act appropriately. Major public health organizations worldwide, such as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in the United States and the World Health Organization (WHO), have created web portals to rapidly release authoritative COVID-19 health information to a large population. It is essential to examine whether the authoritative COVID-19 health information distributed by these two major public health organizations facilitates health information access by the adults from the general public. The research design for this study is based on Savolainen's everyday life information concepts and Dervin's sense-making methodology. The research purposes are to 1) better understand the connections between readability levels and consumer health information comprehension; 2) investigate whether the authoritative COVID-19 health information provided can support the evidence-based health information access activities of adults from the general public. This study examines the levels of readability and comprehension of the COVID-19 health information distributed by the CDC and by the WHO. The sample populations analyzed are identified through accessing the COVID-19 health information shared on the public library systems’ websites of the twenty largest cities in the United States. Microsoft Office software is utilized for content analysis and to calculate the averages of the readability scores of the COVID-19 health information provided by targeted organizations.

Link: https://icml2022.org/programme

AWARDS/GRANTS

AMIR KARAMI, XIAOMING LI, and JIAJIA ZHANG

With multi-department collaborations, Dr. Amir Karami has received an NIH grant to mentor researchers at the intersection of social media, data science, and infectious diseases.

ALI ZAIN

Top Student Paper Award for "Online endorsed misinformation and climate change: using heuristic cues to assess perceived credibility of messages and sharing intentions" at the 47th Annual AEJMC Southeast Colloquium (SEC ’22) to be held in Memphis, United States on March 17-19, 2022.

Citation: Zain, A. (2022, March). Online endorsed misinformation and climate change: using heuristic cues to assess perceived credibility of messages and sharing intentions. 47th Annual AEJMC Southeast Colloquium (SEC ’22). Memphis, United States.


BOOK/BOOK CHAPTER

KEVIN HULL

My solo-authored textbook, Sports Broadcasting, was published a few weeks ago.

Citation: Hull, K. (2022). Sports Broadcasting. Human Kinetics.

Link: https://us.humankinetics.com/products/sports-broadcasting-with-hkpropel-access


CONFERENCE PAPER

ALI ZAIN and JUNGMI JUN

Global Comparison of COVID-19 Vaccination Sentiments and Emotions on Twitter: Findings from 192 Countries presented at the National Big Data Health Science Conference (BDHS ’22). Columbia, United States.

Citation: Jun, J. and Zain, A. (2022, February). Global Comparison of COVID-19 Vaccination Sentiments and Emotions on Twitter: Findings from 192 Countries. National Big Data Health Science Conference (BDHS ’22). Columbia, United States.

LEIGH MOSCOWITZ

Paper accepted to the 72nd Annual ICA Conference in Paris, France: My research team and I have had a paper accepted to this year's upcoming ICA annual conference. The paper is entitled "The Paradoxical Big Non-Story: Traditional and Social Media Frames Surrounding Carl Nassib, the NFL’s First Openly Gay Player."

Citation: Moscowitz, L., Billings, A. C., Gentile, P., & Jackson, J. (2021). The Paradoxical Big Non-Story: Traditional and Social Media Frames Surrounding Carl Nassib, the NFL’s First Openly Gay Player. Paper accepted to 72nd Annual ICA Conference, Paris, France (forthcoming, May 2022).

Abstratct: In June of 2021, National Football League (NFL) defensive lineman Carl Nassib made history as the first openly gay, active professional football player to come out. Advancing research about news coverage of LGBT athletes, this paper employs content analysis to analyze the frames used in newspaper articles (n=195) and on social media (n=5,588 tweets) to report the story of Nassib’s coming out. Findings indicate overall support for Nassib’s coming out, as both newspapers and Twitter posts framed the story as a watershed moment and focused on celebrity support; however, personal attacks were more common on social media. Implications for how media cover gay athlete stories are discussed.

LEIGH MOSCOWITZ

Paper Presented at BEA 2022: My research team and I have had a paper accepted to the Broadcast Education Association's (BEA) 2022 conference in Las Vegas in April. The paper is entitled, "Well, He is Paid to be Violent...": How Athlete Identity Alters Perceptions of Domestic Violence Incidents.

Citation: Brown, K., Billings, A., Moscowitz, L., & Lewis, M. (2021). "Well, He is Paid to be Violent…”: How Athlete Identity Alters Perceptions of Domestic Violence Incidents. Paper accepted to 2022 BEA Annual Conference, Las Vegas, NV (forthcoming, April 2022).

Abstratct: The media coverage of domestic violence in professional sports does not carry equal weight; narratives of race, gender, class, and sexuality define which crimes get the most attention and how perpetrators and victims are portrayed. The purpose of this study is to determine if perceptions of violence related to race, gender and sport will impact audience reactions to domestic violence charges against an athlete.

JUNGMI JUN and ALI ZAIN

Citation: Jun, J., & Zain, A. (2022). Global comparison of ‘COVID-19 vaccination’ sentiments and emotions on Twitter: Findings from 192 countries. Presented at the SC Big Data Health Sciences Center Conference.

Abstract: Many countries show low COVID-19 vaccination rates despite their high levels of readiness and delivery of vaccines. Research suggests the public’s misperceptions, hesitancy, and negative emotions towards vaccines are psychological factors discouraging vaccination. At the individual level, a growing number of studies have revealed negative perceptual and behavioral outcomes of COVID-19 information exposure via social media where misinformation floods. Yet, there is a scarcity of research investigating social media discourses on COVID-19 vaccination and its association with vaccination rates at the national level. We compared COVID-19 vaccination related tweets among 192 countries in terms of the proportion of tweets (1) mentioning adverse effects of COVID-19 vaccine (e.g., death, blood clots), (2) negative sentiment (vs. positive), and (3) negative emotions (vs. joy). We also test the effects of such tweets and covariates (COVID-19 morbidity and mortality rates, GDP, population size and density, literacy rate, democracy index, institutional quality, human development index) in predicting countries’ vaccination rates.

JUNGMI JUN, KIM JOONKYOUNG, OVERTON HOLLY, ROBERTSON BRETT, BELLA NANDINI, ZAIN, ALI, and PIACENTINE COLIN

Citation: Kim, J., Jun, J., Overton, H., Robertson, B., Bhalla, N., & Ciccarelli, C. (2022). Science, faith, and information sources as drivers of individuals' perceptions of COVID-19 risk and mask-wearing intention. Accepted to present at the International Communication Association Annual Conference. Paris. France [Hybrid].

Abstract: The COVID-19 pandemic has led many countries to implement safety guidelines to prevent the spread of the virus. An online survey using a U.S. sample (N = 374) was conducted to investigate the determinants of individuals’ intention to adhere to COVID-19 safety measures such as wearing a mask. Results indicate that authoritative COVID-19 information sources (e.g., the CDC) were associated with individuals’ higher risk perceptions of COVID-19 and intention to wear a mask, whereas faith-based organizations as non-authoritative sources were negatively associated with risk perceptions and behavioral intentions. Individuals’ belief in science but not belief in God’s control over their health appeared as a positive predictor of risk perceptions and behavioral intentions.


JOURNAL ARTICLES

TARA MORTENSEN

Routine and Individual-Level Influences on Newspaper Front-Page Images: Wire Photographs, Staff Photojournalism, Race and Gender

Abstract: This study uncovers routine and individual-level influences upon the content of US front-page images. This examination is justified by a news-image environment increasingly dominated by a small number of central agencies and with a lack of photojournalist diversity. At the routine level, differences are assessed based on whether images are taken by an on-staff photojournalist or a wire photographer. At the individual level, differences are assessed based on the photographer’s race and gender. The visual content studied includes three general categories: photojournalistic news values (presence of people, activity of persons of people in the image, whether eye contact is portrayed, emotional hierarchy, and topic), representation (race and gender of people or persons in the image), and visual elevation (circulation of the image in which the image appears, image usage, and image topic). Results of the study show a number of significant routine-level differences, but fewer differences based on the individual characteristics of the photojournalist, which primarily pertain to the representation of subjects.

Link: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/17512786.2022.2033635?scroll=top&needAccess=true

JABARI EVANS

I published this empirical paper in the Journal of Global Hip-Hop Studies on Chicago's controversial Drill Music scene. I argue that despite ambivalence over the promotion of violence, potential threats to their well-being on the streets and negative stereotypes of Black men within their communication, my respondents saw their promotional content creation on social media as a form of 'social hacking' (a creative means to pursuing upward social mobility) the music industry through the attention economy. I theorize two particular self-described labor practices (capping and corralling) to argue this point.

Citation: Evans, J. M. (2022). We (MOSTLY) Carry Guns for the Internet: Visibility Labour, Social Hacking and Chasing Digital Clout by Black Male Youth in Chicago’s Drill Rap Scene. Journal of Global Hip Hop Studies, 1(2), 227–47.

Abstract: Much negative attention has been given to the ‘drill’ music genre, a subgenre of gangsta rap that was born in Chicago’s underground hip hop scene in early 2010s. Previous scholarship has highlighted how social media has shifted how gang-affiliated youth in Chicago carefully manage their street reputations, communicate with peers and fuel gang rivalries through platformed creation. Yet still, in the context of drill, I argue that social media self-branding practices also provide these youth a way out of containment and sequestration to gain visibility in the music industry and empower their neighbourhoods. Based on interviews with drill recording artists and their support workers, I explore the content and character of their work, the centrality of work ethic to their racial identity construction and the way they use social media work to build and maintain status, authenticity and cultivate connections with fans, friends and other cultural producers. Bridging traditional theories of urban sociology with emerging new media scholarship, I suggest this group of artists is a representative case of how the digital practices of disadvantaged Black youth have typically gone mischaracterized in the literature. This study offers new insights into ‘capping’ as an important tenet to hip hop’s visibility labour on social media and how the ‘always on’ nature of digital labour adds another dimension to the typical utilization of street authenticity in narratives of hip hop music. This article concludes by illuminating the many deep contradictions and misconceptions about technological ingenuity, Black youth agency, hip hop culture and street credibility in urban communities.

Link: https://doi.org/10.1386/ghhs_00019_1


PANELS/PRESENTATIONS

CANDICE EDRINGTON

I presented on a panel for the AEJMC's Public Relations Division Virtual Conference. The title of the panel was "Managing Collective Trauma in the PR Classroom".

Abstract: PR educators fill a variety of roles for students, one being a source of mental and emotional support in times of distress (Auger & Formentin, 2021; Madden & Del Rosso, 2021). As society reels from events such as the murder of George Floyd, violent storms and wildfires, the insurrection of the US Capitol, and a deadly pandemic, communities often experience collective trauma -- shared memories of, reactions to, and feelings towards societal events that affect everyone (Hirschberger, 2018). In terms of managing collective trauma, PR educators are shouldered with two central tasks in the PR classroom: 1) supporting students’ mental health through the events that influence individual and collective well-being and 2) helping students consider the role that PR plays in fostering the shared meaning that can help communities heal from collective trauma. This panel asks – how are we helping students navigate the collective stress and trauma the last two years have undoubtedly brought? How do PR and professional communication help us make meaning about what students and educators have experienced and how these experiences inform our pedagogy? What types of challenges have PR educators faced and how are they supporting one another? This panel spotlights PR educators who investigate risk/crisis, advocacy and social change, and dissensus/contentious issues to unpack what we can do to help students navigate the effects of collective trauma and help students forge paths forward to use PR for collective healing.

AWARDS/GRANTS

BRETT ROBERTSON

Winner of the 2021 National Communication Association (NCA) Communication and Aging Division Outstanding Dissertation Award

JUNGMI JUN, MIRANDA BUTLER (Honors Student and PR Major), and MEGHAN WHITTLE (Honors Student)

These students won Magellan Scholar award ($3,650) by the Office of Research. This funding will support their social media research project - "The New Frontier or a Billionaire’s Joy Ride? Artificial Intelligence Driven Analysis of Twitter Conversations of the SpaceX Company."

ROBERT MCKEEVER, JUNGMI JUN, JOON KYOUNG KIM (PhD alumnus), KAREN WILKERSHAM (School of Nursing), BRETT ROBERTSON, CHRISTOPHER NOLAND (PhD alumnus), and CARL CICCARELLI (PhD student)

Colorectal Cancer Prevention Network (CCPN) Research Grant

Citation: McKeever, R., Jun, J., Kim, J.K., Wikersham, K., Robertson, B., Noland, C., & Ciccarelli, C. (2022). Identifying Optimal Visual Narratives to Impact African American Men’s Colorectal Cancer Risk Awareness and Screening Uptake. $19,915 grant awarded by the Colorectal Cancer Prevention Network (CCPN).

JEFFREY WILLIAMS

CIEL grant for the Community of Practice

Creation of a pilot film that follows the journey of the students enrolled in Maymester at the Circus before, during and after the course.


CONFERENCE PAPER

YINGYING CHEN, JACOB LONG (SJMC faculty), JUNGMI JUN (SJMC faculty), SEI-HILL KIM (SJMC faculty), ALI ZAIN (PhD student), and COLIN PIACENTINE (PhD student)

Citation: Chen, Y., Long, J., Jun J., Kim, S., Zain, A., & Piacentine, C. (2022). Anti-intellectualism amid the Covid-19 pandemic: The dynamics of anti-Fauci discourse on Twitter. Paper accepted by the 72nd Annual International Communications Association Conference (political communication session), Paris, France.

Abstract: The aim of this study is to understand anti-intellectual discourse and their dynamics and sources on social media. Anti-intellectualism, defined as a generalized distrust of experts and intellectuals has become a major obstacle for the public compliance with health policies and behaviors recommended by experts and governments. However, few studies investigate how people express anti-intellectualism and how such speech evolves over time on social media. Analyzing anti-Fauci tweets as a case study, we showed the presence of three types of discourses: people-scientist antagonism, delegitimizing science-based decision-making sovereignty, and delegitimizing truth-speaking sovereignty in anti-Fauci speech being shared on Twitter. Delegitimizing science-based decision-making sovereignty remained to be the major anti-intellectual discourse over time.

YINGYING CHEN

Citation: Chen, Y., Dong, C., Rodgers, K., Thorson, K., Baykaldi, S. & Cotter, K. (2022). Local civic information beyond the news: Computational identification of civic content on social media. Paper presented at the 72nd Annual International Communications Association Conference, Paris, France.

Abstract: Local news media used to be the central source for local civic information. As local news organizations dilapidated, the rise of Facebook provides infrastructure opportunities for non-news organizations to directly engage citizens. Thus, non-news organizations on Facebook shift the local civic information infrastructure as sources of civic information. The transformation in information ecology and infrastructure is missing in the current definition of civic information, which still perceives local news as local civic information. Using a combination of computational methods and human coding, we first classify distinct types of civic information in the Facebook posts of multiple types of community organizations, both news and non-news, in one mid-sized Midwestern U.S. city. We use bipartite network analysis to examine the connection between organization type and the production of types of civic information. We highlight the many ways that local organizations collaboratively promote the civic capacity of local residents, but meanwhile they also produce non-civic information, potentially to adapt to the platform for more public attention.

YINGYING CHEN and CINDY YU CHEN (PhD student)

Citation: Yuan, S., Chen, Y., Vojta, S., & Chen, CY. (2022). More aggressive, more retweets? Exploring the effects of aggressive climate change messages on Twitter. Paper presented at the 72nd Annual International Communications Association Conference, Paris, France.

Abstract: When an increasing amount of polarized and aggressive tweets of climate change are observed, limited is known as how they spread on Twitter. This study focuses on how different types of network gatekeepers use aggressive styles and how the styles affect their propagation. The current study employed a computational method and identified 951 influential accounts from 7.25 million tweets about climate change in 2019 and 2020. We analyzed their use of aggression and politicized cues, and the relationship with the volume of retweets. Results showed that even though aggressive tweets were a small portion of their overall tweets about climate change, aggressive tweets were more likely to be politicized and retweeted. Additionally, different types of accounts (e.g., news media, political elites, individuals) would use aggression differently. The findings of this study build on the current knowledge in the use of aggression online and provide practical implications for environmental communicators. 

JABARI EVANS

I presented a paper in progress for the African American Communication and Culture Division at the annual Meeting of the National Communication Association in Seattle, Washington.

Citation: Evans, J.M. (2021). Clout(chasers): Relational Labor and Empowerment Strategies of Black Youth in Chicago’s DIY Rap Scene. Working paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the National Communication Association. Seattle, WA. November 18.

I see “clout chasing” as a techno-social competition in the marketplace of attention. For Black youth, clout chasing is self-expression that involves creatively asserting one’s presence in digital spaces that were not designed with them in mind. As a phenomenon, clout-chasing is built around youth sharing their everyday lives online in hopes of creating an engaging reputation within social media platforms. I use Clout-chasing as a framework to understand how Black youth use "underground" labor practices in the innovation economy to expose their creative talents.

ROBERT MCKEEVER

Citation: Holman L. & McKeever, R. (2022, May). Climate Change Storytelling: The Transportation Effect of Vividness and Exemplification in Video Narratives on Perceptions of Risk, Attitudes and Intended Behaviors. Paper accepted for presentation at the 72nd Annual International Communication Association (ICA) Conference, Paris, France

KIM THOMPSON

This presentation highlights recently collected data by Paul, Yadamsuren, and Thompson exploring ways COVID work-from-home restrictions have affect digital inclusion, digital tech adoption, digital use, and digital confidence.

Citation: Paul, A., Yadamsuren, B. & Thompson, K. M. (2021). Using Factors for Digital Inclusion to Assess Changes in Digital Use Behavior During COVID Times. Presented at the 8th PAN IIM World Management Conference: Responsible Business for Sustainable Development. 16-18 December, 2021 at Indian Institute of Management--Kozhikode, India.

Abstract: During this sudden dramatic transformation owing to the pandemic normal lives were disrupted and personal spaces merged in new ways with the professional. Considerable attention has been drawn to the need for understanding in what ways the pandemic has affected the use of digital media in everyday lives of people. Literature highlights the COVID-19 home in context of the digitized work arrangements and the need to look at unequal burdens of household work along with issues of digital access including Wi-Fi. Businesses are also reshaping their work practices in new ways after experiencing remote work during the pandemic. The purpose of our study is to explore the impact of COVID-19 in everyday lives of working professionals in India applying a digital inclusion framework (Thompson & Paul, 2020) using an online survey method. The findings of our study can help in understanding the new normal with respect to digital use in the lives of individuals owing to the pandemic that will be of interest to governments and organizations to formulate policies towards effective digital inclusion for citizens and better work productivity by employees during stressful times.


JOURNAL ARTICLES

SHANNON BOWEN and YICHING ZHU (SJMC doctoral graduate)

Citation: Yicheng Zhu, Shannon A. Bowen & Xiangming Lyu (2022): Messenger Nationality, Media Skepticism, and Crisis Communication Effectiveness: Huawei’s YouTube Messages as Perceived in the U.S., International Journal of Strategic Communication, DOI: 10.1080/1553118X.2021.2014499

Abstract: This study examines the effect of messenger nationality on the credibility perception of YouTube sources in the theoretical context of situational crisis communication theory (SCCT). An online survey experiment with a quota U.S. voter sample (N = 354) showed that Russian nationality decreases source credibility perception in comparison to U.K. and control conditions, while the latter two showed no differences. Although skepticism in domestic media dampens such an effect, path analyses also showed that such impact can be extended to the effectiveness of an MNC’s (i.e., Huawei) global crisis communication efforts in the U.S. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed.

Link: https://doi.org/10.1080/1553118X.2021.2014499 

YINGYING CHEN

Citation: Chen, Y., & Wang, L. (2022). Misleading political advertising fuels incivility online: A social network analysis of 2020 US presidential election campaign video comments on YouTube. Computers in Human Behavior, 107202.https://doi.org/10.1016/j.chb.2022.107202

Abstract: In the 2020 U.S. presidential election, increasing misinformation-based political advertisements have circulated on video-sharing platforms, such as YouTube and challenged healthy political communication. This study investigates the social contagion of political incivility stemming from a misinformation-based campaign video posted by former U.S. President Donald Trump. Specifically, using dynamic network analysis and exponential random graph modeling, we explore and test three mechanisms (imitation, intergroup interaction, and reciprocity) for their role in the contagion of online political incivility. Contrary to previous findings, we show that online political incivility is not a fleeting occurrence but recurrent and sustaining given YouTube's promotional algorithms. Reciprocity is the primary mechanism that predicts the formation of uncivil politically-based interactions in YouTube comments. The findings provide implications for YouTube's content moderation mechanism and underline the need to reconsider the potential harm of promoting misinformation-based political campaigns through this platform.

Link: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.chb.2022.107202

YINGYING CHEN

Citation: Chen, Y., Thorson, K., & Lavaccare, J. (2022). Convergence and Divergence: The Evolution of Climate Change Frames Within and Across Public Events. International Journal of Communication, 16, 23.

Abstract: The framing of climate change in the news over time plays a crucial role in shaping public understanding of the issue. This study examines variation in the framing of climate change in global news media across 12 high-attention climate events from 2012 to 2015. We show that events and journalistic practice interact to generate a mix of frames that collectively construct climate change discourse. Using topic modeling and network analysis, we identified six frames used in the media coverage of climate during this period. We trace the usage of these frames and show that framings related to policy struggles and economic concerns have become the “default” framing of climate change across news media. Other framings of the climate issue appear only when particular public events happen. The findings suggest that frame evolution is a socially constructed process influenced by journalistic routines and triggering events.

Link: https://ijoc.org/index.php/ijoc/article/viewFile/17609/3629

CANDICE EDRINGTON

Social movements are similar to public relations campaigns in that building and maintaining mutually beneficial relationships are vital for their success. This article analyzes the website homepage of the Black Lives Matter movement to assess how they build relationships with their publics.

Citation: Edrington, C. (2021). Information, identification, or both? A rhetorical analysis of how BLM uses their official website. The Pennsylvania Communication Annual, 77(2), 11-30.

Abstract: The purpose of this analysis is to examine the rhetorical dimension of Black Lives Matter’s website homepage in an effort to uncover how identification is articulated in and through the website. This rhetorical analysis focuses on the larger issues of how social movements use digital tools to help advance their goals and achieve action.

JUNGMI JUN, JUN J. ZHANG (PhD alumna), ALI ZAIN (PhD student), and EHSAN MOHAMMADI (iSchool faculty)

Social media discourse of the FDA’s MRTP authorization of IQOS. Substance Use and Misuse.

Citation: Jun, J., Zhang, N., Zhane, A., & Mohammadi, E. (2022).

Abstract: Background: The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) authorized the marketing of the IQOS tobacco heating system as a modified risk tobacco product (MRTP) in July 2020, permitting its ‘reduced exposure’ marketing. This decision is accompanied by much controversy among the global health community. We provide a preliminary analysis of Twitter conversations regarding the MRTP authorization of IQOS by identifying the authors, valence towards the policy decision, source of cited link, and focused topic. Methods: We analyzed 548 tweets mentioning MRTP posted between July 2016 (when PMI submitted the proposal) and October 2020. Results: We found a higher proportion of pro-MRTP valence (25.4%) than anti-MRTP (16.2%). Nearly half of the tweets (47.2%) expressing personal opinions presented pro-MRTP valence (vs. anti-MRTP = 23.9%). The FDA website was more frequently cited in pro-MRTP tweets (30.8% vs. anti = 4.8%), while tobacco control advocates’ websites were cited only in anti-MRTP tweets (77.4% vs. pro = 0). Pro-MRTP valence appeared more frequently in tweets mentioning health (53.1% vs. anti =38.5%) and cessation (100% vs. anti = 0). Nearly 42% of tweets showed a bot score greater than .43, indicating a possibility of automation. Conclusion: Continuous efforts are needed to surveil the industry’s attempts to create a climate of false consensus and circulate misinformation regarding MRTP on social media, as well as to assist non-scientific audiences’ understanding of MRTP.

Link: https://www.tandfonline.com/eprint/UXNVNZVCQXUDCGENFA5M/full?target=10.1080/10826084.2021.2019777

AMIR KARAMI, PARISA BOZORGI (Arnold School of Public Health), DWAYNE E. PORTER (Arnold School of Public Health) and JAN M. EBERTH (Arnold School of Public Health)

This study published by Drug and Alcohol Dependence (Impact Factor: 4.492) aims to identify the leading neighborhood-level predictors of drug overdose and develop a model to predict areas at the highest risk of drug overdose using geographic information systems and machine learning (ML) techniques.

Citation: Bozorgi, P., Porter, D. E., Eberth, J. M., Eidson, J. P., & Karami, A. (2021). The leading neighborhood-level predictors of drug overdose: a mixed machine learning and spatial approach. Drug and alcohol dependence, 109143.

Abstract:

Background: Drug overdose is a leading cause of unintentional death in the United States and has contributed significantly to a decline in life expectancy during recent years. To combat this health issue, this study aims to identify the leading neighborhood-level predictors of drug overdose and develop a model to predict areas at the highest risk of drug overdose using geographic information systems and machine learning (ML) techniques.

Method: Neighborhood-level (block group) predictors were grouped into three domains: socio-demographic factors, drug use variables, and protective resources. We explored different ML algorithms, accounting for spatial dependency, to identify leading predictors in each domain. Using geographically weighted regression and the best-performing ML algorithm, we combined the output prediction of three domains to produce a final ensemble model. The model performance was validated using classification evaluation metrics, spatial cross-validation, and spatial autocorrelation testing.

Results: The variables contributing most to the predictive model included the proportion of households with food stamps, households with an annual income below $35,000, opioid prescription rate, smoking accessories expenditures, and accessibility to opioid treatment programs and hospitals. Compared to the error estimated from normal cross-validation, the generalized error of the model did not increase considerably in spatial cross-validation. The ensemble model using ML outperformed the GWR method.

Conclusion: This study identified strong neighborhood-level predictors that place a community at risk of experiencing drug overdoses, as well as protective factors. Our findings may shed light on several specific avenues for targeted intervention in neighborhoods at risk for high drug overdose burdens.

Link: https://doi-org.pallas2.tcl.sc.edu/10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2021.109143

VANESSA KITZIE

Citation: Kitzie, V., Connaway, L.S., & Radford, M.L. (2021). “I’ve already Googled it and I can’t understand it”: User’s perceptions of virtual reference and social question-answering sites. Reference and User Services Quarterly, 59(3/4), 204-215.

Abstract: For librarians to continually demonstrate superior and high-quality service, they must meet the needs of current and potential users. One way that librarians have met the needs of users is by expanding their service offerings online via virtual reference services (VRS). This expansion is particularly critical in the current time of COVID-19. To provide high-quality VRS service, librarians can learn from social question-answering (SQA) sites, whose popularity reflect changing user expectations, motivations, use, and assessment of information. Informed by interviews with 51 users and potential users of both platforms this research examines how strengths from SQA can be leveraged in VRS, and what can be learned from SQA practices to reach potential library users. This study represents one of the few comparisons between VRS and SQA that exist in the literature.

Link: https://journals.ala.org/index.php/rusq/article/view/7721

KIRSTIN PELLIZZARO

By measuring the psychological distance to COVID-19, either as a health or economic risk to one's self, we were able to explain why people accept rumored messages to be true. Implications for misinformation and rumor psychology research are discussed.

Citation: Kwon KH, Pellizzaro K, Shao C, Chadha M. “I Heard That COVID-19 Was...”: Rumors, Pandemic, and Psychological Distance. American Behavioral Scientist. January 2022. doi:10.1177/00027642211066026

Abstract: The spread of misinformation through a variety of communication channels has amplified society’s challenge to manage the COVID-19 pandemic. While existing studies have examined how misinformation spreads, few studies have examined the role of psychological distance in people’s mental processing of a rumor and their propensity to accept self-transformed narratives of the message. Based on an open-ended survey data collected in the U.S. (N = 621) during an early phase of the pandemic, the current study examines how psychological distance relates to the transformation and acceptance of conspiratorial narratives in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic. Two instances of misinformation are examined, both of which were widely heard at the time of data collection: the role of (a) Bill Gates and (b) government during the outbreak of the pandemic. This study uses topic modeling techniques to capture distinctive topical attributes that emerged from rumor narratives. In addition, statistical analyses estimate the psychological distance effects on the salience of topical attributes of a rumor story and an individual’s propensity to believe them. Findings reveal that psychological distance to the threats of COVID-19 influences how misinformation evolves through word-of-mouth, particularly in terms of who is responsible for the pandemic and why the world finds itself in the current situation. Psychological distance also explains why people accept the message to be true. Implications for misinformation and rumor psychology research, as well as avenues for future research, are discussed.

Link: https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/00027642211066026?fbclid=IwAR1wJI1z38zq6dpo2jnyaoLY_IJdZF6qx2VOHeBv1zhAiJr_M-3k5bWeb1w

TOM REICHERT

Accepted for publication in the International Journal of Advertising.

Citation: Choi, Hojoon, Kyunga Yoo, Tom Reichert, and Temple Northup (forthcoming). Sexual Ad Appeals in Social Media: Effects and Influences of Cultural Difference and Sexual Self-Schema. International Journal of Advertising.

LINWAN WU

Commenting on Brand Posts during a Crisis: The Relationship between Context-Induced Moods and Brand Message Processing across Three Social Media Platforms

Citation: Feng, Y., & Wu, L. (2021). Commenting on brand posts during a crisis: The relationship between context-induced moods and brand message processing. Journal of Interactive Advertising. DOI: 10.1080/15252019.2021.1994060

Abstract: Within the context of COVID-19, this study examines the relationship between context-induced moods and consumers’ responses to two different types of brand posts on social media: profit-driven posts and public-driven posts. Using both social media data (24,578 user comments on 14 brand posts on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter) and survey data (356 subjects recruited from Amazon.com’s Mechanical Turk), we found that across all three social media platforms (i.e., Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter), the more negative mood one was in when using a social media platform during the pandemic, the more likely one would leave a comment to praise the company endorser of the public-driven post (comment type 5) as opposed to leaving a comment to discuss serious issues, shedding light on the prediction of negative-state relief model. By contrast, across all three social media platforms, there is no relationship between context-induced moods and types of comments people leave on a profit-driven brand post. We provide theoretical, practical, and methodological implications for future research.

Link: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/15252019.2021.1994060 


PANELS/PRESENTATIONS

LINWAN WU

How the public and consumers respond to AI’s involvement in advertising.

Invited virtual presentation at the Fourth Annual International Conference on Intelligence Science and Advertising Development, Shanghai International Studies University.

Citation: Wu, L. (November 2021). How the public and consumers respond to AI’s involvement in advertising. Invited presentation at the Fourth Annual International Conference on Intelligence Science and Advertising Development, Shanghai International Studies University. Online.


BOOK CHAPTER

KIM THOMPSON and CLAYTON A. COPELAND

Equity, diversity, and inclusion in the LIS education and practice sectors: Creating accessible learning environments and informing social justice through universal design. In B. Mehra (Ed.), Social Justice Design and Implementation in Library and Information Science. Routledge.

Citation: Copeland, C. A. & Thompson, K. M. (2022). Equity, diversity, and inclusion in the LIS education and practice sectors: Creating accessible learning environments and informing social justice through universal design. In B. Mehra (Ed.), Social Justice Design and Implementation in Library and Information Science (pp. 190-201). Routledge.

Abstract: Social justice concepts can play a pivotal, transformational role in Library and Information Science (LIS) education and practice. Universal design – or design focused on meeting the needs of everyone, regardless of variabilities -- is one framework that can enhance the experience for all. This chapter provides a pedagogical approach to inclusion and accessibility in the LIS sector, providing practical examples of approaches to social justice in course design and delivery through a focus on physical equity, intellectual diversity, and social inclusion. This pedagogical model draws upon the core principles of Universal Design for Learning, and will not only ensure that more students in our programs can be successful in the learning environment, but also that the integration and modeling of these principles for course design throughout the curriculum ultimately can have pervasive social impacts and resultant community involvement in LIS practice, research, education, policy development, service design, and program implementation.


OTHER

KEVIN HULL

Kevin has been named to the editorial board of the International Journal of Sport Communication.

AMIR KARAMI

Dr. Karami was selected as the editor for the Open-Access Special Issue "Applications of Social Media Analytics for Health Informatics" for Healthcare (IF:2.645 & Indexed in PubMed). The first review would be done in less than one month. While the due date is Aug 1, 2022, Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted).

Link: https://www.mdpi.com/journal/healthcare/special_issues/social_media_analytics

2021

AWARDS AND GRANTS

VANESSA KITZIE

An article I co-wrote with colleagues from the University of Kentucky and Rutgers titled, “Drag Queen Storytimes: Public Library Staff Perceptions and Experiences” (Children and Libraries, Summer 2021) has been nominated for the ALA Oboler Award.

Link: https://www.ala.org/rt/ifrt/oboler

BRETT ROBERTSON

Winner of the 2021 National Communication (NCA) Communication and Aging Division Outstanding Dissertation Award


CONFERENCE PAPER

JABARI EVANS

I presented a paper in progress for the African American Communication and Culture Division at the annual Meeting of the National Communication Association in Seattle, Washington. I see “clout chasing” as a techno-social competition in the marketplace of attention. For Black youth, clout chasing is self-expression that involves creatively asserting one’s presence in digital spaces that were not designed with them in mind. As a phenomenon, clout-chasing is built around youth sharing their everyday lives online in hopes of creating an engaging reputation within social media platforms. I use Clout-chasing as a framework to understand how Black youth use "underground" labor practices in the innovation economy to expose their creative talents.

Citation: Evans, J.M. (2021). Clout(chasers): Relational Labor and Empowerment Strategies of Black Youth in Chicago’s Drill Rap Scene. Working paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the National Communication Association. Seattle, WA. November 18.


JOURNAL ARTICLES

CANDICE EDRINGTON

Social movements are similar to public relations campaigns in that building and maintaining mutually beneficial relationships are vital for their success. This article analyzes the website homepage of the Black Lives Matter movement to assess how they build relationships with their publics.

Citation: Edrington, C. (2021). Information, identification, or both? A rhetorical analysis of how BLM uses their official website. The Pennsylvania Communication Annual, 77(2), 11-30.

Abstract: The purpose of this analysis is to examine the rhetorical dimension of Black Lives Matter’s website homepage in an effort to uncover how identification is articulated in and through the website. This rhetorical analysis focuses on the larger issues of how social movements use digital tools to help advance their goals and achieve action. 

JUNGMI JUN, JOON KYOUNG KIM (PhD alumni), BONGKI WOO (School of Social Work)

Citation: Jun, J., Kim, J., Woo, B., (2021). Fight the virus and fight the bias: Asian Americans’ engagement in activism to combat Anti-Asian COVID-19 racism. Race and Justice. DOI: 10.1177/21533687211054165

Abstract: The global COVID-19 pandemic reinforced anti-Asian biases, accompanied by the rise of violence against Asians. We examined Asian Americans’ engagement in activism to combat anti-Asian racism and advance their community using the situational theory of problem solving (STOPS) and two additional factors—past discrimination and subjective norms. Asian American activism includes social media, political, and advocacy actions. Structural equation modeling was conducted with data from online survey responses of 240 Asian Americans. Our results suggest pathways from Asian Americans’ past racism experiences to political and advocacy actions via three perceptual factors in STOPS (problem, involvement, constraint recognition), subjective norms, and expression of opinion on social media.

AMIR KARAMI, PARISA BOZORGI (Arnold School of Public Health), DWAYNE E. PORTER (Arnold School of Public Health), and JAN M. EBERTH (Arnold School of Public Health)

This study published by Drug and Alcohol Dependence (Impact Factor: 4.492) aims to identify the leading neighborhood-level predictors of drug overdose and develop a model to predict areas at the highest risk of drug overdose using geographic information systems and machine learning (ML) techniques.

Citation: Bozorgi, P., Porter, D. E., Eberth, J. M., Eidson, J. P., & Karami, A. (2021). The leading neighborhood-level predictors of drug overdose: a mixed machine learning and spatial approach. Drug and Alcohol Dependence, 109143.

Abstract: Background: Drug overdose is a leading cause of unintentional death in the United States and has contributed significantly to a decline in life expectancy during recent years. To combat this health issue, this study aims to identify the leading neighborhood-level predictors of drug overdose and develop a model to predict areas at the highest risk of drug overdose using geographic information systems and machine learning (ML) techniques. Method: Neighborhood-level (block group) predictors were grouped into three domains: socio-demographic factors, drug use variables, and protective resources. We explored different ML algorithms, accounting for spatial dependency, to identify leading predictors in each domain. Using geographically weighted regression and the best-performing ML algorithm, we combined the output prediction of three domains to produce a final ensemble model. The model performance was validated using classification evaluation metrics, spatial cross-validation, and spatial autocorrelation testing. Results: The variables contributing most to the predictive model included the proportion of households with food stamps, households with an annual income below $35,000, opioid prescription rate, smoking accessories expenditures, and accessibility to opioid treatment programs and hospitals. Compared to the error estimated from normal cross-validation, the generalized error of the model did not increase considerably in spatial cross-validation. The ensemble model using ML outperformed the GWR method. Conclusion: This study identified strong neighborhood-level predictors that place a community at risk of experiencing drug overdoses, as well as protective factors. Our findings may shed light on several specific avenues for targeted intervention in neighborhoods at risk for high drug overdose burdens.

Link: https://www-sciencedirect-com.pallas2.tcl.sc.edu/science/article/pii/S0376871621006384?via%3Dihub

KIRSTIN PELLIZZARO

My study, "Reporting from My Home: Location Effect on the Para-Social Phenomenon and the News Broadcast Industry" was published in the Journal of Broadcasting & Electronic Media online (issue forthcoming). This paper was presented at the 2021 Broadcast Education Association Virtual Conference and won First Place Paper in the News Division. The pandemic created a unique opportunity to study a possible change in audience effect depending on whether the news anchor was working from home or the studio. The findings lead to a discussion of potential new cost-saving broadcasting structures, and more importantly, work-life measures.

Citation: Pellizzaro, K. & Liseblad, M. (2021, Nov 11). Reporting From my home: Location effect on the para-social phenomenon and the news broadcast industry. Journal of Broadcasting & Electronic Media. https://doi.org/10.1080/08838151.2021.1993226

Abstract: The current pandemic has created a unique opportunity to study news broadcasting in different formats as many broadcasters report from home versus the studio. Using the well-established Para-Social phenomenon, this research attempts to determine a change in audience effect depending on whether the news anchor is working from home or the studio. Using a between-group experiment, the study examines Para-Social Interaction and Para-Social Relationship in a single viewing event. Further, the study tests Para-Social Interaction and Para-Social Relationship in an extended viewing experience. The findings lead to a discussion of possible new cost-saving broadcasting structures and work-life measures.

Link: https://bit.ly/3c8l0jw

TOM REICHERT

Accepted for publication in the International Journal of Advertising.

Citation: Choi, Hojoon, Kyunga Yoo, Tom Reichert, and Temple Northup (forthcoming). Sexual Ad Appeals in Social Media: Effects and Influences of Cultural Difference and Sexual Self-Schema. International Journal of Advertising.

TRAVIS WAGNER (iSchool PhD student), VANESSA KITZIE, and VAL LOOKINGBILL (iSchool PhD student)

Citation: Wagner, T.L., Kitzie, V., & Lookingbill, V. (2021). Transgender and non-binary individuals and ICT-driven information practices in response to trans-exclusionary healthcare systems: A qualitative study [Special focus issue, “Informatics for Sex- and Gender-Related Health: Understanding the problems, developing new methods, and designing new solutions”]. Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association (JAMIA), Eds. M.R. Boland, N. Elhadad, & W. Pratt.

Abstract: Objective: This qualitative research examines how transgender and gender nonbinary (T/GNB) persons from South Carolina navigate informational barriers within healthcare systems. This navigation can be described through the lens of information practices, or how T/GNB participants create, seek, use, and share information to achieve desired healthcare outcomes. Special focus is given to the roles of Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) in shaping these practices. Materials and Methods: The research utilizes participant data from semistructured interviews and focus groups conducted with 26 T/GNB individuals focusing on their health information practices. Data analysis utilized emic/etic coding and the constant comparative method to identify themes describing transexclusionary information barriers and respondent ICT-led information practices. Results: Findings note healthcare systems producing cisnormativity by design resulting in T/GNB individuals viewing healthcare spaces as exclusionary. Exclusionary barriers included over reliance on medical, expert authority ignoring T/GNB embodiment, and a lack of contextual perspective to identities. In response, T/GNB seek, create, use, and share information via ICTs to challenge exclusionary practices. Discussion: T/GNB ICT use addresses systemic barriers within healthcare systems suggesting a need to reframe healthcare systems through the lens of design justice, one that values T/GNB agency in understanding and producing health knowledge. Conclusion: While many healthcare providers are not intentionally being transexclusionary, the design of healthcare information systems rely on cisnormative values, thus excluding many T/GNB from accessing healthcare in comfortable and safe ways. Shifting toward the values and practices of T/GNB as informed by ICT use will afford healthcare providers ways to undo barriers to care.

Link: https://academic.oup.com/jamia/advance-article-abstract/doi/10.1093/jamia/ocab234/6415463?redirectedFrom=fulltext

LINWAN WU

Citation: Feng, Y., & Wu, L. (2021). Commenting on brand posts during a crisis: The relationship between context-induced moods and brand message processing. Journal of Interactive Advertising. DOI: 10.1080/15252019.2021.1994060

Abstract: Within the context of COVID-19, this study examines the relationship between context-induced moods and consumers’ responses to two different types of brand posts on social media: profit-driven posts and public-driven posts. Using both social media data (24,578 user comments on 14 brand posts on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter) and survey data (356 subjects recruited from Amazon.com’s Mechanical Turk), we found that across all three social media platforms (i.e., Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter), the more negative mood one was in when using a social media platform during the pandemic, the more likely one would leave a comment to praise the company endorser of the public-driven post (comment type 5) as opposed to leaving a comment to discuss serious issues, shedding light on the prediction of negative-state relief model. By contrast, across all three social media platforms, there is no relationship between context-induced moods and types of comments people leave on a profit-driven brand post. We provide theoretical, practical, and methodological implications for future research.

Link: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/15252019.2021.1994060


PRESENTATIONS AND SPEAKING ENGAGEMENTS

CLAYTON COPELAND

Citation: Copeland, C.A. (2021, October 28th). Bringing IDEAS – Inclusion, Diversity, Equity and Accessibility Solutions – to your Library [Keynote Address]. International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions. Joint Virtual Conference. https://www.ifla.org/events/managing-and-marketing-inclusion-in-libraries/

JUNGMI JUN

Was invited to speak at the Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Week of the US Veterans Health Care System and facilitated a session on 'Anti-Asian COVID-19 biases/racism and Asians' communicative coping and activism' for employees of the Veterans Affairs Hospitals in South Carolina, Georgia, and Alabama.

LINWAN WU

Invited virtual presentation at the Fourth Annual International Conference on Intelligence Science and Advertising Development, Shanghai International Studies University.

Citation: Wu, L. (November 2021). How the public and consumers respond to AI’s involvement in advertising. Invited presentation at the Fourth Annual International Conference on Intelligence Science and Advertising Development, Shanghai International Studies University. Online.

AWARDS & GRANTS

SHANNON BOWEN and AMIT SHETH

NSF Award #2137806. We are creating an AI to identify misinformation during crisis situations such as a hurricane.

Citation: NSF Convergence Accelerator Track F: Actionable Sensemaking Tools for Curating and Authenticating Information in the Presence of Misinformation during Crises

Abstract: High volume, rapidly changing, diverse information, which often includes misinformation, can easily overwhelm decision makers during a crisis. Decisions made both during and long after a crisis, affect the trust between responsible decision makers and citizens (many from vulnerable populations), who are impacted by those decisions. This project seeks to help decision makers manage information, promoting reliance on authentic knowledge production processes while also reducing the impact of intentional disinformation and unintended misinformation. The project team will develop a suite of prototype tools that bring timely, high-quality integrated content to bear on decision making and governance, as a routine part of operations, and especially during a crisis. Integrated and authenticated content comprising scientific facts and technical information coupled with citizen and stakeholder viewpoints assure the accuracy of safety decisions and the appropriate prioritization of relief efforts. The project team will synthesize convergent expertise across multiple disciplines; engage and build stakeholder communities through partnerships with government and industry to guide tool development; build a prototype tool for authenticating data and managing misinformation; and validate the tool using real world crisis scenarios. The project team will create use-inspired personalized AI-driven sensemaking prototype tools for decision-makers to comprehend and authenticate dynamic, uncertain, and often contradictory information to facilitate effective decisions during crises. The tools will focus on curation while accounting for source and explainable content credibility. Guidance from community stakeholders obtained using ethnographic methods will ensure that the resulting tools are practical, timely, and relevant for informed decision making. These tools will capitalize on features of the information environment, human cognitive abilities and limitations, and algorithmic approaches to managing information. In particular, content and network analyses can reveal constellations of sources with a higher probability of producing credible information, while knowledge graphs can help surface and organize important materials being shared while facilitating explainability. The project team will also design and develop a microworld environment to examine and improve tool robustness while simultaneously helping to train decision makers in real-world settings such as school districts and public health settings. This project represents a convergence of disciplines spanning expertise in computer science, social sciences, linguistics, network science, public health, cognitive science, operations, and communication that are necessary to achieve its goals. Partnerships between communities, government industry, and academia will ensure the deliverables are responsive to stakeholder needs. This award reflects NSF's statutory mission and has been deemed worthy of support through evaluation using the Foundation's intellectual merit and broader impacts review criteria.

BRETT ROBERTSON

Grant from the Waterhouse Family Institute

Abstract: The COVID-19 pandemic destabilized and disrupted communities across the United States, underscoring the vulnerability of existing social structures like housing, medical, financial, and social safety net systems to exogenous shocks like pandemics, natural disasters, economic crises, and the like. Community-based, mutual aid responses to the COVID-19 crisis received national media attention, especially in the early stages of stay-at-home orders. As 3,000 New York City restaurant workers organized to raise $25,000 and distributed the funds as weekly stipends to other out-of-work restaurant employees during the early days of the stay-at-home orders, or librarians worked together to feed food insecure children in their communities, mutual aid systems and organizations (MAOs) underscored how existing inequities were exacerbated by the COVID-19 pandemic, much like how Hurricane Katrina, for example, highlighted deep inequities in U.S. housing policies for marginalized communities. The increased recognition that MAOs play a vital role when economic and political systems fail certain populations highlights a need to examine how both centering marginalized voices (e.g., women, BIPOC) and transforming economic systems can create more equitable economic realities for those historically left out of traditional, neoliberal economies. This project examines the role that mutual aid organizations (MAOs) play in disrupting traditional, neoliberal economic systems through communication processes, and explores how mutual aid organizations constitute equitable economic systems for communities in need. Using a multi-phase approach, we collaborate with four MAOs in our own communities (two based in the Midwest, two based in the Southeast). Following a needs-assessment approach, we conduct semi-structured interviews with key MAO volunteers and social media managers to ask how MAOs work to build equitable economic systems in their communities, how crises have marred efforts for equity, and how communication enables (or constrains) resilience processes within and outside their organization. We also implement photo-elicitation interview questions to capture social media posts and image-based data to better understand volunteers’ experiences organizing on-and offline. 


CONFERENCE PAPER

JABARI EVANS

Citation: Evans, J.M.(2021, October). The Anatomy of Digital Clout(chasing): Black Aesthetics, Online Visibility and Relational Labor Among DIY Hip-Hop Musicians on Chicago’s South Side. Paper presented at AoIR 2021: The 22nd Annual Conference of the Association of Internet Researchers. Philadelphia, PA, USA: AoIR. Retrieved from http://spir.aoir.org.

Abstract: Prior literature has suggested that it is through popular music that the social, professional and technological aspirations of Black youth often come together. Nowhere is this more evident than in the context of Hip-Hop music, where Black youth inventiveness with digital tools is celebrated and valued far more than any other genre of media entertainment. Though many scholars have theorized on the centrality of authenticity and masculinity to the communication of Hip-Hop artists in digital spaces, academic work has paid very little attention to artist perspectives of how this relational labor and visibility strategy helps them cultivate viable careers as influencers. Using interviews with artists, artist managers and independent label executives, I detail the career potentials for Hip-Hop artists engaging in social media self-branding strategies. I explore the content and character of their work on social media toward acquiring “clout”- a digital form of influence rooted in Hip-Hop that allows marginalized youth to leverage digital tools in build social status, maintain authenticity, cultivate connections with fans, connect to friends and other cultural producers. In this study, I detail examples of three relational strategies that our respondents utilized to acquire “digital clout:” a) Corralling b) Capping and, c) Co-Signing. To conclude, I argue Chicago’s Hip-Hop scene provides an example of why formal institutions need to rethink how race, class, gender and geography influence the digital practices of young people and how their practices add significantly to the understanding of the cultural and communicative diversity arising from globalizing social media.

More information: Previous work has focused exclusively on how youth in the Chicago Drill music scene used their songs to perform “Internet Banging” by threatening rival gang members, confirming their whereabouts and planning criminal acts. Because of this work, the City of Chicago’s police force not only created a task force dedicated to surveillance of Drillers on social media but affectively banned popular artists like Lil Durk and Chief Keef from performing in their hometown. (Sociologist Geoff Harkness wrote a book detailing how the hip-hop scene in Chicago was split between college educated “backpackers” from the affluent neighborhoods and “gangsta rappers” from low income communities of color and the prejudice faced by those performers in the gangsta rap community.) Additionally, media outlets like Chicago Tribune, Chicago Sun Times, The Fader, Pitchfork, Complex Magazine and WorldStar Hip Hop all widely covered the rise of both Chief Keef and the Drill scene pretty extensively; also focused on the violent nature and highlighting gang affiliation of these youths as the culprit for their viral appeal. Even so, scholars such as myself have begun to look at Drill retrospectively as being a case for seeing how digital disadvantage and racial stereotyping plays out in the attention economy. In my forthcoming book project with Lexington Books, I speak about how many of the actors in the drill scene were some of the first musicians to understand the power of social media marketing and the “always on” nature of platforms like YouTube, Twitter and Instagram. My interviews with those affiliated with artists like King Louie, G Herbo and Chief Keef have shown me that the gang violence associated with Drill is hardly the reason these artists found success in the attention economy and this paper identifies three primary strategies they employ to "defeat" the internet. Link: https://youtu.be/9mZgsMeBnrk


JOURNAL ARTICLES

SHANNON BOWEN

Citation: Neill, M. S. & Bowen, S. A. (2021). Employee perceptions of ethical listening in U.S. organizations. Public Relations Review, 47, 1-8. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pubrev.2021.102123

Abstract: Through a national online survey with 300 U.S. employees, this study revealed that nonmanagers and women are not satisfied with their organization’s listening efforts. Using the lens of employee-organization relationship theory, problematic issues were identified related to transparency, communication climate, and employee silence. Some of the barriers to effective listening were limited ability to share insights from listening with supervisors and other employees, poor or absent training for collecting and analyzing intelligence that can be gained from listening, and employees who were unwilling to speak up due to perceptions that management was not sincerely interested in what they have to say. Implications for theory and practice are discussed.

Link: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0363811121001168?dgcid=coauthor

LUCY SATNOS GREEN, MELISSA P. JOHNSTON (University of West Georgia)

My latest research article, "A contextualization of editorial misconduct in the library and information science academic information ecosystem," was recently published in the Journal of the Association for Information Science and Technology (JASIS&T). This study investigated how these unethical practices, specifically those coded as editorial misconduct, bring the authenticity and integrity of the library and information science academic research digital record into question.

Citation: Green, L. S., & Johnston, M. P. (2021). A contextualization of editorial misconduct in the library and information science academic information ecosystem. Journal of the Association for Information Science and Technology, 1– 16. https://doi.org/10.1002/asi.24593

Abstract: In the last decade, one of the most effective tools applied in combating the erosion of public trust in academic research has been an increased level of transparency in the peer review and editorial process. Publicly available publication ethics guidelines and policies are vital in creating a transparent process that prevents unethical research, publication misconduct, manipulation of the communication of research to practitioners, and the erosion of public trust. This study investigated how these unethical practices, specifically those coded as editorial misconduct, bring the authenticity and integrity of the library and information science academic research digital record into question. Employing a multi-layered approach, including key informant interviews, researchers determined the frequency and the content of ethical publishing policies and procedures in library and information science journals; exploring the ways the lack of, or nonadherence to these policies and procedures impacted library and information science researchers in instances of editorial misconduct.

Link: https://asistdl.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1002/asi.24593

VANESSA KITZIE, TRAVIS WAGNER, VAL LOOKINGBILL, NICK VERA (iSchool Ph.D. students)

Citation: Kitzie, V., Wagner, T.L, Lookingbill, V., & Vera, A.N. (2021). Advancing information practices theoretical discourses centered on marginality, community, and embodiment: Learning from the experiences of LGBTQIA+ communities [Special issue, “Information Behaviour & Information Practices Theory”]. Journal of the Association for Information Science & Technology (JASIS&T), Eds. R. Willson, D. Allen, H. Julien, G. Burnett.

Abstract: This conceptual paper identifies future directions for information practices theoretical discourses addressing marginality, community, and embodiment. We extend arguments from critical research identifying how existing discourses fail to capture the nuanced, lived experiences of people and communities confronting marginalization, predominantly via their reinforcement of deficit narratives. We then connect a series of qualitative projects examining the information practices of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, intersex, and asexual communities in the American South with relevant Library and Information Science (LIS) research to examine how marginality, community, and embodiment shape these practices. Specifically, we introduce a conceptual model that describes marginality by framing information practices as tactical and agentic responses to and refutations of social and structural barriers and risks. While some of the information practices of participants and communities appear to be uninformed or unsafe, they represent the products of community sharing and vetting. Embodied navigations further inform participant practices as they navigate information worlds produced and informed by their intersectional identities. These arguments coincide with key categories established within our model that describe information practices: defensive and protective, and community and self. Based on these insights, we offer directions for future research and theory to reorient existing discourses in ways that inspire middle-range theory building that fully captures people's lived experiences.

Link: https://asistdl.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/asi.24594

JACOB LONG

This a peer-reviewed academic journal article titled, "Improving the replicability and generalizability of inferences in quantitative communication research" that was just published in the journal Annals of the International Communication Association. I am the sole author. This article argues that researchers of communication should care about the so-called "replication crisis" affecting the social sciences and suggests a framework for evaluating research in that light. In particular, I argue that paying attention to generalizability can improve replication while also improving our research and scholarly communication. Although this is technically true of most academic research, this article is especially geared towards an audience of fellow researchers — it aims to help communication scientists plan and evaluate research better.

Citation: Long, J. A. (2021). Improving the replicability and generalizability of inferences in quantitative communication research. Annals of the International Communication Association, 45, 207–220. doi: 10.1080/23808985.2021.1979421

Abstract: This paper discusses the assessment of quality of quantitative communication research in light of the so-called ‘replicability crisis’ that has affected neighboring disciplines. For social scientific research, it is useful to think of research results as estimates which include error. I propose a framework suited to a variable field like communication, factoring in all sources of error, for assessing the quality of research. In communication research, greater consideration of generalizability is essential, which is at once both a higher standard than replicability but also a goal that should increase it. Furthermore, more explicit discussion of generalizability may help to further internationalize the discipline by clarifying the limitations of the large portion of research conducted within a narrow subset of world cultures.

Link: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/23808985.2021.1979421

LEIGH MOSCOWITZ and KELLI BOLING (SJMC Ph.D. alumna, now assistant professor at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln)

Much of the nation was gripped as we watched Christine Blasey Ford's testimony during Brett Kavanaugh's Supreme Court confirmation hearings in 2018. For many of us, this moment also felt déjà vu. This was the second time a well-respected academic had brought forth credible accusations of sexual assault against a Supreme Court Justice nominee, recalling the 1991 hearings involving Dr. Anita Hill and Clarence Thomas. While the two scenes were similar, the casts differed in terms of race, class, and age at the time of the assaults. Against the backdrop of the #MeToo movement, and the growing number of women and minorities elected to Congress, these two hearings also unfolded across different cultural and political contexts. We set out to explore the shifts in whose voices were represented and how these conversations happening in the media - specifically in Op-Eds published in The New York Times, The Washington Post, and The Wall Street Journal - made sense of these critical and controversial national events.

Citation: Boling, K. S. & Moscowitz, L. (2021). Truth, Justice, and Sexual Violence: A Comparative Analysis of Op-Eds Surrounding the Hill-Thomas and Ford-Kavanaugh Hearings. Journalism Studies. https://doi.org/10.1080/1461670X.2021.1991836

Abstract: Using discourse analysis to examine newspaper Op-Eds during the Hill-Thomas and Ford-Kavanaugh hearings, this study explores how media can function as an arbiter of public opinion during controversial events. This analysis highlights the importance of Op-Eds in defining whose voices matter in shaping national mediated discourses, examining the role media play in critical public debates surrounding issues of gender, race, power, and sexual violence. Against a backdrop of increasing numbers of women in the Senate chambers, the growing numbers of women and people of color across American newsrooms, and the impact of the #MeToo movement in the national conversation about sexual violence, this study examines changes in opinion authorship and media discourses surrounding these two hearings set 27 years apart. Findings show a shift in Op-Ed contributors, from mostly men in 1991 to predominantly women in 2018. Support for women and sexual assault accusers was largely absent in Op-Eds from 1991, replaced by vague debates about fairness and justice; while in 2018, Op-Ed authors offered tangible support for accusers. This study considers both the promise and limitations of these shifting media discourses to address structural and institutional power relations.

KIM THOMPSON

This editorial article brings together academics from the US, Canada and Australia to provide perspectives on the impacts of COVID-19 with relation to academic lifestyle, opportunities, and challenges.

Citation: Dali, K. Caidi, N., Thompson, K. M., & Garner, J. (2021). Tales from three countries and one academia: Academic faculty in the time of the pandemic. The Library Quarterly, 91(4), 371-384. https://www.journals.uchicago.edu/doi/10.1086/715923


PANELS & PRESENTATIONS

CANDICE EDRINGTON

I recently presented on a panel for PRSA's International Conference (October 6, 2021). Specifically, I discussed how the Black Lives Matter movement has become a catalyst for DEI conversations and initiatives beyond police brutality. This panel engaged with scholars, students, and industry professionals as well as provided best practice recommendations for the public relations industry. I explore the connection between social movements and strategic communication through a public relations lens. Specifically, I analyze how social movements use different media strategies and tactics to deliver their messages and with what consequence.

Abstract: This panel dives into some of the hottest DEI issues affecting PR professionals today. It addresses how: 1) Black Lives Matter activism, 2) the Supreme Court’s 2015 ruling on same-sex marriage rights, 3) and COVID-19 effects on employees’ mental health are all game-changers with wide-ranging implications for PR practice that communicators must manage. Panelists shared recommendations and engaged the audience through a rich Q&A discussion.

KAREN GAVIGAN and DANIELLA COOK (UofSC College of Education faculty)

Teaching the Civil Rights Movement through Primary Sources and Graphic Novels. American Association of School Librarians' 2021 National Conference - Salt Lake City, UT

LUCY SANTOS GREEN

I was invited to keynote the Universidade Estadual Paulista LIS program's celebration for International School Library Month on Thursday, October 28, 2022. The event was held virtually and broadcast on the university's YouTube channel. In my talk, I discussed how school library research lives in the space between theory and practice. School library professionals cannot separate one from the other, and so the way we research school librarianship must maintain that connection as well.

Citation: Green, L. (2021). Questões Existentes Entre Teoria e Práxis na Biblioteconomia Escolar. Palestra PPGCI. Universidade Estadual Paulista, Marília, SP, Brazil.

Link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KfUFwMVY18M

LUCY SANTOS GREEN, MELISSA P. JOHNSTON (University of West Georgia), ERICA THOMPSON (Louisiana school librarian), and KELSYE BAUDOIN (Louisiana school librarian)

Citation: Johnston, M. P., Thompson, E., Baudoin, K., & Green, L. (October 23, 2021). Supporting STEM education in your school library with digital resources REALISD. American Association of School Librarians, Salt Lake City, UT.

Abstract: The presentation shared how school librarians can leverage digital resources and professional expertise to support STEM education efforts in their schools. The interactive session focused on identifying free and Open Educational Resources, along with strategies for using these to support STEM. It invited school librarians to expand their toolkit by curating free digital resources for supporting teachers and learners.

LUCY SANTOS GREEN, HEATHER THORE (iSchool adjunct), LESLIE MANIOTES (EQuIP research team member), Carol Cornell (South Carolina classroom teacher)

This presentation shares initial research findings from the IMLS-funded research project EQuIP: https://sc.edu/study/colleges_schools/cic/research/sponsored_awards/equip/index.php

Citation: Green, L., Thore, H., Maniotes, L., & Cornell, C. (October 22, 2021). Transformative inquiry: Librarian and teacher collaborations. American Association of School Librarians, Salt Lake City, Utah.

Abstract: We talk about using inquiry daily, but how often is our instruction actually transformed by putting inquiry at the center? This presentation shares how Guided Inquiry design transformed a collaborative unit into one where the students took total ownership of their learning. It presents strategies to increase collaboration with classroom teachers and have them coming back for more, all while improving student engagement and achievement.

KIM THOMPSON and ANDREW WAKELEE (MLIS alumnus)

This was an invited presentation to discuss what the "next normal" has in store for libraries, archives, and other information associations and the information professionals post-pandemic. We had about 30 participants from MLIS programs, MLIS faculty, the director of the National Library of Jamaica, and other practitioners across the West Indies with great discussion about the social implications of information services during the pandemic and ways we can be sure the "next normal" is inclusive and welcoming. Loved it!

Citation: Thompson, K. M. & Wakelee, A. A. (2021, October 12). Unlocking the Next Normal for the Information Professions. INFOTalk for The University of the West Indies, Jamaica and the Commonwealth Library Association.

Abstract: Information professionals are being very creative in how to respond to COVID-related shut downs and changes in library and other information services. This session will focus on examples of some of these creative changes, and will introduce a tripartite theoretical model that will help information professionals “unlock” decisions about which changes are temporary and which “next normal” changes are here to stay for a more inclusive and inviting community.


WORKSHOP

AMIR KARAMI and EHSAN MOHAMMADI

Dr. Amir Karami organized a full-day workshop at the ASIST 2021 on Oct 29 to promote discussion and disciplinary convergence on the topic of social media research focusing on issues related to the pandemic, elections, dis/misinformation, and social bots. Social media has become a mainstream channel of communication where users share and exchange information. This workshop aimed to: 1) highlight current social media research opportunities and challenges, 2) identify and connect social media researchers, 3) introduce dis/misinformation issues in social media, and 4) provide practical guides to investigators, enhancing their understanding of the grant development process and their abilities to write a successful external grant proposal. This workshop brought together a group of social media researchers and senior faculty who developed successful external proposals to share their research and experiences from the University of Illinois Urbana Champaign, Rutgers University, University of Utah, UNC Chapel Hill, University of Washington, University of Virginia, and University of Tennessee. Annual Meeting of the Association for Information Science and Technology, Oct 29 - Nov 2, 2021, Salt Lake City, Utah. Dr. Ehsan Mohammadi was one of the invited speakers.

Link: https://www.asist.org/sig/sigsm/sig-social-media-workshop/

GRANT AWARD

Yingying Chen

Principal Investigator. The Platformization of Organizational (counter-)Discriminatory Speech on Facebook and Twitter During the Pandemic. Funding through Social Science Research Council and the Summer Institutes in Computational Social Science ($2,500).

This is an interdisciplinary collaboration with Dr. Soumya Mishra (Oxford University, International Development), Catharina O’Donnell (Harvard University, PhD candidate in Sociology), Aurora Perego (University of Trento, PhD candidate in Sociology), Swapna Thorve (University of Virginia, PhD candidate in Computer Science), Miranda Melson (Northeastern University, PhD candidate in Sociology), and Robert Djogbenou (Université de Montréal, PhD candidate in Demography).

Abstract: This research examines the platformization of organizational discriminatory and counter-discriminatory speech -- defined as the technological affordances and economic imperatives of digital media platforms maneuver the production and circulation of both types of speech from civil society organizations (CSOs). CSOs have utilized social media in spreading online discriminatory speech against racial minorities, particularly since the Covid-19 pandemic. The preliminary findings of our pilot study in SICSS-Montréal 2021 demonstrates surging volumes and engagement of both the discriminatory and counter-discriminatory speech from CSOs on Facebook between 2019 and 2021. However, few studies in hate speech investigate to what extent the CSOs also challenge discriminatory speech, and how the two types of speech change over time in countries with varying attitudes towards racial minorities. Previous studies are also limited to understanding how social media platforms have shaped the manufacturing and amplification of both types of speech. By analyzing messages from mainstream American and Canadian CSOs on Facebook and Twitter, our study will (1) Investigate the production of discriminatory and counter-discriminatory discourses by CSOs on social media; (2) Examine the circulation of such discourses integrating computational methods and qualitative analysis. Findings will suggest potential consequences and policy implications to the platformization of the organizational (counter-)discriminatory speech.


BOOK CHAPTERS

JABARI EVANS

Sustaining Black Music and Culture during COVID-19: #Verzuz and Club Quarantine (Lexington Publishing) argues that Instagram is a premier digital leisure space to celebrate and promote Black American culture and identity, particularly evidenced during the early days of the COVID-19 pandemic as the United States grappled with mandated shelter-in-place orders. Club Quarantine (CQ) and Verzuz emerged as highly successful Black music-listening events streamed on Instagram Live, collectively ushering Black (techno)culture through a once-in-a-generation pandemic and beyond. Contributors to this collection explore the communicative and cultural significance of these events as respite from social isolation and as a rearticulated space for Black cultural engagement during the COVID-19 pandemic and increased racial tensions in the United States. This chapter talks about how Black legacy artists used Verzuz as an innovative way to monetize their catalogs during COVID-19. Verzuz is just the latest example of how musicians have used the pandemic to innovate revenue models as opposed to wallow in social isolation.

Citation: Evans, J. M. (2021, Forthcoming). "Old Hits Verzuz New Technology: How a Pandemic Ushered Legacy Artists into the Clout Economy.” In Pickett-Miller, N. (Ed.), #Verzuz and Club Quarantine: Sustaining Black Music and Black Culture During COVID-19. Langham, MD: Lexington Books.

Link: https://rowman.com/ISBN/9781793645043/Sustaining-Black-Music-and-Culture-during-COVID-19-

KAREN GAVIGAN

“To act for a better world”: Using Social Justice Graphic Novels to Empower Youth chapter in the Handbook of Research on Teaching Diverse Youth Literature to Pre-Service Professionals.

Citation: Garrison, K.L. and Gavigan, K.W. (2021). "To Act for a Better World”: Using Social Justice Graphic Novels to Empower Youth. In Hartsfield, D. E. (Ed.) Handbook of Research on Teaching Diverse Youth Literature to Pre-Service Professionals. Hershey, PA: IGI Global.

Abstract: Graphic novels are becoming more and more widely accepted by librarians and teachers as a mainstream literary format for students. They are also effective tools for engaging youth with challenging social issues, as the quote in our title suggests (Schwarz, 2010, p. 71). This chapter provides an overview of ways university instructors can teach pre-service educators to use social justice graphic novels in their high school classrooms and libraries. The content in this chapter is based on findings from research conducted by the authors about social justice issues in young adult graphic novels. The chapter includes an annotated list of selective graphic novel titles based on five social justice issues (racism, immigration and displacement, LGBTQIA+ and gender, mental health, and the environment and climate change). It also provides examples of standards-based best practices for using the graphic novels with pre-service teachers and librarians, award lists, and other educational resources.

Link: https://www.igi-global.com/chapter/to-act-for-a-better-world/285150

ERIC ROBINSON

I authored two chapters of the 6th edition of the widely-used textbook, Media Law and Ethics (Taylor & Francis 2021). Chapter 1, which is entirely new, describes the various components that constitute “the law” in the United States, with an emphasis on those involving the First Amendment freedoms of speech and the press. Chapter 5, which is substantially revised, explains American privacy law, including the generally recognized tort actions and issues regarding privacy online.

Citation: Robinson, E. (2021). American Law, the Legal System and the Judicial Process (chap. 1) and Right of Privacy (chap. 5). In Moore, Roy L.; Murray, Michael D.; and Youm, Kyu Ho, Media Law and Ethics, 6th ed. New York: Routledge. https://doi.org/10.4324/9781003166870.


CONFERENCE POSTER

FEILI TU-KEEFNER

Citation: Tu-Keefner, F., Lyons, D. R., Liu, J., Hobbs, A., & Smith, J. C. (2021, August 17-19). Supporting library staff in Emergencies and natural disasters [Poster presentation]. 2021 IFLA World Library and Information Congress. https://www.ifla-wlic2021.com/.

Abstract: Libraries’ information and community services take on heightened importance during emergencies and natural disasters. Following devastating flooding and hurricanes in South Carolina and Texas, a team from UofSC’s iSchool and the South Carolina State Library addressed the need of providing emergency preparedness, communication (including crisis communication and social media), and health resources to help libraries and partner agencies better plan for disasters. Hear how educational organizations and agencies can strengthen librarians’ abilities to respond in times of crisis. Get the project team’s findings and resources to help your community become better prepared for future emergency and weather events.


JOURNAL ARTICLES

AMIR KARAMI, MICHAEL ZHU (UofSC Honors College Undergraduate), HANNAH R. BOYAJIEFF (UofSC Honors College Undergraduate), and BAILEY GOLDSCHMIDT (UofSC Honors College Undergraduate)

Funded by a UofSC Big Data Health Science Center and published in Vaccine (IF: 4.422) with a collaboration with the City University of New York, this study identifies the sentiment of more than 180,000 tweets.

Citation: Karami, A., Zhu, M., Goldschmidt, B., Boyajieff, H. R., & Najafabadi, M. M. (2021). COVID-19 Vaccine and Social Media in the U.S.: Exploring Emotions and Discussions on Twitter. Vaccines, 9(10), 1059. MDPI AG. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/vaccines9101059

Abstract: The understanding of the public response to COVID-19 vaccines is the key success factor to control the COVID-19 pandemic. To understand the public response, there is a need to explore public opinion. Traditional surveys are expensive and time-consuming, address limited health topics, and obtain small-scale data. Twitter can provide a great opportunity to understand public opinion regarding COVID-19 vaccines. The current study proposes an approach using computational and human coding methods to collect and analyze a large number of tweets to provide a wider perspective on the COVID-19 vaccine. This study identifies the sentiment of tweets using a machine learning rule-based approach, discovers major topics, explores temporal trends, and compares topics of negative and non-negative tweets using statistical tests, and discloses top topics of tweets having negative and non-negative sentiment. Our findings show that the negative sentiment regarding the COVID-19 vaccine had a decreasing trend between November 2020 and February 2021. We found Twitter users have discussed a wide range of topics from vaccination sites to the 2020 U.S. election between November 2020 and February 2021. The findings show that there was a significant difference between tweets having negative and non-negative sentiment regarding the weight of most topics. Our results also indicate that the negative and non-negative tweets had different topic priorities and focuses. This research illustrates that Twitter data can be used to explore public opinion regarding the COVID-19 vaccine.

Link: https://www.mdpi.com/2076-393X/9/10/1059

TARA MORTENSEN

Measuring Photo Credibility in Journalistic Contexts: Scale Development and Application to Staff and Stock Photography Journalism Practice

Citation: Tara Marie Mortensen, Brian P. McDermott & Khadija Ejaz (2021): Measuring Photo Credibility in Journalistic Contexts: Scale Development and Application to Staff and Stock Photography, Journalism Practice, DOI: 10.1080/17512786.2021.1976073

Abstract: Noting its absence, this article presents a newly-developed scale that specifically measures the construct of photo credibility in journalistic contexts. The scale was developed using adaptations of previous media-credibility scale statements and applying them to the context of photography that appears in the news. Using the scale, the study addresses audience perceptions of the credibility of stock photographs versus photographs taken by newspaper-staff photojournalists. The scale proves reliable, and through its use, it is suggested that participants in the study perceive stock photos as significantly less credible than those taken by staff photojournalists. Dimensions of credibility within the scale provide opportunity for more nuanced examination of the nature of these differences of perception.

Link: https://www.tandfonline.com/eprint/F2NJFDWVKMCGPTVSPKYA/full?target=10.1080/17512786.2021.1976073

WESLEY STEVENS

This is my first publication! The article is titled, "Blackfishing on Instagram: Influencing and the Commodification of Black Urban Aesthetics," and was published in the open access journal Social Media + Society on August 13, 2021. My research examines how Black identity is understood, regulated, and appropriated through digital platforms. Much of my work reveals how cultural and political notions of racialized identities are embedded in digital technologies themselves, facilitating racist practices while simultaneously creating space for digital activism and creative expression.

Citation: Stevens, W. E. (2021). Blackfishing on Instagram: Influencing and the Commodification of Black Urban Aesthetics. Social Media+ Society, 7(3), 20563051211038236.

Abstract: This article examines blackfishing, a practice in which cultural and economic agents appropriate Black culture and urban aesthetics in an effort to capitalize on Black markets. Specifically, this study analyzes the Instagram accounts of four influencers (Instagram models) who were accused of blackfishing in late 2018 and is supplemented with a critical analysis of 27 news and popular press articles which comprise the media discourse surrounding the controversy. Situated within the literature on cultural appropriation and urban redevelopment policies, this study explores how Black identity is mined for its cultural and economic value in the context of digital labor. I assert that Instagram’s unique platform affordances (including its racial affordances) and the neoliberal logics which undergird cultural notions of labor facilitate the mechanisms by which Black identity is rendered a lucrative commodity vis-à-vis influencing.

Link: https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/20563051211038236

KIM THOMPSON and AMANDA REED (MLIS alumna)

Peer-reviewed article published in the International Journal of Information, Diversity, and Inclusion. Public libraries have had to make deep changes during the COVID pandemic, evolving and adapting quickly to continue to support the local community during a global crisis. This article uses Richland Library as a case to demonstrate three aspects of decision-making related to information access: physical access, intellectual access, and social access.

Citation: Thompson, K. M., & Reed, A. (2021). Learning from pandemic mode to create a sustainable digital future: Using a tripartite model of information access and digital inclusion. The International Journal of Information, Diversity, & Inclusion, 5(3), https://jps.library.utoronto.ca/index.php/ijidi/article/view/36195

Abstract: Public libraries are known as places for information, communication, and gathering, but what happens when a pandemic restricts social contact? In the years 2020 and 2021, in response to the coronavirus pandemic, libraries worldwide revised services and explored new ways to provide information and support to communities—primarily through digital services. This conceptual analytical paper responds to this approach by suggesting the use of a tripartite information access and digital inclusion model that can be used for evaluative processes related to ensuring ongoing physical, intellectual, and social access to public library services during a public crisis shutdown. We provide an overview of some of the new and altered services provided within the case of the Richland Library system in South Carolina, USA, and then discuss these changes using the tripartite model as a means to illustrate how this theoretical model can be employed for practical evaluation and decision-making.

TAYLOR WEN, CHANG WON CHOI (Ph.D. student), and LINWAN WU

This article looks at what drive people's sharing of viral advertisements on social media. We found that if the viral ads can trigger individuals' sense of empowerment, it will not only increase the share intention of the ads but also the purchase intention of the product featured in the ads.

Citation: Wen, T. J., Choi, C. W., Wu, L., & Morris, J. D. (2021). Empowering Emotion: The Driving Force of Share and Purchase Intentions in Viral Advertising. Journal of Current Issues & Research in Advertising, 1-21.

Abstract: This research adopts the PAD model of emotions (i.e., pleasure–arousal–dominance) and conducts two survey studies to empirically test the role of emotions in viral advertising. Study 1 confirms the positive role of pleasure, arousal, and dominance in making a video commercial spread virally. Results demonstrate that dominance is the strongest predictor among the three dimensions to explain increased share and purchase intentions. More importantly, Study 2 shows that psychological empowerment is the underlying mechanism that explains the effects of dominance on both share and purchase intentions. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed.

Link: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/pdf/10.1080/10641734.2021.1937408?casa_token=fbw4tsIJRIMAAAAA:LDedArD3TAWozf3tqZh6oBmIcSBosE7KKHOsLXU-qT6egDfHpcMfhWdhr1KbUR7YkgS5sjQjLCzwwQ

TAYLOR WEN and JACKSON CARTER (Ph.D. student)

Citation: Wen, T. J., Carter, J., Sar, S., Anghelcev, G., & Ham, C. D. (2021). Effects of Affect: How Mood and Arousal Influence Consumer Evaluation of Search Engine Result Page (SERP) Ad Snippets. Journal of Interactive Advertising, 1-14.

Abstract: An experiment was conducted with the goal of determining how mood and arousal influence the way consumers process ad information in a search engine result page (SERP) environment. By focusing on the relationships among mood, arousal, and search ad snippet length, the study shows that mood and arousal states influence information processing (heuristic vs. systematic) on search pages both independently and jointly. Using the heuristic-systematic model, the present research explains how information processing modes triggered by mood and amplified by arousal shape the processing and evaluations of search ads with different snippet lengths. Both theoretical and practical implications are discussed.

Link: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/pdf/10.1080/15252019.2021.1950081?casa_token=7B4IPufRQEIAAAAA:YmVBgkafGW8v7_-yQ2nYHXVmQC-C9fjX6xYQ9CP_YoEPUQnvHcD6XTfAG_IehoqJm-tS_euvSwr2vA

LINWAN WU

Citation: Bayliss, L., & Wu, L. (2022). Should you “picture” this? Effects of picture-taking features of food diary apps on memory, liking, and wanting. Appetite. 168(1). DOI: 10.1016/j.appet.2021.105682

Abstract: Picture-taking functions are commonly available features in food diaries and other mobile applications that may influence how we think about the very food we consume. Because memories of food (Higgs & Donohoe, 2011) and the act of recording food consumption (Turk et al., 2013) have been shown to influence desire for and consumption of food, this paper investigated the effects of using the picture-taking feature of a food diary app on liking, wanting, and memory of food. Using a simple food diary app with a picture-taking feature loaded onto iPads, participants took part in a lab experiment where they either did or did not use the picture-taking feature of the app as they ate a snack. To capture the changes in liking and wanting that naturally occur as more food is consumed, participants were also randomly assigned to receive either larger or smaller portions of the snack. The results indicate that picture-taking while eating is associated with greater wanting of the food following consumption. Furthermore, for smaller portions of food, taking pictures during consumption is associated with greater liking of the food. However, taking pictures in the smaller portion size condition was also associated with less detailed recall of food's sensory properties.

Link: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0195666321005894


PANELS & PRESENTATIONS

KIM THOMPSON and ANDREW WAKELEE (MLIS student)

No travel (virtual) but it was for the 2021 Summit of the International Society for the Study of Information, September 12-19, 2021.

Citation: Wakelee, A. & Thompson, K. M. (2021). Including Latinx communities in libraries: A theoretical approach to information access. The 2021 Summit of International Society for the Study of Information, September 12-19, 2021.

Abstract: Even as the Latinx community has emerged as the largest ethnic minority group in the United States (18% of the US population), this population faces multiple barriers to information access and equity. This paper uses a three-pronged holistic theoretical approach to examine libraries serving Latinx communities in the United States, specifically at academic libraries at universities defined as Hispanic Serving Institutions (HSIs).

Link: Presentation: https://tfpis.com/session-presentations/ Proceedings: https://tfpis.com/session-4-information-in-social-sciences/

KIM THOMPSON

The panel focused on the questions: What efforts are LIS programs making to address the challenges faced by faculty members to ensure not only the sustainability of the educational program but also a dignified and fair treatment of faculty members? and What are possible scenarios for a post-COVID future of LIS education, and how can faculty members be best supported and inspired to achieve resilience for a sustainable future?

Citation: Caidi, N., Dali, K., Assefa, S., Thompson, K. M., & Goulding, A. (2021, September 23). “Put Your Mask on First before Helping Others”: Faculty Members as a Neglected Population During COVID. Juried panel presented at the Association for Library and Information Science Education 2021 Conference: Crafting a Resilient Future -- Leadership, Education, & Inspiration, 20-24 September, virtual.

Abstract: Our panel sought to address the ways in which faculty members in LIS/IS programs have contended with the various changes and challenges stemming from the global pandemic of COVID-19 as well as broader –and related- trends reshaping the academic landscape.

KIM THOMPSON and CLAYTON COPELAND

Our hands-on session focused on the training of LIS professionals that helps them embrace accessibility by using scenarios for inclusive hiring practices.

Citation: Adkins, D., Bushman, B., Cahill, M., Dickey, T., Farmer, L., Wong, M., Hill, H., Copeland, C. A., Mallary, K., & Thompson, K. M. (2021, September 22). Leading, Educating, and Inspiring LIS Professionals to Embrace Accessibility for a Resilient Future. SIG panel presented at the Association for Library and Information Science Education 2021 Conference: Crafting a Resilient Future -- Leadership, Education, & Inspiration, 20-24 September, virtual.

Abstract: The COVID years (2020-2021) have put the issues of disability and accessibility in the spotlight. Social interactions, employment, studies, and day-to-day activities for some people with disabilities have become increasingly more challenging than before; and yet, others have found opportunity and even relief in working from home, having a chance to avoid the grueling commute and inaccessible physical environments often associated with workplaces. The pandemic and remote engagements have thus highlighted disparities within the disabled community itself: those with comfortable living conditions, information literacy skills, and stable internet access fared exceedingly better than individuals lacking these conditions. People with disabilities in all LIS constituent groups have been affected: students, librarians, library users, faculty, and academic staff. This has shown the need for building resilience and intensifying discussion on the importance of accessibility. This session brought together over a dozen educators from American and Canadian LIS programs for lightning talk presentations accompanied by hands-on interactive activities.

FEILI TU-KEEFNER

Citation: Tu-Keefner, F., Lyons, D. R., Liu, J., Hobbs, A., & Smith, J. C. (2021, September 9-10). Supporting library staff in Emergencies and natural disasters. Emergency Preparedness & Disaster Planning Summit, Columbia, SC, United States.

Abstract: Libraries’ information and community services take on heightened importance during emergencies and natural disasters. Following devastating flooding and hurricanes in South Carolina and Texas, a team from UofSC’s iSchool and the South Carolina State Library addressed the need of providing emergency preparedness, communication (including crisis communication and social media), and health resources to help libraries and partner agencies better plan for disasters. Hear how educational organizations and agencies can strengthen librarians’ abilities to respond in times of crisis. Get the project team’s findings and resources to help your community become better prepared for future emergency and weather events.


SPEAKING ENGAGEMENTS

JUNGMI JUN and BONGKI WOO (College of Social Work)

Jun provided a CTE training session and discussed anti-Asian COVID-19 racism and strategies to empower and support Asians in our communities with instructors across our campus. Materials available upon your request!

FEILI TU-KEEFNER

Our team conducted research in South Carolina and Texas from 2015-2019. The studies were situation-specific examinations of how disaster information was disseminated and what services were provided by public libraries in these states. Many public librarians in South Carolina are alums of our school, and we wanted to know how our graduates provided community-first information services in times of crisis.

Citation: Tu-Keefner, F., Lyons, D. R., Liu, J., Hobbs, A., & Smith, J. C. (2021, September 17). Supporting library staff in Emergencies and natural disasters. In K. William & C. Chu (Chairs), Minitalks: Libraries, literature, literacies [Minitalk Series]. University of Illinois.

Abstract: Libraries’ information and community services take on heightened importance during emergencies and natural disasters. Following devastating flooding and hurricanes in South Carolina and Texas, a team from UofSC’s iSchool and the South Carolina State Library addressed the need of providing emergency preparedness, communication (including crisis communication and social media), and health resources to help libraries and partner agencies better plan for disasters. Hear how educational organizations and agencies can strengthen librarians’ abilities to respond in times of crisis. Get the project team’s findings and resources to help your community become better prepared for future emergency and weather events.

Link: https://publish.illinois.edu/minitalks/events/

 

AWARDS & GRANTS

 SABRINA HABIB

Best research paper award for the study, "Training to Lead in an Era of Change: Insights from Ad Agency Leaders," from the Journal of Advertising Education was presented at the AEJMC 2021 virtual conference. Advertising agencies don't have systematic training for their leaders and agree there is a need. Current leaders believe universities should incorporate leadership training in more meaningful ways in the curriculum.

Citation: Habib, S., & Patwardhan, P. (2020). Training to Lead in an Era of Change: Insights from Ad Agency Leaders. Journal of Advertising Education, 24(1), 36–51.

Abstract: This study examines leadership training in advertising. Interviews with U.S.-based agency professionals revealed the lack of a systematic approach to leadership development. There was a consensus among professionals that training (whether formal or informal) is needed. Despite need and benefits of establishing leadership training programs in agencies, participants acknowledged barriers to doing so. The study also finds a role for advertising education to train the next generation of advertising leaders.

Link: https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/1098048219840783#

VANESSA KITZIE and SUZANNE SWAN (Psychology department)

Funding through the University of Cincinnati Center for Criminal Justice Research - interdisciplinary partnership between Dr. Bonnie Fisher (Professor), Dr. Suzanne Swan (Professor), and Dr. Vanessa Kitzie

Citation: Co-Principal Investigator. Informing and Designing a Drugging Tracking Website. University of Cincinnati Center for Criminal Justice Research (CCJR) Faculty Research Support Award (PI Bonnie Fisher). $5,000. 2021-2022.

Abstract: This project seeks to understand the drugging-related information needs of undergraduate students, and challenges they experience when seeking, sharing, and using this information. Findings will inform the design of a website that supports these needs and addresses past experienced challenges.

LEIGH MOSCOWITZ

The new book, titled "Media Stereotypes: From Ageism to Xenophobia," is the recipient of the 2021 Broadcast Education Association Textbook of the Year Award. Moscowitz is an author contributor to the book, edited by Andrew Billings and Scott Parrott from the University of Alabama. Moscowitz's chapter considers the evolution of LGBTQ representations in the media and is titled, "Coming Out in Primetime: Stereotypes of LGBTQ Communities."

Citation: Media Stereotypes: From Ageism to Xenophobia. (2020). United States: Peter Lang.

Abstract: When we think about the "pictures in our heads" that media create and perpetuate, what images are we truly referencing? Issues of media stereotypes and representation (both past and present) are crucial to advancing media literacy. Media Stereotypes: From Ageism to Xenophobia becomes one-stop shopping for synthesizing what we know within the composite of stereotyping research in the United States. Utilizing a cast of top American scholars with deep roots in asking stereotype-based questions, this book is essential reading for those wishing to understand what we know about past and present media representations as well as those wishing to take the baton and continue to advance media stereotyping research in the future.Link: https://www.peterlang.com/view/title/70943


CONFERENCE PAPERS

 LEIGH MOSCOWITZ

Our research in progress, titled "’Well, he is paid to be violent...’: How athlete identity alters perceptions of domestic violence incidents," has been accepted for presentation at the 2021 BEA On Location in Las Vegas October 10-12. The conference had its highest number of submissions ever this year. Moscowitz is part of a research team including Kenon Brown, Andrew Billings and Melvin Lewis, all colleagues from the University of Alabama.

The Broadcast Education Association On-Location is a hybrid event this year with in-person presentations in Las Vegas Oct. 10-12. Moscowitz and team will be presenting on Sunday, Oct. 10. Link to the conference program: https://www.beaweb.org/OL/2021-program


JOURNAL ARTICLES

JABARI EVANS

In August of 2021, my article on Hip-Hop culture's place in the Civic media education of African American adolescents was published via open access in Pedagogy, Media & Society. It will be published in print later this fall. I believe we need to re-think civic education in the 21st century by better utilizing youth media subcultures. Using qualitative data, I propose a framework for using Hip-Hop as an artistic practice in the formal classroom to better engage African American youth in civic reasoning as well as connect their personal interests in media-making to civic engagement and academic achievement.

Citation: Evans, J. (2021). Reframing civic education through hip-hop artistic practices: an empowerment and equity-based learning model for black adolescents. Pedagogy, Culture & Society, 1-17.

Abstract: Using the Connected Learning framework as a conceptual lens, this study utilizes interviews and focus groups to explore classroom outcomes of a Hip-Hop Music Education program piloted within two predominantly African American urban elementary schools. Three specific themes that emerged within post-program discussions with participants were that the program’s critical elements were that it: a) valued student enthusiasm for Hip-Hop music culture and centered discussions of its current social climate as appropriate for the academic setting, b) provided mentorship to see music as an agent for social change and c) nurtured their Hip-Hop identities in ways that were impactful for their individual trajectories. These findings suggest that Hip-Hop education programmes can be supportive to Black youths’ critical thinking, individual empowerment and understanding of community. To conclude, I argue that participation in Hip-Hop Based Education programs are a multi-dimensional asset that can empower Black youths for the media literacy education necessary to navigate their social, civic, personal, academic and professional lives. Link: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/14681366.2021.1952294?journalCode=rpcs20

JUNGMI JUN, SEI-HILL KIM and SOOBUM LEE

Citation: Lee, S., Kim, S.-H., & Jun, J. (2021). Who is responsible for campus sexual assaults? News media use, attributions of responsibility, and college students’ perceived risk and willingness to engage in preventive behaviors. Journal of Sexual Aggression, 1–17. https://doi.org/10.1080/13552600.2021.1961887

Abstract: Using a survey of college students in the US, this study examines whether the way students attribute responsibility is associated with perceived risk of sexual assaults and willingness to engage in preventive behaviors. We then link news media use to attributions of responsibility to examine whether media use is related with risk perceptions and preventive behaviors through the mediation of attributions of responsibility. Attributing responsibility to victims was correlated with perceiving a lower risk, while finding colleges responsible was related with perceiving a greater risk. Such relationships were moderated by gender, suggesting that attributions of responsibility might have different effects between male and female students. Attributions of responsibility were also associated with helping victims and taking protective measures. Finally, news media use was positively correlated with blaming victims, while negatively associated with finding perpetrators responsible, and these attributions of responsibility mediated the link between media use and the outcome variables.

AMIR KARAMI, MORGAN LUNDY (MLIS Aluma), FRANK WEBB (Undergraduate Honors College Aluma), HANNAH R. BOYAJIEFF (Undergraduate Honors College Student), MICHAEL ZHU (Undergraduate Honors College Student), and DORATHEA LEE (Undergraduate Honors College Student)

Funded by a UofSC ASPIRE grant and Big Data Health Science Center and published in Electronics (IF: 2.397), this study opens a new direction in categorizing LGBT users by collecting over 16,000 Twitter accounts, obtaining profiles information of the accounts, and developing classifiers using machine learning techniques. This research will assist in studying different issues (e.g., health and information behavior) of the LGBT population in large-scale projects.

Citation: Karami, A., Lundy, M., Webb, F., Boyajieff, H. R., Zhu, M., & Lee, D. (2021). Automatic Categorization of LGBT User Profiles on Twitter with Machine Learning. Electronics, 10(15), 1822.

Abstract: Privacy needs and stigma pose significant barriers to lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) people sharing information related to their identities in traditional settings and research methods such as surveys and interviews. Fortunately, social media facilitates people’s belonging to and exchanging information within online LGBT communities. Compared to heterosexual respondents, LGBT users are also more likely to have accounts on social media websites and access social media daily. However, the current relevant LGBT studies on social media are not efficient or assume that any accounts that utilize LGBT-related words in their profile belong to individuals who identify as LGBT. Our human coding of over 16,000 accounts instead proposes the following three categories of LGBT Twitter users: individual, sexual worker/porn, and organization. This research develops a machine learning classifier based on the profile and bio features of these Twitter accounts. To have an efficient and effective process, we use a feature selection method to reduce the number of features and improve the classifier’s performance. Our approach achieves a promising result with around 88% accuracy. We also develop statistical analyses to compare the three categories based on the average weight of top features. Link: https://www.mdpi.com/2079-9292/10/15/1822

VANESSA KITZIE

Citation: Wagner, T.L. & Kitzie, V. (2021). "Access necessitates being seen": Queer visibility and intersectional embodiment within the health information practices of queer community leaders. Journal of Information Science.

Abstract: Navigating healthcare infrastructures is particularly challenging for queer-identifying individuals, with significant barriers emerging around stigma and practitioner ignorance. Further intersecting, historically marginalized identities such as one’s race, age or ability exacerbate such engagement with healthcare, particularly the access to and use of reliable and appropriate health information. We explore the salience of one’s queer identity relative to other embodied identities when navigating health information and care for themselves and their communities. Thirty semi-structured interviews with queer community leaders from South Carolina inform our discussion of the role one’s queer visibility plays relational to the visibility of other identities. We find that leaders and their communities navigate these intersectional visibilities through unique and iterative approaches to health information seeking, sharing and use predicated upon anti-queer, racist, ableist and misogynistic sentiments. Findings can inform queer-inclusive, intersectionally informed interventions by health and information professionals such as nonprofit advocacy organizations and medical librarians.

VANESSA KITZIE

Citation: Kitzie, V. (2021). “Am I doing it right”: Examining authenticity as a key mediator of insider/outsider dynamics among US LGBTQ+ millennials [Special issue, “Chatman Revisited: Re-examining and Resituating Social Theories of Identity, Access, and Marginalization in LIS”]. Journal of Critical Library and Information Studies, Eds. A.N. Gibson & N.A. Cooke.

Abstract: A key mechanism of information marginalization, insider/outsider dynamics shape who gets to seek, share, and use information within a specific context. However, these dynamics are limited because LIS literature often treats them as myopic, totalizing, and static. This study deepens understanding of these dynamics by examining how they are shaped by authenticity narratives of identity among US LGBTQ+ young adults (ages 18-37). Data were collected via semi-structured interviews with 30 LGBTQ+ young adults between 2015-2016. Data analysis was iterative and employed both deductive and inductive qualitative coding. Findings demonstrate how authenticity both assisted and hindered participant seeking, sharing, and use of identity-related information. Participants seldom reported barriers to access, often citing readily available information in the form of lifeworld and small world narratives describing the "right" or "correct" way to be a particular identity. This information influenced participant decision-making since they had to engage in prescribed activities to be deemed authentic by others. However, authenticity limited participants' information practices to fit within insider, regulatory frames. Embodied subjectivity via individual perceptions and experiences emerged as a valuable information source for participants to counter these limitations. This phenomenon did not shut off participants from outside information as previously argued by Merton and Chatman but rather opened participants up to new, information avenues outside of those provided by authenticity narratives. Findings have theoretical implications for a better understanding of insider/outsider dynamics as a critical dynamic of information marginalization.

Link: https://journals.litwinbooks.com/index.php/jclis/article/view/143


PANELS, PRESENTATIONS & SPEAKING ENGAGEMENTS

SABRINA HABIB

Moderator/organizer of the VisCom Teaching Marathon Panel at the AEJMC 2021 virtual conference. Visual Communications educators shared their best teaching tips in an exciting lighting round.

BROOKE MCKEEVER

Glen Nowak, from the University of Georgia, invited me to serve as a panelist on the opening plenary of the National Conference on Health Communication, Marketing, and Media with him and Kelly Moore, from the Immunization Action Coalition. We were supposed to provide remarks in response to Dr. Heidi Larson's presentation, but because of a technical difficulty, we were unable to view Dr. Larson's presentation, and the three of us became the opening plenary panel. More than 650 people attended live during the virtual session, and they were gracious about the technical problem. Approximately 3,000 registered for this virtual conference.

Link: https://www.nchcmm.org/

BROOKE MCKEEVER

The South Carolina Cancer Alliance invited me to do a presentation on Vaccine Hesitancy and Communication During COVID-19 for their HPV workgroup, which includes practitioners and academics from across the state.

TARA MORTENSEN

Tara will serve as a moderator for part of a series called, “Picturing Democracy,” part of the national initiative spearheaded by the Federation of State Humanities Councils titled, “Democracy and the Informed Citizen.” The national initiative and this series have been funded by the Mellon Foundation. The event will take place Oct 13 at the Sottile Theatre in Charleston.

AWARDS

 SHANNON BOWEN

Citation: Bowen, S. A. & Neill, M. S. (2021, August). Ethical organizational listening for stakeholder engagement and moral responsibility in issues management. Paper presented at the meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, New Orleans (online). Media Ethics Division. * Top Paper Award for Professional Relevance.

Abstract: Ethical listening is an essential component of strategic issues management as an executive-level problem solving function. This qualitative study of elite Chief Communications Officers (CCOs) seeks to help fill a gap in making listening an explicit and purposeful part of ethics. We seek to enhance the vital role of listening in engaging stakeholders and demonstrating moral responsibility in issues management.


BOOKS

ERIC ROBINSON

Publication of my textbook, Cyber Law and Ethics: Regulation of the Connected World (Routledge, 2021; released July 13, 2021), co-authored with Mark Grabowski. A primer on legal issues relating to cyberspace, this textbook introduces business, policy and ethical considerations raised by our use of information technology.

Citation: Grabowski, M. and Robinson, E. (2021) Cyber Law and Ethics: Regulation of the Connected World (Routledge).

Abstract: A primer on legal issues relating to cyberspace, this textbook introduces business, policy and ethical considerations raised by our use of information technology. With a focus on the most significant issues impacting internet users and businesses in the United States of America, the book provides coverage of key topics such as social media, online privacy, artificial intelligence and cybercrime as well as emerging themes such as doxing, ransomware, revenge porn, data-mining, e-sports and fake news. The authors, experienced in journalism, technology and legal practice, provide readers with expert insights into the nuts and bolts of cyber law. Cyber Law and Ethics: Regulation of the Connected World provides a practical presentation of legal principles and is essential reading for non-specialist students dealing with the intersection of the internet and the law. Link


CONFERENCE PAPERS

YINGYING CHEN

Citation: Chen, Y., & Wang, L., (2021). The Contagion of Political Incivility in Response to Donald Trump’s Election Campaign Videos on YouTube. Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication Annual Conference, Virtual.

Abstract: Previous studies have paid less attention to the unexpected consequence of political advertising on YouTube. Particularly, political incivility linking to political videos on YouTube is one of the triggers of partisan polarization and the spread of misinformation. To address the issue, this study examines the contagion of political incivility linking to a campaign video posted by former U.S. President Donald Trump during the 2020 presidential election. Based on a false accusation of Biden’s tax plan, the video triggered the most polarized reactions. Using dynamic network analysis and network modeling, we find that reciprocity and heterophily (between-group interactions) are major mechanisms at work in the formation of political incivility. Contrary to previous findings, we show that online political incivility is not ephemeral but revived and sustained as YouTube’s algorithm promoted the video. Our findings provide implications to the platform design and platform governance in curbing the spread of online political incivility.

YINGYING CHEN

Citation: Chen, Y., & Wang, L. (2021). An Automated Method to Classify Users in Twitter Event Data. The 7th International Conference on Computational Social Science (IC2S2 2021), ETH Zurich, Virtual.

Abstract: This study proposes an automated method to disaggregate Twitter accounts that were involved in climate change discussions on Twitter from 12 events from 2012 to 2015. Based on two unique training datasets, we used a multi-class supervised machine learning model to identify individual people, news media, politicians, environmental advocacy organizations, and other organizational actors. Our automated classification method helps future studies to investigate the role of organizational actors in mobilizing issue-related attention on Twitter. The method also helps future studies extend the understanding of information diffusion mechanisms within and beyond Twitter.

YINGYING CHEN and SEI-HILL KIM

Citation: Chen, Y., Peng, Z., & Kim, S., (2021). The Strength and Pitfalls of Topic Modeling in Communication Studies: A Systematic Review. Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication Annual Conference, Virtual.

Abstract: Topic modeling is an unsupervised machine learning method for identifying latent structures in large size text data. It has become an increasingly popular computational social science method for communication scholars to analyze large volumes of text data from digital media. Evaluating studies applying this method, scholars have raised questions about the theoretical contributions, methodological reliability, and validity. To explore the techniques and approaches that maximize the strength of topic modeling, this study provides a systematic review of studies that used topic modeling in top communication journals from 2010 to 2021. The review is based on three aspects: methodological reliability and validity, connection to theories, and research design. Our findings provide implications for future studies.


JOURNAL ARTICLES

SHANNON BOWEN

This project was supported by a Page Legacy Scholar Grant from The Arthur W. Page Center at The Pennsylvania State University's College of Communications. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of The Pennsylvania State University.

Citation: Neill, M. S. & Bowen, S. A. (2021). Ethical listening to employees during a pandemic: New approaches, barriers and lessons. Journal of Communication Management, 25(3), 276-297. Link  

Abstract: The purpose of this study was to identify new challenges to organizational listening posed by a global pandemic and how organizations are overcoming those barriers. Design/methodology/approach: The researchers conducted 30 in-depth interviews with US communication management professionals. Findings: Communication management professionals value listening, but do not always make it the priority that it merits. They listed lack of desire of senior management, time, and trust of employees as barriers to effective organizational listening. The global COVID pandemic has made it more challenging to connect to employees working remotely and to observe nonverbal cues that are essential in communication. Organizations are adapting by using more frequent pulse surveys, video conferencing technology and mobile applications. Most importantly, this pandemic has enhanced moral sensitivity and empathy leading organizations to make decisions based on ethical considerations. Research limitations/implications: The researchers examined organizational listening applying employee-organization relationships (EOR) theory and found that trust is essential. Trust can be enhanced through building relationships with employees, ethical listening and closing the feedback loop by communicating how employers are using the feedback received by employees to make a positive change. Practical implications: Communication managers need to place a higher priority on listening to employees. Their listening efforts need to be authentic, morally autonomous or open-minded, and empathetic to respect the genuine concerns of employees and how organizational decisions will affect them. Listening is essential to serving as an ethical and effective strategic counselor. Originality/value: The study examines organizational listening in the context of a global pandemic. Link

AMIR KARAMI, SUZANNE SWAN (Psychology), MELEK Y. SPINEL (Psychology Ph.D. alumna), NICOLE C. WHITE (Psychology Ph.D. alumna) and KAYLA FORD (Psychology Undergraduate alumna)

Supported by an ASPIRE grant, we published a paper in Sustainability (IF: 3.251). We proposed a framework for computational literature review. We collected 5320 research papers published between 1977 and 2020, identified and analyzed sexual harassment topics, and explored the temporal trend of topics. Our analysis shows that 62.5% of the topics having a significant trend had an increasing (hot) temporal trend that is expected to be studied more in the coming years. This research could be beneficial to researchers, educators, publishers, and policymakers by providing a broad overview of the sexual harassment field.

Citation: Karami, A., Spinel, M. Y., White, C. N., Ford, K., & Swan, S. (2021). A Systematic Literature Review of Sexual Harassment Studies with Text Mining. Sustainability, 13(12), 6589.

Abstract: Sexual harassment has been the topic of thousands of research articles in the 20th and 21st centuries. Several review papers have been developed to synthesize the literature about sexual harassment. While traditional literature review studies provide valuable insights, these studies have some limitations including analyzing a limited number of papers, being time-consuming and labor-intensive, focusing on a few topics, and lacking temporal trend analysis. To address these limitations, this paper employs both computational and qualitative approaches to identify major research topics, explore temporal trends of sexual harassment topics over the past few decades, and point to future possible directions in sexual harassment studies. We collected 5320 research papers published between 1977 and 2020, identified and analyzed sexual harassment topics, and explored the temporal trend of topics. Our findings indicate that sexual harassment in the workplace was the most popular research theme, and sexual harassment was investigated in a wide range of spaces ranging from school to military settings. Our analysis shows that 62.5% of the topics having a significant trend had an increasing (hot) temporal trend that is expected to be studied more in the coming years. This study offers a bird’s eye view to better understand sexual harassment literature with text mining, qualitative, and temporal trend analysis methods. This research could be beneficial to researchers, educators, publishers, and policymakers by providing a broad overview of the sexual harassment field. Link

ANLI XIAO

My paper coauthored with Dr. Michail Vafeiadis at Auburn University was published in Public Relations Review this year.

Citation: Vafeiadis, M., & Xiao, A. (2021). Fake news: How emotions, involvement, need for cognition and rebuttal evidence (story vs. informational) influence consumer reactions toward a targeted organization. Public Relations Review, 47(4), 102088.

Abstract: This study investigated the interplay of consumer involvement, NFC, and emotional reactions when exposed to fake news on social media, and subsequently to an organizational rebuttal. In doing so, a 2 (rebuttal evidence type: story vs. informational) x 2 (involvement: low vs. high) x 2 (need for cognition, NFC: low vs. high) experiment was conducted. Results showed that individuals high in involvement and NFC perceived favorably the rebuttal message as well as exhibited positive attitudes and higher donation intentions toward the affected organization when it responded to the rumors. A significant two-way interaction between rebuttal evidence type and involvement indicated that high-involved consumers reacted positively toward the informational evidence, whereas low-involved ones preferred storytelling evidence and this increased their donation intentions. Following an organizational refutation, it was demonstrated that the effects of negative emotions (e.g., anger, fear, sadness, disgust, anxiety) were mitigated while those of positive emotions (e.g., hope, happiness, empathy, contentment, interest) increased, leading to favorable attitudinal, donation, and social media engagement reactions. Also, individuals high in involvement and NFC displayed more positive affective reactions after receiving a rebuttal message than their low-involved and low-NFC counterparts. The mediation analyses revealed that positive emotions were significant mediators of the effects of the story-based refutation, high-involved, and high-NFC consumers on the latter’s evaluations of the targeted organization. Link


PANELS & PRESENTATIONS

KAREN GAVIGAN and DANIELLA COOK (UofSC College of Education)

Tragedy, Healing, Understanding: Teaching Civil Rights through Primary Sources and Graphic Novels

Abstract: As stated on the ALA Diversity web page, "The strength of libraries has always been the diversity of their collections and commitment to serving all people." This session provides a forum for helping participants use diverse resources to teach the civil rights movement. Primary sources from the Library of Congress will be paired with graphic novels to help bring this decades-long movement to life. Lesson plans, web sites, and other resources will be shared. The session is appropriate for school librarians working with young adults. Participants will join in a discussion about how to make civil rights relevant to students.

KAREN GAVIGAN and CLAYTON COPELAND

Inclusionary Best Practices for School Library Programs. Presented at Virtual Conference of the International Association of School Librarians

Abstract: School library programming and services have direct impacts on student achievement. Equitable access is a key component for education. All children deserve equitable access to books and reading, to information, and to information technology in an environment that is safe and conducive to learning. For the 1 in 5 students who has disability(ies), however, there are persistent barriers to inclusion. This session shares strategies from successful inclusive programming, or programming for students who are typically- and differently-able, in a middle school library in South Carolina.

KAREN GAVIGAN and APRIL DAWKINS (iSchool PhD alumna)

Making Your eBooks Fly. Presented at International Association of School Librarians' 2021 Virtual Conference.

Abstract: This Information and Communications Technology (ICT) SIG session will further our goals exploring trends in emerging technologies and share research about implementation. The presenters will share findings from a study of eBook usage in high schools in two U.S. states. Using circulation data and interviews, the researchers found reasons why some librarians are more successful than others in increasing circulation. Participants will learn a simple way to examine their holdings to determine how well their eBook collections are being used. Additionally, participants will discuss marketing strategies to encourage usage of eBooks.

KAREN GAVIGAN and KASEY GARRISON (Charles Sturt University, Australia)

Using Social Justice Graphic Novels to Teach Global Diversity, Equity,and Inclusion. Presneted at International Association of School Librarians' 2021 Virtual Conference.

Abstract: Teaching youth about social justice issues, and promoting diversity in books, is crucial to supporting global citizenship and building cultural empathy. The duality of text and illustrations in graphic novels make them excellent tools for teaching social justice topics. In this session, participants will learn about social justice graphic novels and explore best practices in using them with young adults. Information will be provided about the project website with an annotated bibliography, lesson plans, and other resources.

JASON PORTER, EVAN MEANEY (SVAD) and JEANNE BRITTON (Irvin Department of Rare Books and Special Collections)

I spoke about my VR project, The Virtual Piranesi, on a panel about digitizing Giovanni Piranesi's work for his 300th birthday. The conference (Piranesi@300) was based in Rome, however my panel was virtual. The Virtual Piranesi recreates and re-interprets Giovanni Piranesi’s original immersive 2D views through interactive virtual reality. It is part multi-player video-game, part art-history lesson, and part wearable museum.

BROOKE MCKEEVER and JUNGMI JUN

Our panel, "Misinformation, Racism, and the Magnification of Health Inequities: Research Informing Publics and the Practice (and Vice Versa)," took place during AEJMC on Thursday, Aug. 5. It was co-sponsored by the Public Relations and ComSHER divisions.

Citation: Misinformation, Racism, and the Magnification of Health Inequities: Research Informing Publics and the Practice (and Vice Versa). Panel proposed and accepted for presentation at the AEJMC Conference in New Orleans, LA (August 2021).

Abstract: Misinformation has long been a problem in our field; however, the COVID-19 pandemic, racist rhetoric tweeted from the White House, national protests inspired by Black Lives Matter and other events in 2020-2021 brought issues related to truth, trust, and social justice to the forefront of public discourse. In this panel, scholars will 1) discuss how their work contributes to our collective understanding of misunderstanding, and 2) set a research agenda for how future work can more closely examine the intersection of misinformation, racism, health disparities, and social justice. Panelists included: Maria E. Len-Rios, University of Georgia; Lee Ann Kahlor, University of Texas at Austin; Jungmi Jun, University of South Carolina; Arunima Krishna, Boston University; Ellie Yang, University of Wisconsin-Madison; and Brooke McKeever, University of South Carolina, as moderator. Note: Sean Upshaw from UT-Austin replaced Jungmi Jun (due to a family health issue). We missed you, Jun!


SPEAKING ENGAGEMENTS

SHANNON BOWEN

Workshop on moral philosophy and ethical decision making for governmental chief information officers (CIO) in the Jamaican Government computer infrastructure.

SHANNON BOWEN

Keynote address on the importance of ethics in decision making for chief officers in the Jamaican Government working with the Jamaican Civil Aviation Authority.

SHANNON BOWEN

Lecture on the importance of employee engagement and new methods of internal listening to employees during a pandemic crisis; building a stronger team ethic in the digital workforce. Link

 KIM THOMPSON, FEILI TU-KEEFNER and TRAVIS WAGNER (iSchool Ph.D. candidate)

Kim Thompson was invited by National Chung Hsing University to present an 18-hour (1 credit) short course about qualitative research methods. She invited Feili Tu-Keefner (iSchool faculty) and Travis Wagner (iSchool Doctoral Candidate) to provide guest lectures about their qualitative research projects and experiences. 25 students attended the course, including graduate students, faculty, researchers, and practitioners. Building upon connections between the CIC and the National Chung Hsing University's Graduate Institute, this invited speaking engagement highlighted ethical and practical aspects of qualitative research for emerging and established researchers. Professor Thompson's short course provided participants with hands-on training for designing, performing, evaluating, and writing qualitative research. Guest lectures were provided by iSchool qualitative researcher Dr. Feili Tu-Keefner and doctoral candidate Travis Wagner.

AWARDS AND GRANTS

ANLIE XIAO and HOLLY OVERTON
This paper won the 2nd place award from the Media Ethics Division of AEJMC 2021.

Citation: Overton. H., & Xiao, A. (2021). Always Let Your Conscience Be Your Guide: Analyzing Moral Conviction, Perceived Motives, and Organization-Public Relationships in Corporate Social Advocacy Efforts. Paper accepted at the 2021 Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication Conference, Public Relations Division, virtual.

Abstract: This study conducts an online survey (N = 267) to examine the role of moral conviction as a predictor of organization-public relationships (OPR) in the context of corporate social advocacy (CSA). Four types of attributions are examined as a mediating variable. Results indicate that moral congruency between an individual and an organization directly leads to stronger trust and power balance and that moral conviction positively predicts all four OPR dimensions through values-driven attributions. Implications are discussed. 

CARL CICCARELLI (Ph.D. student) and BROOKE MCKEEVER
The proposed research project, "Media Advocacy and the Health Belief Model in the Context of COVID-19: A Mixed Methods Study" was one of three recipients of the inaugural AEJMC Collaborative Scholar grant award for student-led and faculty mentored research. The AEJMC Collaborative Scholar Research Program was created by past AEJMC President, Marie Hardin. The competitive program awards grants to research projects involving a graduate student and faculty partnership. The end project of the collaborative scholar grant will be presented at the 2022 AEJMC conference.

Abstract: The COVID-19 pandemic has had tragic and disproportionate effects on Black, Indigenous, and People of Color (BIPOC) communities across the United States. This study aims to apply a mixed method approach to investigate health beliefs related to COVID-19 as well as media framing and agenda-setting or agenda-building techniques used in communication about COVID-19 and related topics. The proposed study will include a survey and content analysis. The survey will gather data from a representative sample of adults within the U.S. to gather information on variables informed by the Health Belief Model (HBM). Participants will also be asked about their media consumption and trust related to various sources of COVID-19 information. A subsequent content analysis will be based on the concept of media advocacy, which consists of three steps: 1) setting the agenda; 2) framing the issue; 3) suggesting solutions. Using mixed methods will reveal important information about health attitudes, intentions, the media advocacy process related to health information in the current media environment, and how factors like race, ethnicity, and trust intersect with these issues. The anticipated results will help inform journalism and mass communication research about the role race and ethnicity play in information behaviors during a health crisis. It will also inform media and health communicators about how to better inform and communicate with BIPOC communities related to important health issues. Link


CONFERENCE PAPERS

CARL CICCARELLI (Ph.D. student)
A research project titled, "A Critical Qualitative Analysis of Response Framing of the COVID-19 Pandemic Across Higher Education," was accepted by the Graduate Student Interest Group (GSIG) for presentation at the AEJMC 2021 conference as part of a panel titled, "Pandemic Coping and Expressing Emotions." Presentations will occur virtually as part of the AEJMC conference on Thursday, August 5, from 3:00-4:30 pm CST.

Abstract: The present study is timely and aims to employ a mixed method research design to extract meaningful insights to inform future practices in higher education through studying responses from a sample of five large public universities located in the southeast United States. This analysis will include in-depth interviews, content analysis of statistical COVID-19 dashboard data for each university, and a textual analysis of the framing and tone of response statements disseminated by each university.

EHSAN MOHAMMADI, HOLLY OVERTON, ANLI XIAO and ALIREZA SALAHIRAD
Identifying theories and topics in public relations research over time: A 50-Year Analysis. NCA 107th Annual Convention, November 18-21, 2021, in Seattle, WA. We received very strong comments from the reviewers. here are some of them: "As one who teaches public relations myself, I can see me using this unpublished paper (and hopefully soon-to-be-published paper) as a required reading;" "This is a very comprehensive study of the development of public relations scholarship in the last 50 years. The paper provides highly valuable information on the topic, trend development and theory application of PR studies."

Abstract: This study analyzes research trends in the field of public relations in terms of topic areas, temporal trends, and theoretical applications. A set of 7,266 peer-reviewed journal articles published from 1970-2020 were retrieved from the Communication Source database using advanced thesaurus-based searches. Text mining and network analysis were applied to extract research topics and the appearance of theories in the papers. The analysis revealed 14 research areas that have dominated public relations literature, including corporate social responsibility and relationship management, trust and consumer relationships, public affairs and international public relations, crisis management and persuasion, among others. Emerging research areas include customer engagement, network analysis, and internal communication. The last decade witnessed more use of theory than previous decades in terms of the number of theories used and frequency of their use, evidenced by an increase from 2.4% of articles applying theory in the 1970s to 29.4% in the last decade.


JOURNAL ARTICLES

JUNGMI JUN, SEI-HILL KIM, JIM THRASHER (Arnold School of Public Health), YU-JIN HEO (Ph.D. student), YOOJIN CHO (Arnold School of Public Health)

Citation: Kim, S., Jun, J., Thrasher, J., Heo, Y., & Cho, Y. (2021). News media presentations of heated tobacco products (HTPs): A content analysis of news coverage in South Korea. Journal of Health Communication. https://doi.org/10.1080/10810730.2021.1931988

Abstract: Our content analysis of newspaper and television news stories in South Korea examines the quantity and nature of news about novel heated tobacco products (HTPs), which heat instead of burn tobacco and that manufacturers claim are less harmful than cigarettes. The amount of news coverage peaked when the government introduced new regulations, suggesting that HTP news was driven largely by new policies. Indeed, HTPs were more likely to be presented as a policy rather than a health issue. When it comes to news sources, government agencies and HTP manufacturers were referenced most often in the news. As for benefits of HTPs, news stories focused on reduced harm, greater social acceptability, and convenience, while discussions of drawbacks included potentially being equally or more harmful than cigarettes, the possibility of extensive future regulations, and HTPs’ unknown health effects. Findings suggested that certain journalistic practices, such as relying heavily on established routine sources, focusing on the stories that could attract large audiences, and representing the perspectives of the publishers and the primary audiences, might have affected the nature of HTP discourse.

AMIR KARAMI, RACHANA REDD KADARI, LEKHA PANATI, SIVA PRASAD NOOLI, HARSHINI BHEEMREDDY (Computer Science Master’s Alumnae), and PARISA BOZORGI (Public Health Ph.D. Alumna)

Supported by the UofSC Big Data Health Science Center, ASPIRE, and the Social Science Research grants, this study analyzed ~88,000 users and ~170 million tweets to address: Do Geotagged Users Represent the Twitter Population? This research was published in ISPRS International Journal of Geo-Information(IF:2.239).

Citation: Karami, A.; Kadari, R.R.; Panati, L.; Nooli, S.P.; Bheemreddy, H.; Bozorgi, P. Analysis of Geotagging Behavior: Do Geotagged Users Represent the Twitter Population? ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2021, 10, 373.

Abstract: Twitter’s APIs are now the main data source for social media researchers. A large number of studies have utilized Twitter data for diverse research interests. Twitter users can share their precise real-time location, and Twitter APIs can provide this information as longitude and latitude. These geotagged Twitter data can help to study human activities and movements for different applications. Compared to the mostly small-scale data samples in different domains, such as social science, collecting geotagged data offers large samples. There is a fundamental question about whether geotagged users can represent non-geotagged users. While some studies have investigated the question from different perspectives, they did not investigate profile information and the contents of tweets of geotagged and non-geotagged users. This empirical study addresses this limitation by applying text mining, statistical analysis, and machine learning techniques on Twitter data comprising more than 88,000 users and over 170 million tweets. Our findings show that there is a significant difference (p-value < 0.001) between geotagged and non-geotagged users based on 73% of the features obtained from the users’ profiles and tweets. The features can also help to distinguish between geotagged and non-geotagged users with around 80% accuracy. This research illustrates that geotagged users do not represent the Twitter population.

Link

VANESSA KITZIE

Citation: Barriage, S., Kitzie, V., Floegel, D., & Oltmann, S. (2021). Public library staff perceptions of and experiences with drag queen storytimes. Children & Libraries, 19(2), 14-22.

Link

KIM THOMPSON

This was an invited article for the Australian Library and Information Association magazine, INCITE's supplement on Workforce Diversity. The supplement focuses on issues related to diversity in the library and information sector, including race, culture, and disability. This research project about how library job ads encourage or create barriers to diversity is longitudinal and has been ongoing since 2018. Job advertisements and hiring practices represent an outward reflection of the values and priorities of an information organization and how it sees its service community. This article explores the idea of hurdle wording in job ads that create artificial barriers to job applicants that can stifle diversity. The two coauthors are in Australia. Bec Muir is one of my doctoral students at Charles Sturt University, and Asim Qayyum is a colleague in the School of Information Studies there.

Citation: 1. Muir, R., Qayyum, A., & Thompson K. M. (2021, July/August). Jumping hurdles: ‘Hurdle wording’ and hiring for diversity and inclusion. Incite: Magazine of the Australian Library and Information Association, 42(4), 10-11.

Link


PANELS AND PRESENTATIONS

KATE STEWART (Ph.D. student)
A panel titled, “#InfluenceYou: Exploring the practicality of influencer marketing through public relations research, teaching, and practice,” was accepted to the NCA 107th Annual Convention, November 18-21, 2021, in Seattle, WA.

More information: Influencer marketing has become a growing focus and specialization within the public relations field - from a research perspective, as well as in practice. This panel presentation will focus on presenting an integrated approach to influencer marketing – touching on the best practices, trends, opportunities, and challenges facing researchers, educators, and practitioners in the field. This panel is in collaboration with Dr. Karen Freberg (UofL), Sydney Dotson (Master's Student at UofL), Dr. Brandon Boatwright (Clemson), and Jason Falls (Author, Speaker, Podcast Host).

FEILI TU-KEEFNER
Since 2015, three situation-specific studies examining disaster information dissemination and services provided by public libraries have been conducted by our teams. This presentation covers some of the findings from these three studies. My co-presenters, Denise Lyons (Deputy Director, South Carolina State Library), Caroline Smith (Inclusive Services Consultant, South Carolina State Library), and April Hobbs (Adult Services Librarians, Charleston County Public Library), are iSchool alumnae.

Citation: Tu-Keefner, F., Lyons, D. R., Liu, J., Hobbs, A., & Smith, J. C. (2021). Supporting librarian’s roles in disasters. Paper presented at the New Jersey Library Association Annual Meeting virtual event, June 3 – 4, 2021.

Abstract: Libraries’ information and community services take on heightened importance during emergencies and natural disasters. Following devastating flooding and hurricanes in SC and Texas, a U of SC/SC State Library team addressed the need of providing emergency preparedness, communication, and health resources to help libraries plan for disasters. Participate in an interactive community engagement activity. Learn how access and literacy issues can inform resource offerings and how you can become better prepared for future emergency and weather events.

Link

FEILI TU-KEEFNER

Citation: Tu-Keefner, F., Lyons, D. R., Liu, J., Hobbs, A., & Smith, J. C. (2021). Librarians' roles during emergencies and natural disasters. Paper presented at the American Library Association Annual Conference & Exhibition virtual event, June 23 – 29, 2021.

Abstract: Libraries’ information and community services take on heightened importance during emergencies and natural disasters. Following devastating flooding and hurricanes in South Carolina and Texas, a team from the University of South Carolina’s School of Information and the South Carolina State Library has taken a more concentrated interest in providing emergency preparedness, communication (including crisis communication and social media), and health resources to help libraries and partner agencies better plan for various disasters. Hear how LIS programs and those who provide continuing education can provide the resources and training to strengthen librarians’ abilities to respond in times of crisis. Get a better understanding of how access and literacy issues can inform a library’s potential program and resource offerings. Learn about the findings can better develop leaders at every level, with special emphasis on Inclusive Services and Advocacy, and how the project team’s discoveries and resources to help your community become better prepared for future emergency and weather events.

Learning Objectives:

*Participants will be able to understand the findings from the research and how it applies to decision making for a public library’s disaster planning.

* Participants will be able to learn about and build competencies and skills desirable for staff to develop leaders at every level during crisis events.

* Participants will be able to identify how the project findings support the UN Sustainable Development Goals.

* Participants will be able to learn about the type of communication and resources most important to create in advance of crisis events.

* Participants will have access to resources to help their organizations become better prepared for future emergencies and disasters.

Link

TRAVIS WAGNER (Ph.D. student)
Travis presented at the ASIST Arts and Humanities-SIG Annual Virtual Symposium titled, “How Arts & Humanities Within Information Science Technology Convey Understanding of Justice in Society.” The topic, "Using LGBTQIA+ History and Queer Theory to Inform Audiovisual Archiving Praxis," focused on an ongoing Service-Learning Project working with MLIS students to digitize audiovisual materials of LGBTQIA+ activists in the state of South Carolina.

Link


SPEAKING ENGAGEMENTS

KELLY DAVIS
Kelly Davis was a guest on episode 105 of the podcast, "That Solo Life." She spoke about making the transition from being a public relations agency owner to an instructor.

Link

KIM THOMPSON and ANDREW WAKELEE (MLIS student)
By invitation from the Iran Public Libraries Foundation, we presented a lecture titled, "Extending Public Library Service to Marginalized Groups," for 174 public librarians across Iran. This session focused on information poverty and public libraries and how services can be designed and evaluated using the tripartite model of information access, with a focus on reducing physical, intellectual, and social barriers. It was so much fun! They did Persian closed captioning of the webinar we pre-recorded for them, and then provided simultaneous translation for the Q&A session. This was the second international presentation I have done with Andrew Wakelee (future academic librarian), and he does an amazing job.

Citation: Thompson, K. M. & Wakelee, A. (2021, June 8). Extending public library service to marginalized groups. Virtual seminar for the Iran Public Libraries Foundation. 


STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT

VISUAL COMMUNICATIONS CAPSTONE PORTFOLIO CLASS

Student photography in the Visual Communications capstone portfolio class was featured in the June issue of Columbia Metropolitan Magazine. The student work was selected by the editors as part of a photography contest sponsored by the Talmadge Moore LeGrand Photojournalism Endowed Scholarship Fund. You can see the students’ award-winning work and article by Van Kornegay.

AWARDS AND GRANTS

VANESSA KITZIE and TRAVIS WAGNER
Awarded an ALISE community conn@CT Mini Grant for a "proposal that will use a community-engaged approach to address a library and information need of a social justice organization." Our project, “Creating Sustainable Digital Spaces for Sharing Health Information with South Carolina Transgender and Non-binary Communities,” plans to use the ALISE Community conn@CT Mini Grant funding to help South Carolina-based transgender and non-binary individuals produce a long-term, digital space in which to produce and share up-to-date information regarding trans-affirming healthcare resources. Our community partner is the Harriet Hancock LGBTQIA+ Community Center in Columbia, South Carolina. As one reviewer noted, I think this project's significance to social justice efforts in LIS is immense, especially within the conservative state of South Carolina where such healthcare is not considered a priority for religious and political reasons. This proposal not only offers the trans and non-binary citizens of South Carolina the opportunity to have a repository of healthcare information relative to their needs but also gives the alumni of this LIS program the opportunity to give their time and services to advocate for this marginalized population. The project offers the opportunity for community members to weigh in through focus groups of the most needed information and the best way for the information to be presented to those who need it. Link

CHRISTINA MYERS (Ph.D. student) and LINWAN WU
Second place top faculty paper in the Minorities and Communication Division of AEJMC.

Citation: Myers, C. & Wu, L. (2021 August). Music of generations: Expressions of the Black experience from Civil Rights to Black Lives Matter. Paper accepted to present at 2021 AEJMC Annual Conference, New Orleans, LA (Minorities and Communication Division).

Abstract: This study investigates the topics expressed by Black musicians during 1960-1969 and 2010-2020 to determine the predominate narratives that arise through their songs as well as employs a comparative analysis to determine similarities and differences in narratives during the two time periods. LDA-based topic modeling analysis indicated seven topic categories were present in the song lyrics – ‘Love/Relationships,’ ‘God/Religion/Spirituality,’ ‘Social/Activities,’ ‘Wealth/Status,’ ‘Sex/Sexual Desire,’ ‘Social/Political Issues’ and ‘Alcohol/Drugs/Substance Use.’

CHRISTINA MYERS (Ph.D. student)
Recipient of the Guido Stempel Award for receiving the top paper score in the AEJMC Graduate Student Interest Group.

Citation: Myers, C. L. (2021). Toward a conceptual model of implicit racial bias and representation of African Americans in mass media. AEJMC National Conference, New Orleans, LA (Graduate Student Interest Group).

Abstract: The paper proposes a conceptual model to explain how societal, cultural and historical circumstances contribute to the creation of meaning assigned by content creators and its subsequent understanding, particularly as it relates to the media’s portrayal of African Americans. The author suggests implicit racial bias, stereotypes and ideology allow for inherently prejudiced belief systems to be disseminated and reinforced by mass media.

BRETT ROBERTSON
Winner of the 2021 International Communication Association (ICA) W. Charles Redding Outstanding Dissertation Award in Organizational Communication

Citation: Robertson, B. W. (2020). Developing resilience through communication and community: Natural disaster preparedness in retirement communities [Doctoral dissertation]. 

KATE STEWART (Ph.D. student)
A paper written for Dr. Robert McKeever's spring 2021 Communication Research Design course, “The new media normal: Survey-based study of COVID-19 effects on motivations to consume non-news media,” won first place in the Moeller Student Paper Competition for the AEJMC Mass Communication and Society Division. This paper will be presented on August 6, 2021 in the 5-6:30 p.m. session.

More information: This study surveyed a general U.S. population to understand how one’s consumption of non-news mass media was affected by the COVID-19 pandemic in relation to social escapism, social presence, and coping mechanisms. The results show that people went to non-news mass media to fulfill the ideas of escaping their current reality, creating a sense of social presence, and aiding in how they cope with situations. The pandemic increased the relationship between consuming non-news mass media for social escapism and social presence but did not affect the relationship with coping mechanisms.


CONFERENCE PAPERS

ROBERT MCKEEVER and HOLLY OVERTON
Citation: Waddell, T. F., Overton, H. K., & McKeever, R. (2021, August). Does sample source matter for theory? Testing model invariance with the influence of presumed influence model across Amazon Mechanical Turk and Qualtrics panels. AEJMC Annual Conference, New Orleans, LA (Communication Theory and Methods Division).

LINWAN WU and TAYLOR WEN
Citation: Wu, L., & Wen, T. J. (2021 August). Bridging the academic-practitioner divide in AI advertising: Analysis of articles in advertising trade publications. Paper accepted to present at 2021 AEJMC Annual Conference, New Orleans, LA (Communication Technology Division).

Abstract: In this study, we explored the practitioner perspective of AI advertising by analyzing the articles that mention AI and its related terms from an important advertising trade publication. A computational analysis of natural language processing discovered five salient topics from these articles, including “platform/companies leverage AI in business,” “AI powers content creation,” “AI battles against human wrongdoing,” “using AI for consumer marketing,” and “exhibiting AI-involved work/cases.” We compared these topics with the existing scholarly research of AI advertising and identified the gap between academic and practitioner perspectives. Implications of this study to both researchers and professionals are discussed.

ALI ZAIN (Ph.D. student)
Citation: Zain, A. (2021, August). Using theory of planned behavior, and operationalization of political partisanship and belief in misinformation to predict individuals’ intentions to quit social media. AEJMC Annual Conference, New Orleans, LA (Communication Technology Division).

Abstract: This study uses the theory of planned behavior to predict individuals’ intentions to quit social media. Attitude, subjective norms and perceived behavioral control significantly predicted intentions to quit social media, accounting for 68 percent of variance among participants (N = 525) representing the US census data. Political partisanship and belief in misinformation were also slightly increasing predictability of the TPB, indicating that they can be used as moderators or antecedents of subjective norms in the future.

ALI ZAIN (Ph.D. student)
Citation: Zain, A. (2021, August). Celebrity capital and social movements: A textual analysis of Bollywood celebrities’ tweets on 2020–21 Indian farmers’ protest. AEJMC Annual Conference 2021 (AEJMC ’21), New Orleans, LA (Cultural and Critical Studies Division).

Abstract: Building on the global trend of celebrity activism and concept of celebrity capital, this study qualitatively examines Twitter posts of Bollywood celebrities about 2020-21 Indian farmers’ protest to discover the dominant themes of favoring and opposing discourses. It was found pro-farmer celebrities used rhetorical and explanatory support while others employed celebrity capital as political support to government to oppose protesters and their supporters. Some celebrities even engaged in celebrity-shaming and name-calling in their communications.


JOURNAL ARTICLES AND BOOK REVIEWS

AMIR KARAMI, BRANDON BOOKSTAVER (College of Pharmacy), MELISSA NOLAN (Arnold School of Public Health) and PARISA BOZORGI (DHEC)
Supported by the UofSC COVID-19 Research Initiative grant, this research collected a large number of published papers representing COVID-19 research. This study found highly frequent manifestations and therapeutic chemicals, representing the importance of the two biomedical concepts. This study also identified associations between diseases, symptoms, medications, and chemicals. This work is based on a collaboration between the School of Information Science, College of Pharmacy, and Arnold School of Public Health.

Citation: Karami, A., Bookstaver, B., Nolan, M., & Bozorgi, P. (2021). Investigating diseases and chemicals in COVID-19 literature with text mining. International Journal of Information Management Data Insights, 100016.

Abstract: Given the rapidly unfolding nature of the COVID-19 pandemic, there is an urgent need to streamline the literature synthesis of the growing scientific research to elucidate targeted solutions. Traditional systematic literature review studies have restrictions, including analyzing a limited number of papers, having various biases, being time-consuming and labor-intensive, focusing on a few topics, and lack of data-driven tools. This research has collected 9298 papers representing COVID-19 research published through May 5, 2020. We used frequency analysis to find highly frequent manifestations and therapeutic chemicals, representing the importance of the two biomedical concepts. This study also applied topic modeling that provided 25 categories showing associations between the two overarching categories. This study is beneficial to researchers for obtaining a macro-level picture of literature, to educators for knowing the scope of literature, and to policymakers and funding agencies for creating scientific strategic plans regarding COVID-19. Link

ROBERT MCKEEVER, ERIK COLLIINS and GEAH PRESSGROVE (Ph.D. alumna)
Citation: Pressgrove, G., McKeever, R., & Collins, E.L. (2021). Effectiveness of persuasive frames in advocacy videos. Public Relations Review. 47(4), 102060. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pubrev.2021.102060

Abstract: Using a three-condition, between-subjects experimental design (N = 152), this study investigates the persuasive effects of fear and humor in nonprofit advocacy-style videos. Findings indicate both fear and humor positively affect a behavioral willingness to change behaviors. Mediation analysis of the antecedent variables in the theory of planned behavior model also revealed significant indirect effects of each form of appeal through attitudes. Findings advance current conceptual and practical understanding of the persuasive power of nonprofit advocacy-style videos.

LINWAN WU and TAYLOR WEN
Citation: Wu, L., Dodoo, N. A., Wen, T. J., & Ke, L. (2021). Understanding Twitter conversations about Artificial Intelligence in advertising based on natural language processing. International Journal of Advertising. DOI: 10.1080/02650487.2021.1920218

Abstract: Artificial intelligence (AI) has been widely applied in the advertising industry and attracted increasing attention from advertising scholars. However, the general public’s perceptions of AI in advertising have been relatively neglected within the current literature. In this study, we analyzed people’s posts on Twitter about AI in advertising using natural language processing. Specifically, we conducted topic modeling and sentiment analysis in the Python environment to identify the most salient topics on this issue and the sentiment of these topics. We discovered that what people posted on Twitter about AI in advertising fell into eight different clusters, with the most positive topic being “AI-powered marketing tools” and the most negative topic being “AI’s involvement in social media campaigns.” We believe the findings of this study provide meaningful implications for academic research of AI advertising as well as the implementation of AI in advertising practice. Link

CHRISTINA MYERS (Ph.D. student)
Citation: Myers, C. L. (2021). Review of the book, Racialism and the Media: Black Jesus, Black Twitter and the First Black American President, by Venise T. Berry. Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly


PANELS AND PRESENTATIONS

VANESSA KITZIE, DOM FRANCIS (Arnold School of Public Health) and NICK VERA (Ph.D. student)
Citation: Kitzie, V., Francis, D., & Vera, N. (2021, June 9). Community health workers & medical librarians promoting health in LGBTQIA+ communities. South Central Region of the National Library of Medicine webinar.

Abstract: This presentation will overview their unique model for LGBTQIA+ health promotion that partners medical librarians with community health workers (CHWs) to facilitate information creation, seeking, use, and sharing within LGBTQIA+ communities. The project is a collaborative effort between the University of South Carolina iSchool and the Arnold School of Public Health’s Center for Community Health Alignment (CCHA). It is funded by an IMLS National Leadership grant. Vanessa Kitzie, Ph.D., Assistant Professor at UofSC iSchool, will report on findings informed by interviews and focus groups with over 70 LGBTQIA+ individuals describing how they create, seek, use, and share health information despite significant barriers and challenges. She will highlight how these health information practices parallel the work of CHWs, who serve as critical points of support and access for health information and resources within their communities. Dom Francis, MPH, Training Coordinator for CCHA, will overview an interdisciplinary training initiative currently being developed to train LGBTQIA+ community leaders to become CHWs. He will address how to strategically partner with medical librarians to facilitate this training. For this initiative, medical librarians will assist CHWs with a specific project: creating an informational resource for the CHWs' LGBTQIA+ community. Nick Vera, MLIS, Ph.D. Student at UofSC iSchool, will highlight lessons learned, with broad implications for librarians when establishing partnerships with LGBTQIA+ communities. Link

KIM THOMPSON and ANDREW WAKELEE (MLIS student)
We were invited by the Honduras Library Association (ABIDH) and the Nicaragua Library Association (ANIBIPA) to present ideas for libraries and archives that might help them continue to offer service during quarantine shut-downs and social distancing. We focused on "fair use" intellectual property concerns, open access resources, curbside service, and the policies and protocols needed to ensure safe and responsible information services in the community. This relates to my research about physical, intellectual, and social digital and information access. We talked about how this tripartite model can be used for decision making during pandemic adjustments to information services. We did the presentation in Spanish and had a marvelous time! We had 76 participants from Honduras, Nicaragua, Guatemala, and Costa Rica on Zoom, and then they also streamed the session via Facebook Live.

Citation: Thompson, K. M. & Wakelee, A. (2021, May 27). Servicios que se pueden ofrecer desde las bibliotecas en tiempo de emergencia (incluyendo pandemia)/Library services during times of emergency (including pandemics) [live webinar] (in Spanish). National Library Association of Honduras (ABIDH) and Nicaragua Library Association (ANIBIPA).

AWARDS AND GRANTS

JUNGMI JUN and TAYLOR WEN

Jungmi Jun and Taylor Wen received an ASPIRE - I grant ($15,000) from the Office of the Vice President for Research their project, "Biometric Responses and Health Outcomes of Youth Exposure to Modified Exposure Claims for Novel Tobacco Products with FDA Authorization Cues." Mary Anne Fitzpatrick and Jim Thrasher (Arnold School of Public Health) will also join the project as mentors.

Abstract: IQOS (a heated tobacco product manufactured by Philip Morris International) became the first tobacco product authorized by the FDA to market itself as ‘modified exposure’ to substances. One of the key tobacco control concerns is that youth may misinterpret the FDA’s ‘modified exposure’ marketing order as a signal from the FDA that IQOS poses ‘modified risk’ to its users’ health and initiate tobacco use with this product. We will investigate biometric responses (visual attention, physiological arousal, facial expressions and cognitive engagement indicated by eye/face movement, galvanic skin activity and electroencephalography) and health outcomes (perceived risk, interest, and trial intent indicated by self-reported survey responses) of youth’s exposure to marketing claims for novel tobacco products with FDA authorization cues. We will conduct a computer-based experiment with a 2 (FDA authorization cues vs. no cues) X 2 (modified exposure vs. modified risk claim) X 2 (IQOS vs. e-cigarettes) between-subjects design.

AMIR KARAMI and LIAM HEIN (College of Nursing)

Amir Karami and Liam Hein (College of Nursing) received an ASPIRE - I grant ($15,000) from the Office of the Vice President for Research for a research titled, “LGBT Health Surveillance via Mining Social Media Big Data”

Abstract: Although there are millions of transgender people in the world, a lack of information exists about their health issues. This issue has consequences for the medical field, which only has a nascent understanding of how to identify and meet this population’s health-related needs. Social media sites like Twitter provide new opportunities for transgender people to overcome these barriers by sharing their personal health experiences. This project employs a framework using both computational and human coding to analyze Twitter data of self-identified LGBT users and detect their health issues.

LINWAN WU

Linwan Wu received an ASPIRE - I grant ($15,000) from the Office of the Vice President for Research for a project titled, “Understanding the Impacts of Social Density and Environmental Uncertainty on Consumers’ Subjective Well-being.”

JEFF WILLIAMS

Jeff Williams received a Beyond the Classroom Engagement Program Grant ($12,000) for Student Participation from the Center for Integrative and Experiential Learning.

Details: The grant will be used to help students in need attend the Maymester at the Circus course in Atlanta, where they will be fully immersed in a course focused on content creation. There will be two industry professionals working alongside me to deliver content and an experience similar to what a professional content creator would encounter in the professional environment. New concepts, trends, and techniques will be taught and discovered. This grant helps pay for housing, program fees and additional expenses associated with studying outside of the traditional classroom and an environment focused only on the creative side of the advertising and content creation industry.  

BROOKE MCKEEVER

Through UofSC’s Prevention Research Center, I will be working on a new grant from the CDC ($499,985) with public health faculty, Shan Qiao, Banky Olatosi, Xiaoming Li, and Sara Wilcox, to promote confidence and improve access to COVID-19 vaccines in South Carolina.

Federal Project Title and Agency: Connecting Behavioral Science to COVID-19 Vaccine Demand (CBS-CVD) Network, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

CREATIVE PRODUCTION

VAN KORNEGAY

Columbian’s Need for Speed – an article and photo essay by Van Kornegay appeared in the March issue of Columbia Metropolitan magazine. Van does freelance journalism and photography for print and online media whenever he gets the chance. This is his second article this academic year for Columbia Metropolitan. The other features aerial views of Columbia (see links below). His drone photography was also featured in an exhibit at 701 Gallery in the fall.


JOURNAL ARTICLES

 SABRINA HABIB

This collaborative research was done by a team from three countries: the U.S., U.K., and Australia to compare leadership styles in advertising among these countries. This is the fourth study published by the team on the topic of leadership in advertising.

Citation: Padmini Patwardhan, Gayle Kerr, Hemant Patwardhan, Louise Kelly, Sabrina Habib, Kathleen Mortimer & Sally Laurie (2021) Ad Agency Leadership in the US, UK, and Australia: A Mixed-Method Analysis of Effective Attributes and Styles, Journal of Advertising. DOI: 10.1080/00913367.2021.1891159

Abstract: Unlike the extensive scholarship on leadership in related disciplines, research on leadership in advertising is almost nonexistent. This study investigates practitioner views on attributes and styles of effective agency leaders in the US, UK, and Australia using GLOBE’s (Global Leadership and Organizational Behavior Effectiveness) Culturally Endorsed Leadership Theory. All three regions are part of GLOBE’s Anglo cultural cluster. The research examines whether the theory’s central proposition—that leadership in global contexts has universally endorsed elements but is also culturally contingent—is valid in an advertising setting. Using a mixed-method approach, data were collected from agency staff and leaders via 255 survey responses and 40 in-depth interviews. Findings indicate that the best leaders are seen as people-focused, collaboration-driven, and future-oriented. Integrity, vision, and inspiration are top leadership attributes, with collaborative and performance-oriented leadership styles considered the most effective. Views were fairly consistent across regions, with some nuanced differences. One interesting difference from main GLOBE findings is the emphasis on soft skills as a core component of effective leadership. Future research should examine this further, as well as the relationship between leadership and agency culture, millennial and gender differences, and leadership training challenges and also examine advertising leadership across other GLOBE cultural clusters. Link

JUNGMI JUN, BONGKI HOO (School of Social Work Faculty), JOONK YOUNG KIM (Ph.D. alumna) and NANLAN ZHANG (Ph.D. student)

Citation: Jun, J., Woo, B., Kim, J., Kim, P., & Zhang, N. (2021). Asian Americans’ communicative response to COVID-19 racism in application of co-cultural theory. Howard Journal of Communications. DOI:10.1080/10646175.2021.1922103

Abstract: Early news coverage of COVID-19 influenced public suspicions of Asians as being the origin and carriers of the disease, and stigmatizing and racist terms (e.g., “Kung flu”, “Chinese virus”, “Wuhan virus”) have been improperly used to refer to the virus. The racist rhetoric, accompanied by increasing verbal and physical attacks, has impacted the lives of Asian Americans during the pandemic. The present study investigates targeted Asian Americans’ communication responding to the aggressors of COVID-19 racism in application of co-cultural communication theory. Targeted individuals’ characteristics and previous experience of racial discrimination are tested as determinants of such communicative responses. Data come from 242 Asians across the U.S. who reported having experienced racism during the COVID-19 pandemic. Among the three identified types of communication responses, the nonassertive approach was used most intensively by Asian Americans in responding to COVID-19 racism, followed by the assertive and aggressive ones. Salient ethnic identity and previous discrimination experience were associated with a higher level of nonassertive and a lower level of aggressive approach. Males were more likely to practice assertive approaches. Our findings contribute to the extension of the co-cultural communication framework in explaining Asian Americans’ communicative responses to pandemic-fueled racism. 

AMIR KARAMI, ALICIA DAHL (Ph.D. alumna, Arnold School of Public Health), GEORGE SHAW, JR. (Ph.D. alumnus, School of Information Science), SRUTHI PUTHAN VALAPPIL (MS alumna, Department of Computer Science and Engineering), GABRIELLE TURNER-MCGRIEVY (Arnold School of Public Health) and PARISA BOZORGI (Ph.D. student, Arnold School of Public Health)

Supported by Advanced Support for Innovative Research Excellence (ASPIRE) grant from the Office of the Vice President for Research and the Big Data Health Science Center (BDHSC), this research was published in Healthcare (IF: 1.916).

Citation: Karami, A., Dahl, A. A., Shaw, G., Valappil, S. P., Turner-McGrievy, G., Kharrazi, H., & Bozorgi, P. (2021). Analysis of Social Media Discussions on (#)Diet by Blue, Red, and Swing States in the U.S. Healthcare, 9(5), 518. doi:10.3390/healthcare9050518

Abstract: The relationship between political affiliations and diet-related discussions on social media has not been studied on a population level. This study used a cost- and -time effective framework to leverage, aggregate, and analyze data from social media. This paper enhances our understanding of diet-related discussions with respect to political orientations in U.S. states. This mixed methods study used computational methods to collect tweets containing “diet” or “#diet” shared in a year, identified tweets posted by U.S. Twitter users, disclosed topics of tweets, and compared democratic, republican, and swing states based on the weight of topics. A qualitative method was employed to code topics. We found 32 unique topics extracted from more than 800,000 tweets, including a wide range of themes, such as diet types and chronic conditions. Based on the comparative analysis of the topic weights, our results revealed a significant difference between democratic, republican, and swing states. The largest difference was detected between swing and democratic states, and the smallest difference was identified between swing and republican states. Our study provides initial insight on the association of potential political leanings with health (e.g., dietary behaviors). Our results show diet discussions differ depending on the political orientation of the state in which Twitter users reside. Understanding the correlation of dietary preferences based on political orientation can help develop targeted and effective health promotion, communication, and policymaking strategies. Link

VANESSA KITZIE

Citation: Kaskazi, A. & Kitzie, V. (2021). Engagement at the margins: Investigating how marginalized teens use digital media for political participation. New Media & Society.

Abstract: This study investigates the information and participatory political practices of marginalized youth via four focus groups with 23 teens (aged 13–17 years) from two geographically distinct regions of the United States to address this limited understanding. The findings indicate that teens encounter political information and news from members of their social networks via digital media more than legacy media outlets, because it enables them to assert agency over social and political issues to which they feel connected. Furthermore, teens identify a tension between viewing adults, specifically teachers and politicians, as authoritative yet untrustworthy information sources, which can lead to their use of digital media to verify or challenge what adults are telling them. Finally, teens must navigate the sociotechnical challenges of digital media, including exposure to unwanted information and the potential social backlash of posting content that could be considered by others to represent slacktivism.

Link

TAYLOR WEN, ROBERT MCKEEVER, JO-YUN LI and JOON KYOUNG KIM (Ph.D. alumni)

Citation: Li, J-Y., Wen, T., McKeever, R., & Kim, J. K. (2021) Uncertainty and Negative Emotions in Parental Decision-making on Childhood Vaccinations: Extending the Theory of Planned Behavior to the Context of Conflicting Health Information, Journal of Health Communication. DOI: 10.1080/10810730.2021.1913677

Abstract: Delaying childhood vaccinations has become a public health threat. Numerous studies have shown that the proliferation of conflicting information about the health effects of childhood vaccinations leads parents to believe misinformation about the outcomes of these vaccinations. To build upon the limited understanding of how conflicting information affects decision-making of health protective behaviors, this study extends and applies the theory of planned behavior (TPB) in the context of childhood vaccinations. This study integrates perceived uncertainty as an antecedent of the TPB model, and incudes the negative emotions resulting from uncertainty as a parallel predictor for the model to examine parents’ acceptance of and engagement in childhood vaccinations. Drawing from a survey of parents in the United States (N = 405), we found that both perceived uncertainty and subjective norms are strong predictors of parents’ attitudes and perceived control regarding childhood vaccinations. Additionally, our study also proved that affective factors and the other three cognitive components in TPB are equally important on the formation of parents’ intentions of childhood vaccinations. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed in this study.

TAYLOR WEN and JO-YUN LI (Ph.D. alumna)

Citation: Wen, T.J., Li, J.-Y. and Song, B. (2021). Does public segmentation matter in crisis communication? The interplay between public segmentation and crisis response strategies. Corporate Communications: An International Journal.

Abstract: Purpose: This study situates in the context of Chipotle's food safety issue and seeks to understand how their primary customers perceive their crisis response messages after learning of the outbreaks. The current study incorporates the framework of situational crisis communication theory (SCCT; Coombs, 2007) and public segmentation model (Rawlins, 2006) to understand the effectiveness of crisis response messages. It aims to examine the role of public segmentation in situational crisis communication and investigate the effects of three crisis response strategies according to SCCT on different public segments. Design/methodology/approach: The SCCT provides guidelines for understanding the effectiveness of different crisis response strategies. The current study showcases the importance of public segmentation in the SCCT model through the lens of stakeholder theory. A 3 (crisis response strategy: deny, diminish, rebuild) × 4 (public segment: advocate, dormant, adversarial, apathetic) factorial experiment was conducted. Findings: The findings suggest that the advocate public expressed more positive evaluation about the company when exposed to rebuild and deny strategies. Both dormant and adversarial stakeholders reported positive responses on rebuild and diminish strategies. However, no difference was found among the apathetic public. Originality/value: The researchers attempt to make a modest contribution in this direction by reporting results from an empirical experiment that examined the effects of crisis response strategies on different public segments. The findings suggest an effective message tailoring approach to target different public segments. Thus, the results of this study are expected to benefit relevant corporations and public relations practitioners.

Link

TAYLOR WEN

Citation: Song, B., Tao, W., & Wen, T. J. (2021). Building consumer communal relationships through cause‐related marketing: From the perspective of persuasion knowledge. Journal of Consumer Behaviour. DOI: 10.1002/cb.1942

Abstract: This study investigates the value of cause‐related marketing (CRM) campaigns in consumer relationship management. Specifically, following the tenets of persuasion knowledge model and equity theory, this study proposes that the effect of consumers' inferences of companies' manipulative intent (IMI) in CRM campaigns on consumer–brand communal relationships is contingent on consumers' knowledge about the degree to which the companies and the social cause benefit from the campaigns. A panel of 506 U.S. consumers was recruited to complete an online survey. Results reveal that when consumers believe that nonprofit partners benefit more from a CRM campaign than the company does, IMI positively affects consumer–brand communal relationships. However, when consumers perceive greater corporate benefits than social benefits, IMI negatively affects consumer–brand communal relationships. These results present a convincing case that in order to cultivate a long‐term communal relationship with consumers, companies should promote their CRM programs by highlighting these programs' social benefits and impact. If such programs are considered to yield more corporate benefits, companies should make efforts to mitigate the negative impact that IMI may bring to consumer–brand communal relationships. This study also advances our existing understanding of communal relationships and CRM by unveiling how CRM‐related factors collectively influence corporate building of a long‐term communal relationship with consumers. We hope to inspire future researchers who are interested in bridging CRM and communal relationship literature to inform effective CRM practice.

Link

LINWAN WU and HOLLY OVERTON

Citation: Wu, L., & Overton, H. (2021). Examining native CSR advertising as a post-crisis response strategy. International Journal of Advertising. DOI: 10.1080/02650487.2021.1914445

Abstract: Although companies have started to adopt native CSR advertising for crisis communication, no existing research has examined this new phenomenon. To fill the gap, this study tested how crisis type and ad identification influence the effectiveness of native CSR advertising as a post-crisis response strategy. An online experiment was conducted using a nationally representative sample of U.S. adults. The results indicated that perceived manipulativeness was the underlying mechanism of how ad identification impaired consumer responses. Crisis type affected advertising effectiveness through consumers’ attributions of crisis responsibility and values-driven CSR motive. More importantly, ad identification significantly impaired consumers’ attitudes toward a native CSR advertisement and their intention to share the advertisement in the victim crisis condition, but not in the accidental or intentional crisis condition. These findings provide meaningful contributions to both the research and practice of CSR advertising.

Link


SPEAKING ENGAGEMENTS

ERIC ROBINSON

Eric P. Robinson was the featured guest on the April 2020 episode of The Lineup, the monthly video newsmagazine of the South Carolina Criminal Justice Academy. He spoke to host Irvin A. Walker about the issues regarding law enforcement officers using social media.

ERIC ROBINSON

Eric Robinson was interviewed by UofSC Social Media Specialist and SJMC MMC Graduate Student Lakeyia Brown on, "How Free is Speech on Social Media?" as part of the USC Libraries' "Live at the Library" series.

AWARDS AND GRANTS

ANLI XIAO

Communicating CSA with supporters and opponents: Exploring the extended Social Identity Model of Collective Action and the role of identity. This proposal won a 2021 Page Center Legacy Scholar Grant ($2,500).

Abstract: When communicating about corporate social advocacy (CSA), companies’ stances on controversial issues attract supportive consumers, while at the same time potentially alienating those who are on the opposing side of the issue. Thus, it is critical that CSA messages not only motivate supporters, but also minimize alienating effects among opponents. This project proposes two studies. Study 1 (N = 700) is a 2 (message frame: moral violation vs. moral fit) x 2 (bandwagon cue: high vs. low) experiment that adopts the extended Social Identity Model of Collective Action (SIMCA) and investigates why people support CSA and how companies should communicate their CSA effort to further mobilize supporters. Study 2 (N = 700) is a 2 (cause opponent group identity: high vs. low) x 2 (portrayed identity in CSA message: issue-affected group identity vs. national identity) experiment that focuses on how companies should communicate their CSA to opponents to alleviate negative effects. In study 1 it is expected that people’s support for CSA will be predicted by politicized identity, group efficacy and group-based anger. A CSA message using the moral violation frame with high bandwagon cues will show stronger positive effect on dependent variables. In study 2 it is expected that people with a salient issue-relevant identity will be less likely to support the cause. However, the negative impact may be lessened by viewing a CSA message portraying a national identity instead of the identity of the group affected by the issue. This project provides important implications for understanding publics’ support for CSA and minimizing potential CSA backlash.

DANTE MOZIE (SJMC Doctoral Student)

I presented "They Killin' Us For No Reason: Black Lives Matter, Police Brutality and Hip-Hop Music: A Quantitative Content Analysis at the 2021 AEJMC Midwinter Conference. This paper earned the conference's Top Abstract Award for the Entertainment Studies Interest Group. The research found a statistically significant correlation between the anger that hip-hop artists expressed over the 2020 killings of George Floyd and others and less respect for conventional institutions, such as the police and the government, as well as a statistically significant correlation between those feelings of anger and a desire to retaliate. This may support Unnever and Gabbidon's (2011) African-American Offending Theory, which suggests that African-Americans who have been subject to racism or discrimination may have a detachment from conventional institutions, and may be more likely to offend or seek retaliation as a result of their anger over being discriminated against.

Citation: Mozie, D. (2021, March 5-6). "They Killin’ Us For No Reason": Black Lives Matter, Police Brutality, and Hip-Hop Music – A Quantitative Content Analysis [Conference presentation]. AEJMC Midwinter Conference, Norman, OK, United States.

MINHEE CHOI (Ph.D. alumna) and BROOKE MCKEEVER

We received a Top Paper Award from the Health Communication Division of the International Communication Association (ICA).

Citation: Choi, M., McKeever, B.W. (2021, May). Gun violence and advocacy communication. Researchaccepted for presentation at the International Communication Association (ICA) Conference. *Top Paper Award from Health Communication Division

Abstract: As gun violence has been a major threat to the United States in recent decades, this study used an experiment (N=331) to test the strategic value of public health framing through different formats (single vs. competitive) and certain types of hashtags (call-to-action vs. policy) as part of social media advocacy communication, including how those elements may lead to attitudinal responses related to gun-related policies. Findings show that public health framing is an effective message strategy to influence individuals’ attitudes on gun-related policies. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed.


CONFERENCE PAPERS

SHANNON BOWEN

Citation: Neill, M. S., & Bowen, S. A. (2021, March). Employee perceptions of ethical listening in U.S. organizations. Paper presented at the International Public Relations Research Conference; virtual presentation due to pandemic. *University of Florida Employee Communication Top Paper Research Award

More information: Women feel less listened to in their organizations than do men, regardless of their rank; employees may be hesitant to share "bad news" or complain due to fear of management response. Acknowledgment: Funded by a grant from the Arthur W. Page Center for Public Integrity at Penn State University.

VANESSA KITZIE

Paper presented at iConference 2021 and also published in conference proceedings

Citations:

Proceedings: Lookingbill, V., Vera, A.N., Wagner, T.L., & Kitzie, V. (2021). “We can be our best alliance:” Resilient health information practices of LGBTQIA+ individuals as buffering response to minority stress. In K. Toeppe, H. Yan, & S.K.W. Chu (Eds.), Diversity, divergence, dialogue: 16th International Conference, iConference 2021, virtual, March 17-31, 2021, Proceedings Part II (pp. 3-13). Switzerland, AG: Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-71305-8_1.

Paper presentation: Lookingbill, V., Vera, A.N., Wagner, T.L., & Kitzie, V. (2020, March). “We can be our best alliance”: Resilient health information practices of LGBTQIA+ individuals as buffering response to minority stress. Paper presented at iConference 2021 (Conference held online due to COVID-19).

Abstract: This article examines the resilient health information practices of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, intersex, and asexual (LGBTQIA+) individuals as agentic forms of buffering against minority stressors. Informed by semi-structured interviews with 30 LGBTQIA+ community leaders from South Carolina, our findings demonstrate how LGBTQIA+ individuals engage in resilient health information practices and community-based resilience. Further, our findings suggest that LGBTQIA+ communities integrate externally produced stressors. These findings have implications for future research on minority stress and resiliency strategies, such as shifting from outreach to engagement and leveraging what communities are doing, rather than assuming they are lacking. Further, as each identity and intersecting identities under the LGBTQIA+ umbrella has unique stressors and resilience strategies, our findings indicate how resilience strategies operate across each level of the socio-ecological model to better inform understanding of health information in context.


CREATIVE PRODUCTION

JASON PORTER

Let’s Get A Job is a weekly podcast where Jason, a seasoned creative-turned-educator, talks with creative professionals about what they do, how they got their first jobs and the things they wish they knew when they did. Let's Get A Job is available to stream on all streaming platforms. Published Episodes in March:

  • 03/01 - Talking Wedding Photography with Lauren Jonas
  • 03/08 - Talking Augmented Reality with Alex Lang
  • 03/15 - Talking Sports Photography in the NFL with Tori Richman
  • 03/22 - Talking Freelance with Jessica Hische, Lettering Artist and Author
  • 03/28 - Talking Editorial Art Direction with Chelsea Lee

Links: Apple Podcasts

Google Podcasts

More information: Let's Get A Job, a podcast developed for VisCom portfolio students, is the podcast I wish I had when I was in college: a deep discussion digging into the "how and why" of creative industries as told by the folks in them. More than practical career advice, it’s a look behind the curtain revealing a story of shared journeys, spectacular failures, horrible clients, and dreams fulfilled.


JOURNAL ARTICLES

SHANNON BOWEN

Citation: Neill, M. S. & Bowen, S. A. (2021). Ethical listening to employees during a pandemic: New approaches, barriers and lessons. Journal of Communication Management, 25(1), ahead of print. https://doi: 10.1108/JCOM-09-2020-0103

Abstract: Purpose – The purpose of this study was to identify new challenges to organizational listening posed by a global pandemic and how organizations are overcoming those barriers. Design/methodology/approach – The researchers conducted 30 in-depth interviews with US communication management professionals. Findings – Communication management professionals value listening, but do not always make it the priority that it merits. They listed lack of desire of senior management, time, and trust of employees as barriers to effective organizational listening. The global COVID pandemic has made it more challenging to connect to employees working remotely and to observe nonverbal cues that are essential in communication. Organizations are adapting by using more frequent pulse surveys, video conferencing technology and mobile applications. Most importantly, this pandemic has enhanced moral sensitivity and empathy leading organizations to make decisions based on ethical considerations. Research limitations/implications – The researchers examined organizational listening, applying employee-organization relationships (EOR) theory and found that trust is essential. Trust can be enhanced through building relationships with employees, ethical listening and closing the feedback loop by communicating how employers are using the feedback received by employees to make a positive change. Practical implications – Communication managers need to place a higher priority on listening to employees. Their listening efforts need to be authentic, morally autonomous or open-minded, and empathetic to respect the genuine concerns of employees and how organizational decisions will affect them. Listening is essential to serving as an ethical and effective strategic counselor. Originality/value – The study examines organizational listening in the context of a global pandemic. Keywords Ethics, Internal communication, Trust, Communication management Paper type Research paper

Acknowledgment: Funded by a grant from the Arthur W. Page Center for Public Integrity at Penn State University

Link

NICOLE COOKE and VANESSA KITZIE

Citation: Cooke, N.A. & Kitzie, V. (2021). Outsiders-within-LIS: Reprioritizing the marginalized in critical sociocultural work [Special issue, “Paradigm Shift in the Field of Information”]. Journal of the Association for Information Science and Technology (JASIS&T), Eds. R. Tang, B. Mehra, J.T. Du, & Y. Zhao. https://doi.org/10.1002/asi.24449.

Abstract: While there are calls for new paradigms within the profession, there are also existing subgenres that fit this bill if they would be fully acknowledged. This essay argues that underrepresented and otherwise marginalized scholars have already produced significant work within social, cultural, and community‐oriented paradigms; social justice and advocacy; and diversity, equity, and inclusion. This work has not been sufficiently valued or promoted. Furthermore, the surrounding structural conditions have resulted in the dismissal, violently reviewed and rejected, and erased work of underrepresented scholars, and the stigmatization and delegitimization of their work. These scholars are “outsiders‐within‐LIS.” By identifying the outsiders‐within‐LIS through the frame of standpoint theories, the authors are suggesting that a new paradigm does not need to be created; rather, an existing paradigm needs to be recognized and reprioritized. This reprioritized paradigm of critical sociocultural work has and will continue to creatively enrich and expand the field and decolonize LIS curricula.

LUCY GREEN

The article, "Advocacy is Loud and Uncomfortable," was published in the Winter 2021 issue of The ALAN Review, the journal for the Assembly on Literature for Adolescents of the National Council of Teachers of English. The article was co-written with high school English teacher, Corey Green. The article briefly discusses student voice issues surrounding queer K-12 educators and students, including school librarians, and the way these issues inform their work and their definition of professional advocacy.

Citation: Green, L., & Green, C. (2021). Advocacy is loud and uncomfortable. The ALAN Review, 48(2), 121-124. Link

JUNGMI JUN and BONGKI WOO (School of Social Work)

Citation: Woo, B., & Jun, J. (2021). COVID-19 racial discrimination and depressive symptoms among Asians in the United States: Does communication about the incident matter? Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health. DOI: 10.1007/s10903-021-01167-x

Abstract: Since the outbreak of COVID-19, Asians in the US have experienced a spike of racism. The goal of this paper is to examine the association between racial discrimination amid COVID-19 pandemic and depressive symptoms among Asian subgroups and to test whether communications about the incident with various sources moderate this relationship. Data come from an online survey conducted among 245 Asian Americans. Multiple linear regression analyses were conducted. COVID-19 racial discrimination was positively associated with depressive symptoms, and this association did not vary between Chinese Americans and other Asian subgroups. Communications with a spouse/partner buffered the mental burden of racial discrimination. Those who shared their experience in online ethnic communities displayed stronger depressive symptoms than who did not. These results suggest the potential benefit of communication with a spouse/partner in mitigating the mental burden of discrimination and call for more online mental health support for Asians.

Link

ROBERT MCKEEVER and BROOKE MCKEEVER

Citation: Rhodes, M. E., Sundstrom, B., Ritter, E., McKeever, B. W., & McKeever, R. (2020). Preparing for A COVID-19 Vaccine: A Mixed Methods Study of Vaccine Hesitant Parents. Journal of Health Communication, 25(10), 831–837. Link

Abstract: This study investigated vaccine acceptance of putative COVID-19 vaccines among a national sample of vaccine hesitant parents. Vaccine hesitancy and politicization of vaccine development has led to a pronounced distrust of COVID-19 vaccines in the U.S. A total of 1,381 vaccine-hesitant parents participated in this study. Participants indicated a general unwillingness to vaccinate their children (M = 3.55, SD = 2.13) and themselves (M = 3.58, SD = 2.16) when a COVID-19 vaccine becomes available. More educated parents were more likely to plan to vaccinate themselves [F(5, 533) = 9.93, p < .05] and their children [F(5, 533) = 10.278, p < .05]. Understanding vaccine hesitant parents offers crucial insights as a COVID-19 vaccine becomes available for the general public and as we wait for a vaccine to be approved for pediatric use. 

AMANDA REED (iSchool alumna) and KIM THOMPSON

Citation: Reed, A., & Thompson, K. M. (2021). Never waste a crisis: Digital inclusion for sustainable development in the context of the COVID pandemic. Library Journal (China), 40(2), 14-16.

More information: Invited by Library Journal (of China) to write a reaction to a recent International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions (2019) statement on the importance of libraries in supporting digital inclusion, particularly during COVID-19 social restrictions, I invited alumna Amanda Reed (iSchool, 2019) to co-author and provide examples from Richland Library as a case study of how public libraries in the US are responding to COVID digital divides. The article was part of an ensemble of 10 short pieces and was published in both English and Chinese. This is Amanda's first publication!

LINWAN WU

Citation: Yang, J., Jiang, M., & Wu, L. (2021). Native advertising in WeChat Official Accounts: How do ad-content congruence and ad skepticism influence advertising value and effectiveness? Journal of Interactive Advertising.

Abstract: WeChat Official Accounts, subscription-based accounts that broadcast information to followers, have become a popular venue for native advertising in China. This study investigated the effects of individuals’ ad skepticism and ad-content congruence on native advertising effectiveness in WeChat Official Accounts, as well as the mediating role of advertising value on the interaction effect of ad skepticism and ad-content congruence. Results showed that ad skepticism negatively influenced perceived ad effectiveness. Ad-content congruence positively influenced perceived ad effectiveness only for individuals with high ad skepticism, because they perceived more advertising value in congruent native ads than incongruent native ads.

Link

LINWAN WU and TAYLOR WEN

Citation: Wu, L., & Wen, T. J. (2021). Understanding AI Advertising from the Consumer Perspective: What Factors Determine Consumer Appreciation of AI-Created Advertisements? Journal of Advertising Research. DOI: 10.2501/JAR-2021-004

Abstract: In recent years, artificial intelligence (AI) technology has been used to create advertising messages. This study examined the factors that influence consumers’ overall appreciation of AI-created advertisements. The findings indicate that, in addition to its direct effect on consumer reactions to AI-created advertisements, consumers’ perceived objectivity of the general advertisement creation process positively influences machine heuristic—a rule of thumb that machines are more secure and trustworthy than humans. This effect boosted consumer appreciation of AI-created advertisements. Consumers’ perceived objectivity of advertisement creation negatively influenced perceived eeriness of AI advertising, which jeopardized consumer appreciation of AI-created advertisements. Consumers’ feelings of uneasiness with robots were found to have a positive influence on both machine heuristic and perceived eeriness of AI advertising.

Link 


SPEAKING ENGAGEMENTS

SHANNON BOWEN

Virtual seminar for members of the Arthur W. Page Society and Page Up: Ethics and Leadership in Managing Pandemic and Crisis Response: New Research Findings and Paths. New research was shared for best practices on pandemic response via leadership, ethics, and crisis management. Improving stakeholder relationships of various types was discussed.

ERIC ROBINSON

I spoke on “The First Amendment & Public Relations” to the South Carolina Chapter of the Public Relations Society of America (PRSA). I discussed how the First Amendment and legal principles of free speech apply to public relations activities.

Citation: Robinson. E. (2021, Mar. 11). “The First Amendment & Public Relations,” South Carolina Chapter, Public Relations Society of America (PRSA), online.


OTHER RECOGNITION

KELLY DAVIS

The Public Relations Society of America's College of Fellows has appointed Kelly Davis, APR, Fellow PRSA to serve as one of its two representatives on the Commission for Public Relations Education. She joins her colleague, Dr. Shannon Bowen, a longtime member of the commission. The CPRE's mission is to advance excellence in public relations education and the industry worldwide.

KIM THOMPSON and CLAYTON COPELAND

ACRL Distance and Online Learning Section Research & Publications Committee selected a 2020 article by Kim Thompson and Clayton Copeland entitled "Inclusive Considerations for Optimal Online Learning in Times of Disasters and Crises" to list as one of their Top 5 for inclusivity.  Link

Citation: Thompson, K. M. & Copeland, C. A. (2020). Inclusive considerations for optimal online learning in times of disasters and crises. Information and Learning Sciences, Special Issue: A Response to Emergency Transitions to Remote Online Education in K-12 and Higher Education, 121(7/8), 481-486. DOI 10.1108/ILS-04-2020-0083

Link

AWARDS AND BADGES

KIRSTIN PELLIZZARO

My paper, "Reporting from My Home: Location Effect on the Para-Social Phenomenon and the News Broadcast Industry," was accepted to BEA2021 and is the 1st place winner in the News Division open paper competition.

Citation: Pellizzaro, K. & Liseblad, M. (2021, April 12-16). Reporting from My Home: Location Effect on the Para-Social Phenomenon and the News Broadcast Industry. Paper presentation, Broadcast Education Association (BEA) 2021, Virtual Conference.

Abstract: The current pandemic has created a unique opportunity to study news broadcasting in different formats as many broadcasters report from home versus the studio. Using the well-established Para-Social phenomenon, this study attempts to determine a change in audience effect depending on whether the news anchor is working from home or the studio. Using a between-group experiment, the study examines Para-Social Interaction and Para-Social Relationship in a single viewing event. Further, the study tests Para-Social Interaction and Para-Social Relationship in an extended viewing experience. The findings lead to a discussion of possible new broadcasting structures that could lead to cost-saving measures.

SABRINA HABIB

Received Adobe Creative Educator Level 1. In order to achieve the Adobe Educator badge, I attended two Adobe Creative Campus conferences and successfully completed a course, Creativity for All, which requires submission of creative works to be approved by Adobe. The Adobe Creative Educator program is a community that empowers educators who inspire creativity for the next generation.

CHRISTINA MYERS (Ph.D. student)

Her research, "Beyond the Lens: Black Professional Athletes on Race, Racism & the Realities of Breathing While Black," was selected as the Top Abstract for the Minorities and Communication Division to be presented at the 2021 AEJMC Midwinter Conference. Depictions of the African American experience in sports, music and television and the implications of implicit racial bias, stereotypes and ideology on mass media's representations.

Citation: Myers, C. L. (2021, March 5-6). Beyond the Lens: Black Professional Athletes on Race, Racism & the Realities of Breathing While Black. Paper accepted for presentation at the AEJMC Midwinter Conference, Norman, OK (Minorities and Communication Division).

ANLI XIAO and HOLLY OVERTON

Recipients of the Arthur W. Page Center Benchmarking Award at the International Public Relations Research Conference.

Citation: Xiao, A., & Overton, H.K. (2021, March). Supporting Corporate Social Advocacy through Collective Action: The Role of Shared Group Anger, Efficacy, and Politicized Identity. Paper accepted for presentation at the International Public Relations Research Annual Conference, Orlando, FL (now virtual).

HOLLY OVERTON

First Place Research Paper in the Debut Category at the Broadcasting Education Association conference.

Citation: Yang, F., & Overton, H.K. (2021, April). What if Unmotivated is More Dangerous? The Motivation-Contingent Effectiveness of Misinformation Correction on Social Media. Paper accepted for presentation the Broadcast Education Association Annual Conference, Las Vegas, NV (now virtual). *First Place Research Paper in the Debut Category.

Abstract: This study examines the effect of misinformation correction on social media, contingent on the motivational factors heightened by social media when users are strongly opinionated. A 2 (uncertainty: low vs. high) x 2 (risk: low vs. high) x 2 (personal relevance: low vs. high) x 2 (attitudinal congruence with correction: incongruent vs. congruent) pre-test and post-test factorial online experiment was conducted to examine the effectiveness of correction while controlling for misinformation source credibility. Findings suggest that correction is effective in decreasing social media users’ perceived credibility and sharing intention towards misinformation even when they are polarized on the issue of the misinformation. Interestingly, while this research study confirms previous literature that users are biased towards pro-attitudinal correction sources than counter-attitudinal ones, misinformation correction is also significantly more effective in decreasing perceived credibility and sharing intention when users are motivated by the personal relevance, uncertainty, and risks associated with the misinformation.

SHANNON BOWEN

Won the University of Florida Employee Communication Research Award ($1,000 prize).

Note: I am on the Board of Directors and so I will not accept this prize money but will accept the certificate of recognition.

Citation: Neill, M. S., & Bowen, S. A. (2021, March). Employee perceptions of ethical listening in U.S. organizations. Paper presented at the International Public Relations Research Conference, virtual presentation. *University of Florida Employee Communication Research Award

Extended Abstract: In a time of disruption due to the pandemic, listening to internal stakeholders could not be more essential, or more challenging, due to new barriers such as working remotely and restrictions on large gatherings. We conducted an online survey with 300 U.S. employees in July of 2020 to examine employees’ perceptions regarding perceptions of effectiveness and satisfaction with their employer’s listening efforts. Macnamara (2016) recommended that ethical listening should involve seven canons of listening including “giving recognition to others” and treating them with respect, acknowledging others’ views and perspectives in a timely manner, paying attention to others and interpreting what they have to say as fairly and openly as possible, trying to understand others’ views, perspectives, and feelings; giving appropriate consideration to what others say, and responding in an appropriate way (p. 151). Using internal communication research, ethics, listening literature, and relationship theory as our framework, we examined employees’ perceptions’ regarding transparency, communication, and Employee-Organization Relationship (EOR). Through statistical analyses, we found that women rated their organization’s overall listening lower (M=3.22, SD=1.274) as compared to men (M=3.68, SD=1.135), t(297)=3.281, p=.001; non-managers rated their organization’s overall listening lower (M=3.04, SD=1.234) compared to managers (M=4.08, SD=.918), t(298)=-7.858, p=.000. In addition, women were less likely to agree that they personally felt listened to (M=3.35, SD=1.285) compared to men (M=3.80, SD=1.208), t(297)=3.133, p=.002, and non-managers were less likely to agree that they personally felt listened to (M=3.15, SD=1.31) when compared with managers (M=4.21, SD=.869), t(298)=-7.783, p=.000. The item “My organization really listens to what people like me have to say” had a particularly strong dip from women (M=3.25, SD=1.27), indicating that a gender discrepancy among management, as found by prior researchers, is likely to still exist and impact perceptions. Employees rated meetings with their supervisors the highest for effectiveness followed by departmental meetings. Employers need to evaluate the resources they dedicate to listening as well as their processes for analyzing the feedback they receive from employees and then close the feedback loop by implementing appropriate changes based on that feedback. They also need to do a better job of communicating to employees that they are listening and how they are implementing recommendations. These issues need to be addressed, because they can lead to disengagement and a decline in trust (Macnamara, 2016). Due to the findings of our survey, employers need to give extra attention to listening to the concerns of women and non-managers. One area that managers may need to work on is their people listening style (PLS), which involves a concern for others’ feelings and emotions; women evaluated themselves and other women peers higher in this area than male colleagues (Sargent & Weaver, III, 2003) . This type of listening is consistent with scholars’ conception of ethical listening, which includes respect for others, as well as trying to understand their point of view and feelings. The state of ethical listening in U.S. companies and organizations needs immediate attention. Specific deficiencies include a lack of employee training in data collection/analysis, and a lack of time and resources to ensure the information is shared internally.


CONFERENCE PAPERS

CHRISTINA MYERS (Ph.D. student)

Depictions of the African American experience in sports, music and television and the implications of implicit racial bias, stereotypes and ideology on mass media's representations.

Citation: Myers, C. L. (2021, March 5-6). Toward a Conceptual Model of Implicit Racial Bias and Representation of African Americans in Mass Media. Paper accepted for presentation at the AEJMC Midwinter Conference, Norman, OK (Graduate Student Division).

CHRISTINA MYERS and CARMEN LANDY (Ph.D. students)

Citation: Myers, C.L., Landy, C. (2021, March 5-6). The Impact of Black Identity and Parasocial Interaction with Black Celebrities on Activism and Social Issues. Paper accepted for presentation at the AEJMC Midwinter Conference, Norman, OK (Minorities and Communication Division).

HOLLY OVERTON, JOON KYOUNG KIM (Ph.D. alumnus), JACKSON CARTER (Ph.D. student), KHALID ALHARBI (Ph.D. student), NANDINI BHALLA (Ph.D. alumna)

Conference paper accepted at a top international conference. This study offers insights for companies to determine when and how to speak out about social-political issues. This study also adds clarity to the psychological determinants of individuals’ support of CSA by reinforcing that attitudes toward corporate social advocacy (CSA) and subjective norms guide their actions. Findings also suggest that companies should consider aligning their CSA messaging with different stakeholder groups and target certain efforts to younger generations who appear to be the most receptive of their efforts.

Citation: Kim, J.K., Overton, H.K., Carter, J.E., Alharbi, K., & Bhalla, N. (2021, May). Examining the Psychological Determinants of Consumer Support for Corporate Social Advocacy. Paper accepted for presentation at the International Communication Division Annual Conference, Public Relations Division, Denver CO (now virtual).

ANLI XIAO and HOLLY OVERTON

This research was supported through a grant from the Glen M. Broom Center for Professional Development in Public Relations. It is the first of three studies funded by the grant.

Citation: Xiao, A., & Overton, H.K. (2021, March). Supporting Corporate Social Advocacy through Collective Action: The Role of Shared Group Anger, Efficacy, and Politicized Identity. Paper accepted for presentation at the International Public Relations Research Annual Conference, Orlando, FL (now virtual).

Abstract: This study examines Corporate Social Advocacy (CSA) as a form of collective action that is motivated by individuals’ shared group efficacy, anger, and politicized identity. Adopting the Social Identity Model of Collective Action, this online survey (N = 273) found that shared group efficacy with the company led to higher intention to participate in CSA, engaging in PWOM, and providing financial support for the CSA cause. Individuals’ identification with the company and the CSA cause also predicted intention to support CSA and PWOM. Sharing CSA cause-related anger with the company negatively predicted PWOM. Results offer practical advice about how companies can lead and mobilize efforts to enact change.


JOURNAL ARTICLES

JUNGMI JUN, SEI-HILL KIM, JAMES THRASHER (Arnold School of Public Health), Yoojin Cho (Arnold School of Public Health), and YUJIN HEO (Ph.D. student)

Citation: Jun, J., Kim, S., Thrasher, J., Cho, Y. & Heo, Y. (2021). Heated debates on regulations of heated tobacco products in South Korea: The news valence, source, and framing of relative risk/benefit. Tobacco ControlLink

Abstract: We analyze news representations of the regulation of heated tobacco products (HTPs) in South Korea, the country where HTP use is among the highest in the world despite conflicts between the government and the HTP manufacturers. Methods: We analyzed a total of 571 print and TV news covering HTP regulations, published between 2017 and 2018, the time period when HTPs were introduced to the country and various regulations of HTPs were proposed and implemented. We assessed the prevalence and associations among specific types of HTP regulations that were discussed, valence towards regulation, sources, framing of the relative health risks/benefits of HTPs compared with conventional cigarettes. Results: Taxation (55.2%) and warning labels (25.7%) were two regulation topics covered most. Almost equal proportions of pro-regulation (2.5%) and anti-regulation valence (2.2%) were found in taxation-related news, while pro-regulation valence appeared more frequently for other restrictions, including warning labels (pro=9.5% vs anti=1.4%), marketing restrictions (pro=6.9% vs anti=0%) and integration of HTPs into smoke-free policies for cigarettes (pro=8.7% vs anti=0%). The government (59%), followed by the tobacco industry (39.4%), was the source cited most often across news stories while the presence of tobacco control advocates was low (4.9%). As for framing, there was no significant difference in the prevalence of stories mentioning reduced harm (31.7%) and equal or more harm (33.6%) of HTPs compared with cigarettes. Conclusions: We provide implications for governments and tobacco control advocates on building consensus for applying cigarette equivalent taxes and pictorial warning labels to HTPs. Link 

AMIR KARAMI, MORGAN LUNDY (MLIS alumna), FRANK WEBB (SCHC alumnus), GABRIELLE TURNER-MCGRIEVY (Arnold School of Public Health), BROOKE MCKEEVER, and Robert MCKEEVER

With the CIC Internal Collaborative Research Grant, we published a paper at IJERPH (IF: 2.849 & H-index: 92) on developing a framework to identify and analyze health topics shared by Russian trolls between 2012 and 2018. We found that there were not just a few health issues (e.g., vaccines), Russian Trolls polarized Americans on a wide range of health topics.

Citation: Karami, A.; Lundy, M.; Webb, F.; Turner-McGrievy, G.; McKeever, B.W.; McKeever, R. Identifying and Analyzing Health-Related Themes in Disinformation Shared by Conservative and Liberal Russian Trolls on Twitter. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 2021, 18, 2159. Link

Abstract: To combat health disinformation shared online, there is a need to identify and characterize the prevalence of topics shared by trolls managed by individuals to promote discord. The current literature is limited to a few health topics and dominated by vaccination. The goal of this study is to identify and analyze the breadth of health topics discussed by left (liberal) and right (conservative) Russian trolls on Twitter. We introduce an automated framework based on mixed methods including both computational and qualitative techniques. Results suggest that Russian trolls discussed 48 health-related topics, ranging from diet to abortion. Out of the 48 topics, there was a significant difference (p-value ≤ 0.004) between left and right trolls based on 17 topics. Hillary Clinton’s health during the 2016 election was the most popular topic for right trolls, who discussed this topic significantly more than left trolls. Mental health was the most popular topic for left trolls, who discussed this topic significantly more than right trolls. This study shows that health disinformation is a global public health threat on social media for a considerable number of health topics. This study can be beneficial for researchers who are interested in political disinformation and health monitoring, communication, and promotion on social media by showing health information shared by Russian trolls. Link

DENETRA WALKER (Ph.D. student)

Top paper from AEJMC 2020 published in Journalism Practice in 2021.

Citation: Walker, D. (2021). “There’s a Camera Everywhere:” How Citizen Journalists, Cellphones, and Technology Shape Coverage of Police Shootings. Journalism Practice, 1-18.

Abstract: Through the lens of gatekeeping, this study examines how an evolving technological landscape influences the way television news journalists cover the issue of deadly, highly-publicized police shootings in the United States. Through 10 in-depth interviews of television news journalists, the author analyzes how social media, cellphones, and citizen journalists shape this narrative. Themes include a change in speed and accessibility, accuracy, and a multi-layered challenge to police authority. Practical and theoretical implications on the future digital landscape covering this topic are discussed. Link


WEBINARS AND PODCASTS

CLAYTON COPELAND

Citation: Copeland, C. A. & Mallary, K.J. (2021).Crafting accessible learning environments through universal design and Universal Design for Learning [Webinar]. Morgridge College of Education, University of Denver. Colorado, United States.

Abstract: Learners are variable in terms of their interests, lived experiences, needs, and abilities. Universal Design (UD) and Universal Design for Learning (UDL) are invaluable frameworks for creating physical and digital environments that embrace such variability. During this presentation, attendees explored how accessible instruction can support learning. Throughout the session, the facilitators and attendees discussed actionable strategies for implementing the principles of UD and UDL.

HOLLY OVERTON

Holly Overton was featured on a PR podcast, "Ethical Voices," to discuss her research in the areas of Corporate Social Responsibility Communication and Corporate Social Advocacy.  Link

AWARDS & GRANTS

LINWAN WU and TAYLOR WEN

The 2020-2021 American Academy of Advertising Research Fellowship

Citation: Wu, L., Wen, T. J., & Dodoo, N. A. (2021). Disclosing the involvement of Artificial Intelligence in advertising to consumers. $2,500 grant awarded by the American Academy of Advertising Research Fellowship.


BOOK CHAPTERS

AUGIE GRANT and YICHENG ZHU (Ph.D. alumnus)

This study is one of the most comprehensive studies of news consumers across the globe, conducted in 15 countries using nine languages. The chapter reports the relative importance of eight news values and 13 news topics across the 15 countries.

Citation: Wilkinson, J. S., Grant, A. E., Zhu, Y., & Guerrazzi, D. (2020). News values and topics: A 15-nation news consumer perspective. In News Values from an Audience Perspective (pp. 57-77). Palgrave Macmillan, Cham.

Abstract: As the global news environment evolves, differences in news values and topics across nations are observed. This chapter presents analysis from a 15-nation, nine language survey of news consumers’ perceptions of news values and news topics. A total of 1588 responses were collected from respondents in Australia, Brazil, Canada, Chile, China, France, Germany, India, Italy, Mexico, Russia, South Africa, Ukraine, United Kingdom, and the United States. News values of proximity, prominence, and unexpectedness ranked highest, but differences were observed among the nations studied. Respondents expressed the strongest interest in news topics of science/technology, human interest, entertainment, and international affairs. These global and nation-specific findings provide a baseline for newsrooms to consider categories of content that have the greatest interest among local news consumers. Link

JUNGMI JUN, CHANGWON CHOI (Ph.D. student) and JOONKYOUNG KIM (Ph.D. alumnus)

Citation: 2. Jun, J., Choi C., & Kim, J. (2021). Bridging tobacco control advocacy and strategic communication scholarship: Tackling the tobacco industry’s extrinsic corporate social responsibility with strategic networking. In Botan, C. (Eds). The Handbook of Strategic Communication (pp. 334-357). John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

Abstract: Global tobacco companies have continued to develop various types of novel tobacco products and have successfully recruited new tobacco user groups including youth, kids, young adults, and international consumers. Social media has become a critical venue for the tobacco industry to promote novel tobacco products and interfere in tobacco control. This chapter discusses the tobacco industry’s corporate social responsibility (CSR) and pseudo-activism. We propose these areas can be where tobacco control advocacy and strategic communication (SC) scholarship collaborate to counteract the tobacco industry.

KIM THOMPSON and CLAYTON COPELAND

This chapter overviews a model for how to create inclusive courses starting from the design stage.

Citation: Thompson, K. M., & Copeland, C. (2021). Making the diversity, equity, and inclusion mindset indispensable in the LIS classroom through design, content, communication, and assessment. In K. Dali & N. Caidi (Eds.). Humanizing LIS education and practice: Diversity by design (pp. 63-76). Routledge.

Abstract: When we incorporate diversity and inclusion into Library and Information Science course design and content and build communication and learning frameworks in the classroom on inclusive principles, we build a cohort of students who cannot “unsee” these basic principles as they engage in practice. By designing lecture and activity materials that allow students to read and engage with different perspectives about professional values and content, we create opportunities for awareness building and prepare students to engage with the same practices as they join the profession. This chapter provides insights for and examples of how to create courses that bring diversity, equity, and inclusion into its very design.


CONFERENCE PAPERS

YINGYING CHEN

Citation: Chen, Y., (2021, May 27-31). Disaggregating Twitter attention: An automated method to classify Twitter users in climate change issue. 71st Annual International Communication Association Conference, Virtual. 

Abstract: Most current studies about intermedia attention diffusion have treated Twitter as an aggregated form of attention. However, Twitter combines a variety of actors, who collectively shape the flow of issue attention across media. To advance theories about intermedia attention diffusion, it is necessary to disaggregate Twitter users. This study designs and validates an automated method to classify Twitter users into organizational and individual Twitter users, and then further detect news media, politicians, and advocacy organizational accounts. The method effectively classified 288,829 Twitter users involved with four major climate change events into their respective actor categories.

YINGYING CHEN

Citation: Chen, Y., (2021, May 27-31). Intermedia network gatekeeping: Tracing the diffusion of climate change attention in different events. 71st Annual International Communication Association Conference, Virtual. 

Abstract: One of the overriding challenges to studying this phenomenon is to sort out the intertwining, interdependent, and ever-changing relationships between and among an array of actors across multiple different media platforms (i.e., news media, social media, etc.). The study examines the diffusion of attention within the contemporary hybrid media system, particularly the spread of attention within and beyond Twitter surrounding several recent climate change-related events. Findings show organizational actors (i.e., news, political, advocacy, and other organizational actors) still serve as the main source of attention within Twitter; however, these actors do not fully explain all the patterns in the diffusion of climate change attention within and beyond Twitter. Instead, interpersonal communication on Twitter among individual actors and traditional gatekeepers (e.g., news, political actors, large advocacy groups) also helps explain these patterns. To sustain Twitter attention and spread attention to other media platforms requires the integrated efforts of all types of actors.

MINHEE CHOI (Ph.D. alumna) and BROOKE MCKEEVER

Citation: Choi, M., & McKeever, B.W. (2021, May 27-31). Gun violence and advocacy communication. 71st Annual International Communication Association Conference, Virtual. 

Abstract: As gun violence has been a major threat to the United States in recent decades, this study used an experiment (N=331) to test the strategic value of public health framing through different formats (single vs. competitive) and certain types of hashtags (call-to-action vs. policy) as part of social media advocacy communication, including how those elements may lead to attitudinal responses related to gun-related policies. Findings show that public health framing is an effective message strategy to influence individuals’ attitudes on gun-related policies. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed.

JUNGMI JUN, JOONKYOUNG KIM (Ph.D. alumnus), JIM THRASHER (Arnold School of Public Health) and YOOJIN CHO (Arnold School of Public Health)

Citation: Kim, J., Jun, J., Thrasher, J., & Cho, Y. (2021, May 27-31). Predicting young adults’ intention to use IQOS: Theory of planned behavior and technology acceptance model. 71st Annual International Communication Association Conference, Virtual. 

JUNGMI JUN, JOONKYOUNG KIM (Ph.D. alumnus) and BONGKI WOO (School of Social Work)

Citation: Jun, J., Kim, J., Woo, B., (2021, May 27-31). Fight the virus and fight the bias: Predicting Asian Americans’ activism to combat anti-Asian racism during the COVID-19 pandemic. 71st Annual International Communication Association Conference, Virtual. 

TAYLOR WEN

This paper adopts an innovative computational method of decision tree to analyze a large set of advertising-related variables to identify the most decisive attributes that enhance ad persuasiveness.

Citation: Wen, Taylor J., Ching-Hua Chuan, Jing Yang, and Wanhsiu Sunny Tsai (2021, March). Predicting advertising persuasiveness: A decision tree method for understanding emotional (in)congruence of ad placement on YouTube. 2021 American Academy of Advertising (AAA) Annual Conference, Online.

Abstract: By applying the computational method of decision trees, this research identifies the most decisive attributes enhancing ad persuasiveness by examining the contextual effects of emotional (in)congruence on ad placement for music videos on YouTube. Findings of this interdisciplinary research not only integrated key psychological constructs in computational advertising research to predict persuasiveness but also extended the theoretical consideration of contextual (in)congruence into the domain of emotion. Methodologically, this study demonstrates the effectiveness of decision trees in exploratory theory testing. Practically, the predictive results from the decision tree model provide strategic guidance to inform advertising design and evaluation under different conditions.

TAYLOR WEN

This paper adopts computer vision methods to examine the effects of color, visual composition, facial expression, and content labels on consumer behavioral engagement (like number of likes and number of comments) on social media. We not only apply innovative computer vision methods to the advertising context but also examine how these parameters predicted by the computational methods influence consumers' actual behaviors on social media.

Citation: Yang, Jing and Taylor J. Wen (2021, March). Predicting consumer engagement towards social media branded content: A computational visual analysis approach. 2021 American Academy of Advertising (AAA) Annual Conference, Online.

Abstract: Visual-based social media (e.g., Instagram) is now an important segment of brands’ management of consumer engagement. Prior studies examining the message effects in consumer engagement had mostly focused on the textual content, not the visual content. Therefore, the current study extracts various types of visual features (e.g., color, visual composition, facial expression, and content labels) in lifestyle brands’ Instagram imagery posts to explain consumer engagement. Through machine-learning-based predictive modeling, the results revealed key visual features that can influence consumer engagement in the forms of likes and comments. This study aims to provide insightful practical implications and advance extant literature of consumer engagement through the analysis of imagery data. Limitations and future study directions are also discussed.


JOURNAL ARTICLES

YINGYING CHEN

Citation: Thorson, K., Medeiros, M., Cotter, K., Chen, Y., Rodgers, K., Bae, A., & Baykaldi, S. (2020). Platform civics: Facebook in the local information infrastructure. Digital Journalism, 8(10), 1231-1257.

Abstract: Digital platforms are transforming practices of political information production and circulation in local communities. We develop the theoretical concept of local political information infrastructure to draw attention to (1) the broadening array of actors who are producing political information in local communities, in addition to local news media, and (2) the role of network media logics in shaping everyday practices of political information production and circulation. We combine a computational analysis of Facebook posts from news and non-news community actors in a mid-sized Midwestern U.S. city with interviews with communication managers at local non-profits, libraries, local government, and city service organizations in that same case community. Our findings illustrate the ways in which local news media are increasingly displaced from the centre of local political information infrastructures, while Facebook moves to take up a central infrastructural role. We consider the consequences of these shifts for the circulation of politics and policy information in communities. Link

BRETT ROBERTSON

This research explores how digital disaster response volunteers (or what we call, disaster knowledge workers) use private social media as a disaster unfolds to locate people who need to be rescued. We reveal the communicative and coordinating actions these disaster knowledge workers used in helping conduct rescues during the Hurricane Harvey flooding in 2017.

Citation: Smith, W. R., Robertson, B. W., Stephens, K. K., & Murthy, D. (2021). A different type of disaster response volunteer: Looking behind the scenes to reveal coordinating actions of disaster knowledge workers. Journal of Contingencies and Crisis Management. Advance online publication.  Link

Abstract: Researchers have established the prominent role digital volunteers play during crises and disasters. From self‐organizing to annotating public data, these volunteers are now a fixture in disaster research. However, we know much less about how these volunteers function, behind the public scene, when using private social media as a disaster unfolds and people need to be rescued. This qualitative study identified the emergent helping roles along with the skillsets and abilities that helped volunteers perform these behind‐the‐scene roles during the Hurricane Harvey flooding in 2017. Using in‐depth interviews along with captured images in private social media, we find these volunteers resembled organizational knowledge workers. We identify nine specific communicating and coordinating actions that these disaster knowledge workers performed. The contributions of these findings center on implications for disaster response and management.

KIM THOMPSON

This article provides critical content analysis of library job ads in Australia to evaluate how inviting they might be to diverse applicants.

Citation: Muir, R., Thompson, K. M., & Qayyum, A. (2020). The diversity we seek: A document analysis of diversity and inclusion in the Australian LIS sector job advertisements. Journal of the Australian Library and Information Association, 69(4), 473-495.  Link

Abstract: A finding of the 2019 Australian Library and Information Association’s Workforce Diversity Trend Report was that the diversity of Australian communities has not translated to diversity in the library and information science professions. In the wake of this report, we reviewed how Australian library and information science job advertisements discuss and recruit for diversity in their organisations. Drawing from a sample of 208 job advertisements collected from 22 January to 22 February 2019 and 86 job advertisements collected during 22 January to 3 February 2018, and using qualitative and quantitative document analysis, we provide an analysis of how the wording in library and information science job advertisements can specifically invite application from diversity groups including people with a disability, LGBTIQA+, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders, culturally and linguistically diverse groups, age, and by gender.


PANELS & PRESENTATIONS

AUGIE GRANT

Presented "Communication Technology Update 2021" to the 16th Annual TFI Technology Conference, January 21-22, 2021. The disruption caused by the pandemic has accelerated the pace of change in communication technologies, resulting in fundamental changes in consumer and business use of these technologies. This presentation explores these impacts.

Citation: Grant, A. E. (2021, January). Communication Technology Update 2021. 16th Annual TFI Technology Conference, Austin/Virtual.

Abstract: Overview of the latest developments in mass media, consumer electronics, networking, and social media, with special attention to the impacts of the pandemic on work, education, entertainment, ecommerce, and health care.

VANESSA KITZIE

The Future of Trust in the age of the twin pandemics of Covid-19 and Racial Injustice (invited presentation) Moderator: Veronda J. Pitchford. Speakers: Amanda J. Wilson, Vanessa L. Kitzie. American Library Association OnDemand Future of Libraries Session.

Abstract: In study after study, libraries are ranked among the public’s most trusted sources of information. What is the obligation of the library to also build trust? The 2016 American presidential election created a communication and information chasm. Increased mistrust of different beliefs and/or demographics created dissonance and an inability to find common ground. Mistrust accelerated in 2020, when Americans were forced to deal with the twin pandemic impact of Covid-19 and protest response to racial injustice. How do we leverage the trust imbued in libraries to begin filling the communication and information chasm dividing us all?

TAYLOR WEN

As our representative for the Biometrics and User Experiences (BaUX) Lab in CIC, I'm hosting a panel for the American Academy of Advertising (AAA) 2021 annual conference (online), March 18-20. The panel title is, "Translating Consumer Neuroscience into Advertising Research and Education." This panel has several invited scholars and industry professionals who will share their experiences and insights on how we can apply neuroscience knowledge in current advertising research and education.

Citation: Wen, Taylor J., Glenna Read, Saleem Alhabash, Juan Mundel, Jessica Wilson, and Anthony Almond (2021, March). Translating consumer neuroscience into advertising research and education. 2021 American Academy of Advertising (AAA) Annual Conference, Online.

Abstract: Despite the increasing application of consumer neuroscience in advertising research in both academia and industry, many misconceptions about neuroscience research and data persist. One of the challenges for the consumer neuroscience researcher is dispelling these misconceptions for key stakeholders. In this panel, we will address some of these misconceptions with a focus on translating consumer neuroscience knowledge to new biopsychological researchers (i.e., faculty and students) and industry partners. This panel aspires to enhance the accessibility of consumer neuroscience research among advertising scholars in research, teaching, and service. Our expert panelists will discuss topics such as what neuroscience data actually tell us and how it can be used to complement self-report data, conducting web-based biometric research, managing expectations of industry partners, navigating timelines necessary to collect neuroscience data while adhering to important deadlines (such as tenure), and the increasing ease of use and decreasing expense of these measures that will allow more advertising researchers to employ such innovative research approaches.

CONFERENCE PAPERS, PANELS & PRESENTATIONS

BRETT ROBERTSON

Citation: Robertson, B. W. (2020, December). Moving toward sustainable disaster preparedness: Understanding vulnerable populations [Virtual]. Presentation at the Annual Meeting of the Society for Risk Analysis.

Abstract: Improving levels of preparedness for natural disasters is an urgent health priority for older adults because individuals over the age of 65 are less likely to have gathered the necessary emergency supplies before disasters strike. Even though older adults are considered one of the most vulnerable populations in disasters, many remain at the crossroads in making decisions about their personal disaster preparations. This study investigates risk communication predictors that lead older adults to prepare. Many older adults in retirement communities perceive their facility will have emergency supplies, and may not bother to engage in preparedness behaviors. Yet, the reality is that older adults who can prepare should attempt to gather supplies independent of preparations made by their facility, as many facilities may not adapt their emergency plans to account for specific residents’ needs.

LINWAN WU

Citation: Feng, Y., & Wu, L. (2021 March). Commenting on brand posts during a crisis: The relationship between context-induced moods and brand message processing. Paper accepted to present at the 2021 AAA Annual Conference, Online.

Abstract: Within the context of COVID-19, this study examines the impact of context-induced moods on consumers’ processing of two different types of brands posts on social media: profit-driven posts and public-driven posts. Using both social media data (24,578 user comments on 14 brand posts on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter) and survey data (356 subjects recruited from Amazon Mechanical Turk), we found that across all the three social media platforms, negative context-induced moods tend to drive consumers to leave positive comments on a public-driven brand post, supporting the Negative-State Relief Model. By contrast, there is no relationship between context-induced moods and type of comments left on a profit-driven brand post. We discuss theoretical, practical, and methodological implications of this research.

LINWAN WU and TAYLOR WEN

Citation: Wu, L., Dodoo, N. A., & Wen, T. J. (2021 March). Understanding the Twitter conversation about AI in advertising based on natural language processing. Paper accepted to present at the 2021 AAA Annual Conference, Online.

Abstract: Artificial intelligence (AI) has been widely applied in the advertising industry and has attracted increasing attention from advertising scholars. However, the general public’s perceptions of AI in advertising have been relatively neglected in the current literature. In this study, we analyzed people’s posts about AI in advertising on Twitter using natural language processing. Specifically, we conducted topic modeling and sentiment analysis in the Python environment to explore the most salient topics on this issue and the sentiment of these topics. We discovered that what people talk about pertaining to AI in advertising on Twitter has both overlaps and differences compared to what scholars and practitioners are interested in. We believe the findings of this study could provide meaningful implications to academic research of AI advertising as well as the implementation of AI in the advertising practice.

KAREN GAVIGAN

Making Graphic Texts - Symposium session presented at the 2020 Literacy Research Association's virtual conference. Karen was the invited Discussant.

Citation: Botzakis, S, Gavigan, K., Axelrod, D., McGrail, E., & Johnson, C. (December 3, 2020). Making Graphic Texts. (Symposium Session). Literacy Research Association (LRA). Virtual Conference.

Abstract: This symposium elucidates the complex work of creating graphic texts and provides much needed insight into how such texts might be taken up, read, and produced by educators, learners, and researchers. It utilizes a set of new literacies frameworks (Kress, 2010) that attend to semiotics as well as social learning in exploring the complexities of a variety of people, both students and teachers, who have engaged in creating comics in academic contexts.

KAREN GAVIGAN and DANIELLA COOK (UofSC College of Education)

Citation: Cook, D., Gavigan, K., Morton, B., Duke, K. (2020, December 4). Inquiry required: Teaching the long arc of Civil Rights. Poster session presented at the 2020 National Council for the Social Studies (NCSS) virtual conference.

Abstract: Inquiry required: Teaching the long arc of Civil Rights The partners in the Library of Congress Teaching with Primary Sources Civil Rights Fellowship focus on teaching the civil rights movement to K-12 educators, helping them determine foundational concepts and then examining these ideas through a contemporary lens.


JOURNAL ARTICLES

KAREN GAVIGAN

Citation: Gavigan, K.W. (January / February, 2021). Journey for justice: Helping teens visualize the Civil Rights Movement through primary sources and graphic novels. Knowledge Quest: Journal of the American Association of School Librarians. Chicago, IL: American Library Association.

Abstract: This article presents activities for pairing three graphic novels with primary sources to teach the civil rights movement to teens. Reading civil rights-related graphic novels, and reviewing corresponding primary sources, can provide students with a deeper understanding of this tragic time in U.S. history and provoke discussions about racial issues.

VANESSA KITZIE, TRAVIS WAGNER and NICK VERA

Citation: Kitzie, V., Wagner, T. and Vera, A.N. (2021), "Discursive power and resistance in the information world maps of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, intersex and asexual community leaders", Journal of Documentation, Vol. ahead-of-print No. ahead-of-print. Link

Abstract: Purpose: This qualitative study explores how discursive power shapes South Carolina lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, intersex and asexual (LGBTQIA+) communities' health information practices and how participants resist this power. Design/methodology/approach: In total, 28 LGBTQIA+ community leaders from South Carolina engaged in semi-structured interviews and information world mapping–a participatory arts-based elicitation technique–to capture the context underlying how they and their communities create, seek, use and share health information. We focus on the information world maps for this paper, employing situational analysis–a discourse analytic method for visual data–to analyze them. Findings: Six themes emerged describing how discursive power operates both within and outside of LGBTQIA+ communities: (1) producing absence, (2) providing unwanted information, (3) commoditizing LGBTQIA+ communities, (4) condensing LGBTQIA+ people into monoliths; (5) establishing the community's normative role in information practices; (6) applying assimilationist and metronormative discourses to information sources. This power negates people's information practices with less dominant LGBTQIA+ identities and marginalized intersectional identities across locations such as race and class. Participants resisted discursive power within their maps via the following tactics: (1) (re)appropriating discourses and (2) imagining new information worlds. Originality/value: This study captures the perspectives of an understudied population–LGBTQIA+ persons from the American South–about a critical topic–their health–and frames these perspectives and topics within an informational context. Our use of information world mapping and situational analysis offers a unique and still underutilized set of qualitative methods within information science research.

BROOKE MCKEEVER

Examining government communication about the AIDS epidemic in the 1980s reveals parallels and lessons learned for today's communication environment regarding COVID-19.

Citation: McKeever, B.W. (2021). Public relations and public health: The importance of leadership and other lessons learned from “Understanding AIDS” in the 1980s. Public Relations ReviewLink

Abstract: Public Relations Quarterly recognized Surgeon General C. Everett Koop as "Communicator of the Year" in 1988 for his work to inform the public about HIV/AIDS and reframe a then politically charged issue to focus on public health and education. Using a historical perspective, this study examines Koop's communication about AIDS during the 1980s, including press conference remarks, reminiscence notes, and an unprecedented mailing sent to all U.S. households. This study also explores media coverage at the time and framing throughout these materials to determine what lessons can be learned for today’s communication efforts. Two lessons relate to the importance of leadership in media advocacy and prioritizing public health over politics. Parallels are drawn between public relations and health and science communication practice and scholarship, and future research is suggested related to recent government communication surrounding the COVID-19 pandemic. Link


OTHER WRITING & RECOGNITION

KENNETH CAMPBELL

In 2016, only two U.S. daily newspapers endorsed Donald Trump for president while the others either did not endorse or rejected him as unfit for the job. But he won. In 2020, some seven U.S. dailies endorsed him but he lost as newspapers appealed to voters to save the American democracy.

Citation: Campbell, K. (November 2020). Newspaper endorsements, presidential fitness and democracy (essay). In Daniel Jackson, Danielle Sarver Coombs, Filippo Trevisan, Darren Lilleker and Einar Thorsen, eds., U.S. Election Analysis 2020: Media, Voters and the Campaign. Available here

NICOLE COOKE

Cooke is a regular columnist for Publishers Weekly and her latest column is titled, "What It Means to Decolonize the Library."

Citation: Cooke, N. A. (2020, December 18). What It Means to Decolonize the Library. Link

 

2020

AWARDS 

TOM REICHERT
Best conference paper award at the Global Marketing Conference.

Citation: Choi, H., Yoo, K. Y., Reichert, T., & Northup, T. (2020, November 7). Sexual ad appeals in social media: Effects and influences of cultural difference and sexual self-schema. Paper presented at the annual meaning of the Global Marketing Conference, Seoul, Korea.


BOOK CHAPTER

SHANNON BOWEN and NANDINI BHALLA
Peer reviewed book chapter.

Citation: Bowen, S. A. & Bhalla, N. (2020). Ethical theories and public relations: Global issues and challenges. In C. Valentini (Ed.), Public Relations (pp. 581-598). Berlin: De Gruyter. https://doi.org/10.1515/9783110554250-030 

VANESSA KITZIE, NICK VERA and TRAVIS WAGNER

Citation: Vera, A.N., Wagner, T.L. and Kitzie, V.L. (2020), "“When it’s Time to Come Together, We Come Together”: Reconceptualizing Theories of Self-efficacy for Health Information Practices within LGBTQIA+ Communities", Jean, B.S., Jindal, G., Liao, Y. and Jaeger, P.T. (Ed.) Roles and Responsibilities of Libraries in Increasing Consumer Health Literacy and Reducing Health Disparities (Advances in Librarianship, Vol. 47), Emerald Publishing Limited, pp. 263-282. https://doi.org/10.1108/S0065-283020200000047013

Abstract: This chapter addresses the shortcomings of current self-efficacy models describing the health information practices of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, intersex, and asexual (LGBTQIA+) communities. Informed by semi-structured interviews with 30 LGBTQIA+ community leaders from South Carolina, findings demonstrate how their self-efficacy operates beyond HIV/AIDS research while complicating traditional models that isolate an individual’s health information practices from their abundant communal experiences. Findings also suggest that participants engage with health information and resources in ways deemed unhealthy or harmful by healthcare providers. However, such practices are nuanced, and participants carefully navigate them, balancing concerns for community safety and well-being over traditional engagements with healthcare infrastructures. These findings have implications for public and health librarianship when providing LGBTQIA+ communities with health information. Practitioners must comprehend how the collective meanings, values, and lived experiences of LGBTQIA+ communities inform how they create, seek, share, and use health information to engage in successful informational interventions for community health promotion. Otherwise, practitioners risk embracing approaches that apply decontextualized, deficit-based understandings of these health information practices, and lack community relevance. 


CREATIVE PRODUCTION

NICOLE COOKE

The 2020 Baker Fall Forum was held online for 288 people on November 19, 2020. "I'm Still Speaking: Amplifying the Black Experience in LIS" featured five Black librarians in conversation with Nicole A. Cooke, the Augusta Baker Endowed Chair. The panelists - academic, public, and school librarians - shared their candid experiences in the LIS field and offered salient thoughts with non-Black audience members on how they could be better allies and equity-focused citizens of the profession.

Link: https://sites.google.com/view/bakerlectures/webinars

NICOLE COOKE and DENETRA WALKER (SJMC Ph.D. student)

Augusta Baker Chair Dr. Nicole Cooke and communications doctoral student Denetra Walker hosted a Facebook Live discussion on fake news. They discussed their research on misinformation and disinformation and shared tips for combating them.

Link: https://www.facebook.com/67451333976/videos/239636460853453


JOURNAL ARTICLES

EHSAN MOHAMMADI

Evaluating the roles of authors and acknowledging contributions to academic publications is a new challenge in modern collaborative scholarly communication. I have collaborated with a large team around the world to explore ethical, social, and technical problems related to authorship.

Citation: Nicole A. Vasilevsky, Mohammad Hosseini, Samantha Teplitzky, Violeta Ilik, Ehsan Mohammadi, Juliane Schneider, Barbara Kern, Julien Colomb, Scott C. Edmunds, Karen Gutzman, Daniel S. Himmelstein, Marijane White, Britton Smith, Lisa O’Keefe, Melissa Haendel & Kristi L. Holmes (2020) Is authorship sufficient for today’s collaborative research? A call for contributor roles, Accountability in Research(JIF=1.4; H-Index=26; Rank=1st Quartile).

Abstract: Assigning authorship and recognizing contributions to scholarly works is challenging on many levels. Here we discuss ethical, social, and technical challenges to the concept of authorship that may impede the recognition of contributions to a scholarly work. Recent work in the field of authorship shows that shifting to a more inclusive contributorship approach may address these challenges. Recent efforts to enable better recognition of contributions to scholarship include the development of the Contributor Role Ontology (CRO), which extends the CRediT taxonomy and can be used in information systems for structuring contributions. We also introduce the Contributor Attribution Model (CAM), which provides a simple data model that relates the contributor to research objects via the role that they played, as well as the provenance of the information. Finally, requirements for the adoption of a contributorship-based approach are discussed.

Link: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/08989621.2020.1779591

EHSAN MOHAMMADI

Research outputs in wine studies have changed in the recent decade and it can be related to wine production and consumption. the amount of published wine research was strongly correlated with wine production for Old World countries, there was no correlation for New World countries.

Citation: Steel, C., Jamali, H. R., & Mohammadi, E. (2020). Wine research and its relationship with wine production: A scientometric analysis of global trends. Australian Journal of Grape and Wine Research. (JIF=3.1; H-Index=67; Rank=1stQuartile)

Abstract: The economic value of wine has increased over the years due to the emergence of new producers and new markets. In line with this, the global distribution of research outputs in viticulture and oenology has also shifted since this informs wine production and consumption. This study investigates the trends in wine and grape publications indexed in Web of Science (2002–2017). Methods and Results: Using bibliometric techniques, citation impact, research specialisation and collaboration network were analysed. China had the largest annual growth in wine‐related publications, Spain had the largest total number of wine‐related publications and the USA had the highest citation impact. Australia was the sixth in terms of publication share and fifth in terms of citation share. European countries collaborate mostly with one another and Portuguese and Spanish speaking countries form another collaboration cluster. Wine and grape science is a diverse field with food science and technology scholars being the main contributors and funding coming mostly from governments agencies. Conclusions: Scientific collaboration in the field does not closely follow the grouping of countries into Old and New World wine producers. While the amount of published wine research was strongly correlated with wine production for Old World countries, there was no correlation for New World countries. Significance of the Study: This study improves the search strategy for retrieving wine and grape research from scholarly databases. It also provides an up‐to‐date account of global wine research trends.

Link: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/ajgw.12422

EHSAN MOHAMMADI

We don’t know who shares academic papers on Facebook. This study revealed that most Facebook users who share health and medical papers on Facebook are non‐academics. This suggests that public Facebook posts linking to health‐related articles are mostly used to facilitate scientific knowledge flow between non‐academic professionals and the public. Therefore, Facebook mention counts may be a combined academic and non‐academic attention indicator in the health and medical domains.

Citation: Mohammadi, E., Barahmand, N., & Thelwall, M. (2020). Who shares health and medical scholarly articles on Facebook? Learned Publishing, 33(2), 111–118. (JIF= 2.2; H-Index= 28; Acceptance Rate=50%; Rank=1st Quartile)

Abstract: Over a million journal articles had been shared on public Facebook pages by 2017, but little is known about who is sharing (posting links to) these papers and whether mention counts could be an impact indicator. This study classified users who had posted about 749 links on Facebook before October 2017 mentioning 500 medical and health‐related research articles, obtained using altmetric.com data. Most accounts (68%) belonged to groups, including online communities, journals, academic organizations, and societies. Of individual profiles, academics accounted for only 4%, but the largest group were health care professionals (16%). More than half (58%) of all Facebook accounts examined were not academic. The non‐academic dominance suggests that public Facebook posts linking to health‐related articles are mostly used to facilitate scientific knowledge flow between non‐academic professionals and the public. Therefore, Facebook mention counts may be a combined academic and non‐academic attention indicator in the health and medical domains.

Link: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1002/leap.1271

EHSAN MOHAMMADI and AMIR KARAMI

Big data has been a prevalent topic in different academic disciplines. However, the scope and structure of big data across disciplines have not been studied. My co-author and I applied text mining methods to explore research trends across all academic disciplines between 2012 and 2017. This study provided evidence of the influence of big data in academic fields such as education, urban informatics, business, health and medical sciences.

Citation: Mohammadi E, Karami A. Exploring research trends in big data across disciplines: A text mining analysis. Journal of Information Science. August 2020.

Abstract: Using big data has been a prevailing research trend in various academic fields. However, no studies have explored the scope and structure of big data across disciplines. In this article, we applied topic modeling and word co-occurrence analysis methods to identify key topics from more than 36,000 big data publications across all academic disciplines between 2012 and 2017. The results revealed several topics associated with the storage, collection and analysis of large datasets; the publications were predominantly published in computational fields. Other identified research topics show the influence of big data methods and techniques in areas beyond computer science, such as education, urban informatics, business, health and medical sciences. In fact, the prevalence of these topics has increased over time. In contrast, some themes like parallel computing, network modeling and big data analytic techniques have lost their popularity in recent years. These results probably reflect the maturity of big data core topics and highlight flourishing new research trends pertinent to big data in new domains, especially in social sciences, health and medicine. Findings of this article can be beneficial for researchers and science policymakers to understand the scope and structure of big data in different academic disciplines.

Link: https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/0165551520932855

EHSAN MOHAMMADI and KARL GREGORY (Department of Statistics)

What are the topics of research publications shared on Facebook? The fields Science and Technology, General and Internal Medicine, Complementary and Alternative Medicine, and Sport Sciences received more attention on Facebook than average.

Citation: Mohammadi, E., Gregory, K. B., Thelwall, M., & Barahmand, N. (2020). Which health and biomedical topics generate the most Facebook interest and the strongest citation relationships? Information Processing & Management, 57(3), 102230.

Abstract: Although more than a million academic papers have been posted on Facebook, there is little detailed research about which fields or cross-field issues are involved and whether there are field or public interest relationships between Facebook mentions and future citations. In response, we identified health and biomedical scientific papers mentioned on Facebook and assigned subjects to them using the MeSH and Science Metrix journal classification schema. Multistage adaptive LASSO and unpenalized least-squares regressions were used to model Facebook mentions by fields and MeSH terms. The fields Science and Technology, General and Internal Medicine, Complementary and Alternative Medicine, and Sport Sciences produced higher Facebook mention counts than average. However, no MeSH cross-field issue differences were found in the rate of attracting Facebook mentions. The relationship between Facebook mentions and citations varies between both fields and MeSH cross-field issues. General and Internal Medicine, Cardiovascular System and Hematology and Developmental Biology have the strongest correlations between Facebook mentions and citations, probably due to high citation rates and high Facebook visibility in these areas.

Link: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0306457319311124

TOM REICHERT

Citation: Cummins, G. R., Gong, Z., & Reichert, T. (2020). The impact of visual sexual appeals on attention allocation with advertisements: An eye-tracking study. International Journal of Advertising, DOI: 10.1080/02650487.2020.1772656

TOM REICHERT

Citation: Choi, H., Yoo, K., Reichert, T., & Northup, T. (2020). Feminism and advertising: Responses to sexual ads featuring women: How the differential influence of feminist perspectives can inform targeting strategies. Journal of Advertising Research, 60(2).

Link: http://www.journalofadvertisingresearch.com/content/60/2/163.abstract


PANELS AND OTHER RECOGNITION

KAREN GAVIGAN

Webinar presented on November 24, 2020, What You Should Know About Comics, Graphic Novels, and Manga in Classrooms.

Abstract: A panel of educators and librarians—Karen Gavigan, Christina Taylor, Kat Kan, Esther Keller—discussed how the comics medium works and why it has become so popular, particularly amongst younger readers. They’ll answer the questions librarians and educators frequently have about comics, as well as those asked by parents who don’t believe comics count as “real” reading.

EHSAN MOHAMMADI

One of my 2018 journal article published in PLOS ONE has been ranked in the top 1% cited documents among all social science publications in Web of Science in 2020.

Citation: Mohammadi, E., Thelwall, M., Kwasny, M., & Holmes, K. L. (2018). Academic information on Twitter: A user survey. PloS one, 13(5), e0197265.

Link: https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0197265

Also, the following papers have been listed in the top 1% of cited documents among all social science publications in Web of Science in 2017, 2018, and 2019.

Citations: Mohammadi, E., & Thelwall, M. (2014). Mendeley readership altmetrics for the social sciences and humanities: Research evaluation and knowledge flows. Journal of the Association for Information Science and Technology, 65(8), 1627-1638.

Mohammadi, E., Thelwall, M., Haustein, S., & Larivière, V. (2015). Who reads research articles? An altmetrics analysis of Mendeley user categories. Journal of the Association for Information Science and Technology, 66(9), 1832-1846.

Mohammadi, E., Thelwall, M., & Kousha, K. (2016). Can M Mendeley bookmarks reflect readership? A survey of user motivations. Journal of the Association for Information Science and Technology, 67(5), 1198-1209.

Link to screenshots from WOS: https://www.dropbox.com/sh/9i0yzvsgc4fhlfg/AAAhY1kLAP3yzfdBng1V_6iSa?dl=0

 

CONFERENCE PAPERS

DARIN FREEBURG

Citation: Freeburg, D. (2020). Supporting refugees by facilitating the innovation of nonprofit resettlement agencies: A case study. Long paper presented at the 83rd Annual Meeting of the Association for Information Science and Technology, Virtual.

Abstract: This study tested the implementation of the Information for Innovation model (IIM). The IIM posits that to implement innovations and adapt to external change, nonprofits must increase both the inward and outward flow of information. This increased flow comes through experimentation, information-seeking, and self-expression. Over one year, the researcher implemented the model with a refugee resettlement nonprofit in the Southeastern U.S. A case study design was used, following the approach of Community-Based Participatory Research (CBPR). The implementation of the IIM followed the structure of Communities of Practice (COP), and participants held several face-to-face meetings and engaged in virtual information seeking. Results show that increases in information seeking improved the nonprofit’s confidence in its ability to manage change. Improvements in self expression enabled the nonprofit to benefit more fully from the diversity of existing staff. Yet, the IIM’s impact on implementation was limited by lack of resources. This study contributes to literature on the expansion of Library and Information Science (LIS) into communities by proposing an evidence-based approach to working with nonprofits. This study also contributes to literature on the role of LIS in refugee populations, suggesting that these institutions work more directly with the nonprofits whose expertise and funding most directly supports refugees.

DARIN FREEBURG

Citation: Freeburg, D. (2020). Helping LIS faculty know what it's like to work in a library. Proceedings of the Association for Library and Information Science Education Annual Conference: ALISE 2020, virtual.

Abstract: The current study is a follow-up to a 2019 study that found that practicing librarians viewed the MLIS as irrelevant and outdated. Focus group transcripts from that study were analyzed to uncover additional questions, potential solutions, and suggestions for further study. Participants were concerned that faculty were disconnected from the library as a workplace. The current study suggests the use of faculty development workshops, led by practicing librarians, to help keep faculty current on library practice. Link

AMIR KARAMI, VICTORIA MONEY (Sociology Ph.D. student), BRIE TURNER-MCGRIEVY (Arnold School of Public Health faculty)

Citation: Money, V., Karami, A., Turner‐McGrievy, B., & Kharrazi, H. (2020). Seasonal characterization of diet discussions on Reddit. Proceedings of the Association for Information Science and Technology, 57(1), e320.

Abstract: To monitor public opinions on diet, large survey data is commonly used, though costly and time consuming. Social media has become a mainstream channel of communication and has drastically grown in popularity, connecting users to a ready stream of health information. While the literature has provided valuable information on the use of social media for health, a broader perspective informed by different types of social media platforms would be highly beneficial. Diet has been extensively explored on a few mainstream platforms, further informing public health research. However, diet conversations on Reddit have only been studied within a narrow scope, looking at specific sub-communities. This study aims to characterize diet-related posts and their seasonal patterns using a mixed method approach. We collected more than 500,000 posts with subsequent comments from Reddit over the course of a year. Our findings show that Reddit users across all sub-communities primarily discussed health promotion, fitness plans, a healthy lifestyle, diet and fitness progress, food experiences, weight loss, as well as vegan and vegetarian diets. In addition, seasonal differences based on the weight of most topics, were found to be significant (p < 0.05). Link

AMIR KARAMI and FRANK WEBB (UofSC Honors College)

Citation: Karami, A., & Webb, F. (2020). Analyzing health tweets of LGB and transgender individuals. Proceedings of the Association for Information Science and Technology, 57(1), e264.

Abstract: There are millions of LGB and transgender individuals in the world. However, conducting LGBT health-related studies are labor-intensive and time-consuming because of the challenges inherent in studying these hidden populations. Social media sites like Twitter provide a platform for LGBT users to share their health concerns, giving researchers the opportunity to collect and analyze these social comments. This research used mixed methods to examine the linguistic and semantic characteristics of health-related tweets shared by self-identified LGBT individuals. Findings uncovered several health-related topics shared by LGBT users. Further, while LGB and transgender communities are within the LGBT umbrella, we found a significant linguistic difference between the tweets shared by LGB and transgender individuals. These findings show further disparities within an already marginalized group, indicating the need for customized healthcare to improve the health of all people. Our research approach can also inform studies in the areas of informatics, health, and medicine for analyzing the health concerns of not only sexual and gender minorities but also other hidden populations. Link

AMIR KARAMI, SUZANNE SWAN (Department of Psychology faculty) and MARCOS F. MORAES (Computer Science alumna)

Citation: Karami, A., Swan, S., & Moraes, M. F. (2020). Space identification of sexual harassment reports with text mining. Proceedings of the Association for Information Science and Technology, 57(1), e265.

Abstract: Sexual harassment is an invisible problem that has been difficult to combat because victims are often reluctant to report. However, within the past years, the sheer volume of women who have spoken up about sexual harassment has brought the issue to the forefront. This change has been largely driven, in part, by Internet and social media technologies. Given the large size of data posted on these online technologies, it is impossible to manually analyze and organize it; therefore, there is a need to utilize data and text mining methods. In order to help the fight against sexual harassment, this study proposes a predictive framework to collect more than 14,000 sexual harassment reports on the everyday sexism project (ESP) website and identify the space (location) in the reports. Our framework achieves a 85.33% accuracy for seven space classes including workplace, public space, home, public transport, school, university, and media. This paper also enriches experiments by merging similar classes (e.g., school and university) and applies a feature selection method to reduce the number of features for efficiency and effectiveness purposes. This enrichment process offers promising results for different sets of classes and features, ranging from 86% - 93% accuracy. Link

AMIR KARAMI and MACKENZIE ANDERSON (MLIS student)

Citation: Karami, A., & Anderson, M. (2020). Social media and COVID‐19: Characterizing anti‐quarantine comments on Twitter. Proceedings of the Association for Information Science and Technology, 57(1), e349.

Abstract: Social media has become a mainstream channel of communication during the COVID‐19 pandemic. While some studies have been developed on investigating public opinion on social media data regarding COVID‐19 pandemic, there is no study analyzing anti‐quarantine comments on social media. This study collected and analyzed near 80,000 tweets to understand anti‐quarantine social comments. Using text mining, we found 11 topics representing different issues such as comparing COVID‐19 and flu and health side effects of quarantine. We believe that this study shines a light on public opinion of people who are against quarantine. Link

AMIR KARAMI, MACKENZIE ANDERSON (MLIS student) and PARISA BOZORGI (Arnold School of Public Health Ph.D. student)

Citation: Anderson, M., Karami, A., & Bozorgi, P. (2020). Social Media and COVID-19: Can Social Distancing be Quantified without Measuring Human Movements? Proceedings of the Association for Information Science and Technology.

Abstract: The COVID‐19 outbreak has posed significant threats to international health and the economy. In the absence of treatment for this virus, public health officials asked the public to practice social distancing to reduce the number of physical contacts. However, quantifying social distancing is a challenging task and current methods are based on human movements. We propose a time and cost‐effective approach to measure how people practice social distancing. This study proposes a new method based on utilizing the frequency of hashtags supporting and encouraging social distancing for measuring social distancing. We have identified 18 related hashtags and tracked their trends between Jan and May 2020. Our evaluation results show that there is a strong correlation (p < .05) between our findings and the Google social distancing report. Link

VANESSA KITZIE

Citation: Barriage, S., Kitzie, V., Floegel, D., & Oltmann, S. (2020, October). “It’s hard to see how these would be harmful to kids:” Public library staff perceptions of child development and drag queen storytime. Paper presented at the Canadian Association of Information Science Conference.

Abstract: This paper reports preliminary results of a survey of 458 public library staff members regarding their perceptions of drag queen storytimes (DQS) and the ways in which these storytimes influence child development. The majority of respondents from libraries that have hosted at least one DQS agreed that DQS support healthy child development and positively influence children’s understanding of gender and/or sexuality, while respondents from libraries that have not hosted DQS were more likely to disagree or report being undecided. Specific ways in which respondents perceive DQS to influence child development are also analyzed.

VANESSA KITZIE, TRAVIS WAGNER, NICK VERA and JOCELYN PETTIGREW (MLIS alumna)

Citation: Kitzie, V., Wagner, T.L, Vera, A.N., & Pettigrew, J. (2020). Using the World Café methodology to support community-centric research and practice in Library and Information Science. Paper presented at the ALISE 2020 Annual Meeting (Conference held online due to COVID-19) [ALISE/ProQuest Methodology Paper Award Winner].

Abstract: The World Café (TWC) methodology facilitates community conversations that foster participant-led collective change. Its core principles align with the LIS field, which has become increasingly participatory and community-centric. The authors report on a case study applying TWC to a community forum between lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, intersex, and asexual (LGBTQIA+) community leaders, librarians, and paraprofessionals from [name removed for blind review]. The subject of the forum was how public libraries could assist local LGBTQ+ communities in addressing their health questions and concerns. Findings indicate that while TWC opened up new avenues and offered promising future directions for collaborations between LGBTQIA+ communities and public libraries, it also failed to consider structural inequalities and facilitate social change. Based on these weaknesses, the authors conclude with implications for revising the methodology to address these issues by adopting reflexive and intersectional methods. 

VANESSA KITZIE, TRAVIS WAGNER and NICK VERA

Citation: Kitzie, V., Wagner, T.L., & Vera, A.N. (2020). “When someone sees me, I am nothing of the norm:” Examining the discursive role power plays in shaping LGBTQ+ health information practices. Short paper to be presented at the 83rd Annual Proceedings of the American Society for Information Science and Technology.

Abstract: This paper examines how discursive power shapes LGBTQ+ individual and community health information practices. Informed by analysis of 10 information worlds maps drawn by SC LGBTQ+ community leaders, our findings indicate that while community can be a valuable construct to reject mainstream discourses of regulation and correction, it inevitably is fraught and not representative of all LGBTQ+ individuals. Findings can inform strategies for community leaders to facilitate more equitable information flow among members by identifying key structural elements impeding this flow at the community level.

VANESSA KITZIE

Citation: Floegel, D., Barriage, S., Kitzie, V., & Oltmann, S. (2020). Values, risks, and power influencing librarians’ decisions to host drag queen storytime. Short paper to be presented at the 83rd Annual Proceedings of the American Society for Information Science and Technology.

Abstract: This paper reports preliminary qualitative findings from a survey of public library staff who work at libraries that have and have not hosted drag queen storytimes (DQS), a popular but contested children’s program. Three constructs—values, risks, and power—are developed to describe how individual, library, and institutional forces combine to determine whether DQS occur. Findings contribute to limited scholarly work on DQS by including locations that have not hosted DQS and by engaging critically with how institutional forces shape library staffs’ decision-making around DQS. It is critical to understand factors contributing to this decision-making to inform contextually appropriate strategies for encouraging dialogue about DQS as well as LGBTQ+ visibility and justice in children’s programming. Moreover, DQS constitute a salient context through which to critically explore broader issues of power and inclusion in public libraries.

KIM THOMPSON

We presented on the Australia library science job ad data we collected in 2018 and 2019 and how disability is poorly represented there and led a roundtable discussion about how to improve awareness of inclusive workplaces starting with MLIS classroom topics.

Citation: Thompson, K. M., Muir, R., & Qayyum, A. (2020, October 20). Transforming LIS education through disability inclusion. Panel discussion at the meeting of the Association for Library and Information Science Education (ALISE) 2020, 14-22 October, virtual.

Abstract: The panel interrogated the notion of “academic integrity” based on the existing legal and higher education definitions and policies, showing its loose interpretation and misuse in the context of disability inclusion, and reminding us to critically question the integrity of the curriculum that was created exclusive. It will set the stage for other presentations and table activities included in the session.


JOURNAL ARTICLES

NICOLE COOKE

Citation: Cooke, Nicole A., Kellee E. Warren, Molly Brown, and Athena Jackson. “It Starts at Home: Infusing Radical Empathy into Graduate Education,” in “Radical Empathy in Archival Practice,” eds. Elvia Arroyo-Ramirez, Jasmine Jones, Shannon O’Neill, and Holly Smith. Special issue, Journal of Critical Library and Information Studies, 3.

Abstract: This interview features a conversation between a library and information science educator (Cooke) and three archival and special collections professionals with varying levels of experience in the field (Warren, Brown, and Jackson). Among the goals of this frank conversation is to highlight the lived experiences of practicing archivists and educators and discuss why it is becoming increasingly important to talk about empathy, diversity, equity, and inclusion in greater context. As part of that context, we must discuss the need to continuously infuse these values into graduate education, professional development, research, writing, and peer mentoring. Espousing and implementing an ethics of care is an ongoing and necessary process and commitment—to ourselves, to the information professions, and to our communities. Link 

DARIN FREEBURG

I developed an information-based model for organizational complexity and adaptation. Article published in the Journal of Information & Knowledge Management.

Citation: Freeburg, D. (2020). Complex systems and how complex non-profits can harness the flow of information. Journal of Information & Knowledge Management, 19(3), 1-15.

Abstract: Non-profits must continuously adapt themselves to changing circumstances, but they often lack the resources necessary to adapt successfully. This paper proposes a model to help non-profits overcome this challenge. It explains the role of information in the adaptation of complex systems and suggests a process that non-profits can follow to direct the flow of this information. The Information for Innovation Model (IIM) presented in the paper explains how the inflow and outflow of information influences a system's adaptation. A series of steps are then proposed for the design of Communities of Practice (CoP) that can help organisations implement the model. Librarians, trained in information-seeking and focused on increasing their reach beyond the library, can support a non-profit following these steps. This paper contributes to the literature on complexity science by articulating a process that organisations can follow to influence the inflow and outflow of information. This process highlights new roles for both CoPs and librarians within non-profits. This is important because non-profits often lack resources necessary for innovation, and librarians are looking for new ways to extend their reach. Link

 

JACOB LONG

We show that political satire programs, like The Daily Show with Trevor Noah and Saturday Night Live, help get their viewers more involved in politics. Our data suggest that this happens because those shows make their viewers feel more confident in their understanding of politics.

Citation: Long, J. A., Jeong, M. S., & Lavis, S. M. (2020). Political comedy as a gateway to news use, internal efficacy, and participation: A longitudinal mediation analysis. Human Communication Research. doi: 10.1093/hcr/hqaa011

Abstract: Despite a great deal of research, much about the effects of political comedy programming on its viewers remains uncertain. One promising line of work has focused on increased internal political efficacy—the sense that one is competent to engage with politics—as an outcome of exposure to political comedy programs. This may explain results showing that viewers are more likely to participate in politics. We extend this approach by considering the role of political comedy’s “gateway” effect in encouraging political media consumption, which can promote additional increases in efficacy and participation. This study provides a theoretical synthesis of prior research and a rigorous empirical test using a representative panel survey of adults in the United States, providing evidence of a relationship between political comedy and participation with both news use and internal efficacy serving as mediators. Furthermore, we find that only political satire, not late-night talk shows, appear to produce these effects. Link

HOLLY OVERTON, MINHEE CHOI (Ph.D. alumna), JANE WEATHERRED (Ph.D. alumna) and NANLAN ZHANG (Ph.D. student)

This study offers an example of a company that is widely viewed as a corporate social justice advocate that took a stand on an important social justice issue. It argues that companies need to have a strong, clearly communicated social purpose that fuels their existence, and employees need to be on the front line as ambassadors of social advocacy. This is a top SSCI journal loaded with practical implications.

Citation: Overton, H.K., Choi, M., Weatherred, J., & Zhang, N. (2020). Testing the viability of emotions and issue involvement as predictors of CSA response behaviors. Journal of Applied Communication Research. Advance online publication. doi:10.1080/00909882.2020.1824074

Abstract: Corporate social advocacy (CSA) has become more prominent as companies continue taking stands on politically charged social issues. This study examines emotions and issue involvement as antecedents of theory of planned behavior variables (attitudes, subjective norms, and perceived behavioral control) to predict CSA response behaviors. A survey (N=373) was conducted to examine the public’s response to a recent CSA example – Nike’s ad campaign featuring Colin Kaepernick. Implications for theory and practice are discussed. Link

HOLLY OVERTON and BROOKE MCKEEVER

Through a national sample survey of 1275 participants on the topic of social and political activism, this study explored how individuals’ anger and efficacy predicted their attitudes toward activism, communication behaviors, and financial support behaviors. Findings revealed efficacy as a greater predictor of action taking than anger in most conditions.

Citation: Austin, L., Overton, H.K., McKeever, B.W., & Bortree, D.S. (2020). Examining the rage donation trend: Applying the Anger Activism Model to explore communication and donation behaviors. Public Relations Review. Advance online publication

Abstract: A national survey (N = 1275) explored how individuals’ anger and efficacy predict attitudes toward political and social activism, related communication behaviors, and financial support behaviors. Findings revealed partial support for the Anger Activism Model, which was tested in this unique context. Efficacy emerged as a stronger predictor compared to anger, and path analysis suggests that while anger directly predicts attitudes and communication behaviors, it also partially predicts efficacy. Link

SUSAN RATHBUN-GRUBB

Citation: Rathbun-Grubb, S. (2021). Voices of Strength: A Survey of Librarians Working with Chronic Illnesses or Conditions. Journal of Library Administration, volume 61, number 1.

Abstract: This research attempts to understand the ways that librarians overcome the challenges associated with a chronic condition in the workplace. 616 respondents completed a survey about type of workplace, type of chronic condition, longevity of the condition, disclosure, accommodations, level of support, career mobility and advancement, work challenges, coping strategies, and perceptions on disability. Respondents report chronic illness and conditions of all sorts, both visible and invisible, with 46% having more than one type of illness. They cope by using creative strategies to supplement or replace formal accommodations, however 39% believe that their condition has negatively impacted their career advancement.

ERIC ROBINSON and MORGAN B. HILL (B.A. alumna, J.D. student)

Eric P. Robinson and Morgan B. Hill have published The Trouble with "True Threats," in the University of Baltimore UB Journal of Media Law & Ethics. Our journal article explores what criteria courts have used to determine whether a statement is a “true threat” under federal law, after the U.S. Supreme Court's failure to clarify the issue.

Citation: Robinson, E. and Hill, M. (2020), The Trouble with True Threats, University of Baltimore Journal of Media Law & Ethics 8:2, 37-67.

Abstract: In the midst of prevalent abusive language online, the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision in Elonis v. United States did not resolve many issues in how to determine whether a statement is a “true threat” under federal law, and the court denied certiorari in three subsequent cases that presented the opportunity to clarify the law on this point. In the absence of such guidance, federal courts have applied various factors to rule in these cases. This paper quantifies and analyzes how these courts have applied various factors, showing the need for clear standards for what communication can be considered “true threats.” Link

KIM THOMPSON

The way we craft job ads has a direct affect on how diverse our workplaces can become. This study examines job ads in the library and information science sector for wording that might invite or dissuade diverse populations from applying. International collaboration with two colleagues in Australia--one of whom is a doctoral student (Muir).

Citation: Muir, R., Thompson, K. M., & Qayyum, A. (2020). The diversity we seek: A document analysis of diversity and inclusion in the Australian library and information sector job advertisements. Journal of the Australian Library and Information Association. DOI: 10.1080/24750158.2020.1812023

Abstract: A finding of the 2019 Australian Library and Information Association’s Workforce Diversity Trend Report was that the diversity of Australian communities has not translated to diversity in the library and information science professions. In the wake of this report, we reviewed how Australian library and information science job advertisements discuss and recruit for diversity in their organisations. Drawing from a sample of 208 job advertisements collected from 22 January to 22 February 2019 and 86 job advertisements collected during 22 January to 3 February 2018, and using qualitative and quantitative document analysis, we provide an analysis of how the wording in library and information science job advertisements can specifically invite application from diversity groups including people with a disability, LGBTIQA+, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders, culturally and linguistically diverse groups, age, and by gender. Link

TAYLOR WEN and JACKSON CARTER (Ph.D. student)

Our paper titled, "Ads for Forever Families: How Public Service Advertising Portrays Adoptive Children and Teenagers," was accepted for publication in Advertising & Society Quarterly in the January issue of 2021. This research informs social work professionals and advertising practitioners about how media portray family adoption and is aimed at helping them to strategize and then shape future campaigns that encourage system support.

Citation: Carter, J. & Wen, T. J. (2021) Ads for Forever Families: How Public Service Advertising Portrays Adoptive Children and Teenagers. Advertising & Society Quarterly.

Abstract: There is a dearth of research regarding family adoption in the advertising field, which hinders meaningful progress in helping policymakers, academics, and content creators, that support adoptive families and children in need of adoption. This study uses a qualitative approach to identify the persuasive appeals, dominant frames and media representation of adoptive parents and children in public service advertisements that promote adoption. This research informs social work professionals and advertising practitioners about how media portray family adoption and is aimed at helping them to strategize and then shape future campaigns that encourage system support.

LINWAN WU and ANAN WAN (Ph.D alumna)

Citation: Wan, A., & Wu, L. (2020). Understanding the negative consequences of watching social live streaming among Chinese viewers. International Journal of Communication, 14, 5311-5330.

Abstract: As an emerging media technology, social live streaming has been gaining prevalence worldwide, especially in some East Asian countries such as China. Meanwhile, this media format has received increasing criticism for its negative impact on individual viewers. The present study conducted an online survey among current viewers of social live streaming (N = 244) in China to test a conceptual model that explains how watching live streams leads to undesirable consequences. The findings indicate that viewers’ enjoyment with broadcasters was positively associated with their parasocial relationship with the broadcasters, which in turn led to increased loneliness and addiction among the viewers. Viewers’ perceptions of loneliness were also a direct factor that influenced their addictive media usage. In addition, viewers’ entertainment-seeking motive and social interaction motive were identified as the antecedents to their enjoyment with broadcasters. These findings are believed to provide both theoretical and practical implications for the field of emerging digital media. Link


PANELS AND PRESENTATIONS

CAROLYN CLICK and ALLISON ASKINS (SJMC adjunct)

At an Oct. 6 webinar at the Center for Teaching Excellence, we talked about the role of journalists and journalism in the wake of the killing of George Floyd and the Black Lives Matter protests that erupted in the United States and around the world. As part of this discussion, we looked back to the 1990s and 2000s and our years covering religion and civil rights in South Carolina to consider what we got right and what we may have missed in writing daily news stories. We worked together as journalists in the late 1990s and 2000s. In the wake of the Black Lives Matter protests and debates in today's newsrooms, we looked back at our work in religion and civil rights to examine what we got right and what we may have missed. Link

VALERIE BYRD FORT, DODIE LIMBERG (Department of Educational Studies) and SHELBY GONZALES (Counselor Education and Supervision Ph.D. candidate)

Presentation about Social Media and its effects on children and young adults for the South Carolina Department of Mental Health.

DARIN FREEBURG

Citation: Agarwal, N.K., Oh, K., Williams, R., Freeburg D., Rosenbaum, H., Kwasnik, B. (2020). Standing out in the academic LIS job market: An interactive panel for doctoral students. Panel. 83rd Annual Meeting of the Association for Information Science and Technology, Virtual.

Abstract: This proposal builds on the previous successes of the interactive panels sponsored by the ASIS&T Special Interest Group on Education (SIG ED) at the 2017, 2015, 2013, 2012, and 2011 annual meetings. The all-new 2020 panel features faculty in various stages of their academic careers, including a relatively new assistant professor, one who has just completed the tenure process, two associate professors, a full professor, and a professor emerita. The panelists are prepared to address audience questions on topics such as the traditional academic job market, alternative career paths including post-doctoral opportunities, development of personal research agendas, challenges of online instruction (Sithole et al., 2019), as well as the challenges and disruption caused in higher education due to the COVID-19 situation (Amour, 2020). The panel discussion will focus around the academic job market and how applicants can present themselves in the best light depending upon the type of position sought. Doctoral students will gain valuable insights on finishing their dissertation, weighing postdoctoral opportunities, and preparing for their first academic position. The panel will be useful not only to doctoral students but also to postdocs, adjuncts, and assistant-to-associate-to-full professors, as the panelists share their insights and experience through various career stages.

KAREN GAVIGAN

Virtual Presentation at the SC Library Association Conference (SCLA). Teaching the Civil Rights Movement through Library of Congress Primary Sources and Graphic Novels.

Citation: Gavigan, K. (2020, October 13). Teaching the Civil Rights Movement through Library of Congress Primary Sources and Graphic Novels. South Carolina Library Association Conference.

KAREN GAVIGAN

Virtual presentation at the New Mexico Library Association Conference. Teaching the Civil Rights Movement through Library of Congress Primary Sources and Graphic Novels.

Citation: Gavigan, K. (2020, October 22). Teaching the Civil Rights Movement through Library of Congress Primary Sources and Graphic Novels. New Mexico Library Association Conference.

KAREN GAVIGAN

Virtual presentation at the New Mexico Library Association Conference. Teaching Social Justice to Students through Graphic Novels.

Citation: Garrison, K. (2020, October 23). Teaching Social Justice to Students through Graphic Novels. New Mexico Library Association Conference.

VANESSA KITZIE and TRAVIS WAGNER

Citation: Wagner, T., Kitzie, V., & Floegel, D. (2020). Seeking information between and beyond binaries: Exploring how queer theory can inform LIS theories. Panel to be presented during the SIG Gender Meeting at the 2020 ALISE Conference.

Abstract: Queer theory offers a rich set of ideas, epistemologies, and methodological interventions whose incorporation into theories of information allows for growth, expansion, and potential alteration of library and information science scholarship, pedagogy, and research praxis. This presentation provides a primer for queer theory and applies tenets from its vast canon of thought to three ongoing LIS-based research projects. Each project and application engages with existing information science theories and illuminates how queer theory challenges, unsettles, and even reconstitutes the epistemological assumptions latent within them. The first project deploys queer phenomenology to understand how one’s embodied queerness, or lack thereof, informs their perception of difference and identity within information seeking and creation. The second project examines how authenticity shapes insider/outsider dynamics within queer communities as it relates to information flow. This work presents realness, as developed by queer and trans people of color, as an alternative approach to envisioning these dynamics that leaves space to privilege individual subjectivities regarding information interactions. The third project uses notions of queer imaginaries and futurities to critique utoptic conceptions of information systems in sociotechnical work. The presentation culminates in a discussion of what queering information science could and should do, and suggests ways in which queer theoretical perspectives may be applied to the field of library and information science more broadly. 

VANESSA KITZIE

During the panel below, I will give a brief, invited presentation titled, “Examining the health information practices of LGBTQIA+ communities.” This presentation connects findings examining the health information practices of queer and trans communities in South Carolina with information behavior and practices theory. Two theoretical implications from these findings are: 1) centering community as the unit of analysis, and 2) locating failure and resistance within information practices. These implications can lead to theory that rejects deficit models/framing and recognizes community agency, rather than only the ways in which people are constrained by social and structural factors.

Citation: Hansen, P., Hartel, J., Kitzie, V., Koh, K., & Zhang, P. (2020). Grand theories in information behavior research. Panel to be presented during the SIG USE Symposium at the 83rd Annual ASIS&T Meeting, October 23-28, 2020.

VANESSA KITZIE

Citation: Kitzie, V., Gibson, A., Phillips, A., & Matos, A. (2020). Prioritizing marginalized populations in information science. Panel to be presented during the Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion Accelerator Series at the 83rd Annual ASIS&T Meeting, October 23-28, 2020.

Abstract: Our communities and society are increasingly diverse and should be adequately represented in library and information science (LIS) classrooms and literature (Cooke, 2016). In the past few years, the literature has increased, but LIS still has work to do in regard to amplifying marginalized voices (Gibson & Hughes-Hassell, 2017). This panel features researchers and LIS educators who advocate for, teach, and conduct research with marginalized populations in order to amplify and normalize the voices and experiences of those often thought of as “others”. 

SUSAN RATHBUN-GRUBB

Susan presented "The Importance of Librarianship to iSchool Curricula: Student Expectations" on a panel at the 2020 virtual Association for Library and Information Science Education annual conference.

ERIC ROBINSON

Panelist on use of legal theory in studying historical media law events and cases. I discussed the application and use of legal theory in the research and writing of my book, Robinson, E. (2018). Reckless Disregard: St. Amant v. Thompson and the Transformation of Libel Law. Baton Rouge, La.: LSU Press.

Citation: Robinson, E. (panelist) (2020, Oct. 3). Alexander Meiklejohn’s “Democratic Self-Governance” and Libel in Politics. In Patrick File (Moderator), Talking Theory: New Scholarship in Journalism’s Legal History. Panel presented at 39th Annual AJHA [American Journalism Historians Association] Convention.

Abstract: Scholars have recently produced exciting studies on a range of legal issues that faced the press in the 19th and 20th centuries: from libel to hot news, privilege to access. That means now is a good moment to reflect on the variety of theoretical approaches used to illuminate and understand the role the law has played in the historical development of journalism. This panel will bring together authors of work on the legal history of the press to discuss the development of these studies, their theoretical perspectives, and how they can help us think about the connections between the law and history of the press. 

KIM THOMPSON

Plenary address for the 15th annual Honduras Library Association (ABIDH) conference. Since it was online, participants from throughout Central America (Honduras, El Salvador, Costa Rica, etc.) also attended.

Citation: Thompson, K. M. (2020, October 21). Las bibliotecas y los Objetivos de Desarrollo Sostenible 2030 del ONU: Un viaje global/Libraries and the UN 2030 Sustainable Development Goals: A global voyage. Virtual plenary address, Asociación de Bibliotecarios y Documentalistas de Honduras Jornadas 2020/15th Annual ABIDH Conference.

Description: The presentation provided examples of libraries around the world that are advancing and participating in accomplishing the United Nations 2030 Sustainable Development Goals. It was a wonderful conference, but so difficult--as most of the attendees are under strict lockdown in their countries and have been since March, so are struggling to find ways to be innovative with the library services they can currently offer. 

KIM THOMPSON and CLAYTON COPELAND

Dr. Copeland and Dr. Thompson co-led a cluster session discussion with colleagues Dr. Briony Birdi and Dr. Rhonda McEwen (focusing on Dr Nicole Cooke's recent Publisher's Weekly article about "standing in the gap") about ways to support colleagues in the workplace in terms of social justice, diversity, equity, and inclusion.

Citation: 2020, October 23, ALISE Academy -- The diversity mindset: A guiding principle for leadership in the information fields. Expert panel discussion hosted by Nadia Caidi and Keren Dali, featuring panelists Shimelis Assefa, Karen Fisher, Spencer Lilley, Briony Birdi, Clayton A. Copeland, Rhonda McEwen, Kim M. Thompson, Brady Lund, and Javed Mostafa.

Abstract: Diversity, equity, and inclusion are an inseparable part of scholarship, professional practice, and education of information professionals. Cultivating a diversity mindset is therefore essential. We bring together scholars and practitioners to address how a diversity mindset can foster sustainable change and effective leadership in the areas of scholarly communication; teaching and pedagogy; and equitable workplaces. Link - Article


OTHER ACTIVITIES

AMIR KARAMI

Dr. Karami organized a workshop at the ASIST 2020 on grant proposal development and invited researchers awarded grants from the NSF, NIH, IMLS, Amazon, Google, etc.. to share their best practices.

Abstract: Proposal development is an essential skill for academics of all ranks. During proposal development, researchers can better organize their thoughts for what they want to plan and achieve in a research project. Even if a research proposal is not awarded, the exercise of proposal writing is often beneficial to the research process. Today, one’s ability to seek and receive funding from grant agencies is often used as a yardstick for important personnel decisions by academic institutions. However, researchers, especially junior faculty members, who are just starting their careers often have limited experience with the grant development process. The goal of this half-day workshop is to provide practical guides to investigators, enhancing their understanding of the process and their abilities to write a successful external grant proposal. Participants will have the opportunity to learn best practices from senior scholars who have been awarded several external grants from multiple agencies and agreed to present in this workshop.

VANESSA KITZIE

Vanessa Kitzie will be participating in an invited webinar this month.

Citation: Keith, K. & Kitzie, V. (2020). The ACA and advancing LGBTQ health. Public Library Association webinar. 

Abstract: The COVID-19 pandemic has made it critical for health information providers across the country to stay informed about the special protections and benefits health insurance coverage offers to the safety of LGBTQ community members. This free webinar will help educate public library practitioners about available health insurance coverage options, benefits, and special federal protections exclusively for LGBTQ communities during the Open Enrollment period of the Affordable Care Act (Nov. 1–Dec. 15, 2020 for plans that start Jan. 1. 2021). It will also cover Special Enrollment Period eligibility for people who have experienced lifetime events, such as losing a job or having a baby. At the conclusion of this webinar, participants will be able to: Describe the major health and healthcare access disparities affecting the LGBTQ population, including specific subpopulations such as transgender people; Describe the provisions of the Affordable Care Act that have relevance for addressing these disparities; Explain specific strategies that library workers, consumer assistance personnel, and other health information providers can use to effectively connect with LGBTQ community members; Identify the role of Enrollment Assistors and Navigators in their communities who can help LGBTQ people enroll in available insurance; and Outline successful strategies for library outreach, engagement, and enrollment at the local level.

AWARDS AND GRANTS 

VANESSA KITZIE, TRAVIS WAGNER (iSchool Ph.D. candidate) and NICK VERA (iSchool Ph.D. student)

A paper that was virtually presented by Nick Vera at the Medical Librarian Association conference was awarded 3rd place by the research awards judging team.

Citation: Kitzie, V., Wagner, T.L., & Vera, A.N. (to be presented virtually). Understanding the health information practices of LGBTQ+ communities to improve medical librarian services. Paper accepted for presentation at the Medical Library Association Annual Meeting, Portland, OR, May 15-19. [3rd place Research Paper Award].

HOLLY OVERTON

Holly Overton was named Senior Research Fellow with the Arthur W. Page Center for Integrity in Public Communication. She will lead a call for research proposals on Corporate Social Advocacy for the Page/Johnson Scholar grant program. Overton has been a Center scholar since 2014. She will also conduct her own grant-funded research through her appointment as Senior Research Fellow. 


JOURNAL ARTICLES

VANESSA KITZIE, JOCELYN PETTIGREW (MLIS alumna), TRAVIS WAGNER (iSchool Ph.D. candidate) and NICK VERA (iSchool Ph.D. student)

Citation: Kitzie, V., Pettigrew, J., Wagner, T.L., & Vera, A.N. (in press). Using the World Café methodology to support community-centric research and practice in Library and Information Science. Library and Information Science Research 42(4).

Abstract: The World Café (TWC) methodology is a form of action research that develops collective knowledge among individuals and communities to address shared problems. TWC can complement LIS research and practice that is increasingly participatory and community centric. The potentials and pitfalls for TWC are illustrated by ongoing research examining public library service to LGBTQIA+ communities for health information. The authors used TWC in a community forum between LGBTQIA+ community leaders and librarians/paraprofessionals in South Carolina. Per TWC conventions, participants engaged in day-long rotating café-style table conversations that encouraged new ideas and collective dialogue. Discussion centered on two themes: barriers to health information faced by LGBTQIA+ communities and collective strategies for leaders and librarians and paraprofessionals to address them. Findings indicate that TWC can advance LIS research and practice in the following ways: refuting deficit frameworks, fostering information communities, and supporting social-justice-oriented praxis. Methodological shortcomings relate to the blind spots TWC affords to social inequality and power. The authors recommend that researchers and practitioners should incorporate intersectional and reflexive methods into TWC to address these shortcomings.

ROBERT MCKEEVER, S. MO JONES-JANG (former SJMC faculty), YU-JIN HEO (SJMC Ph.D. student), LEIGH MOSCOWITZ and DAVID MOSCOWITZ

Citation: Jones-Jang, S. M., Heo, Y.-J., McKeever, R., Kim, J.-H., Moscowitz, L., & Moscowitz, D. (2020). Good news! Communication findings may be underestimated: Comparing effect sizes with self-reported and logged smartphone use data. Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication, 1–18. 

Abstract: Despite long-standing concerns over self-reported measures of media use, media research has relied heavily on self-reported data. This study not only examined discrepancies between survey and logged smartphone data but assessed whether correlational outcomes using self-reported measures produce greater or smaller effect sizes compared to outcomes using logged measures.College students (n=294) and MTurk workers (n=291) provided self-reported and logged data of smartphone use over seven days. The correlations we examined involved four psychosocial contexts, including bridging, bonding, well-being, and problematic use of smartphones. The results showed that the effect sizes of correlations using self-reported data tend to be smaller compared to those using logged data. We believe that this is a hopeful message to the field. This could mean that extant survey results have not erroneously inflated communication findings and that communication researchers still have a lot to reveal with further refined measures.

KAREN MALLIA and ROSE NEEDLE (SCHC alumna)

The impact of environment on creativity is powerful and well-recognized. But few recognize how the typical creative office environment can negatively impact - and potentially undermine - the careers of those with an introverted personality. It is highly unusual for an undergraduate student to 1) have her research presented at American Academy of Advertising Conference which an earlier version of this was and 2) to get published in a top-tier journal. Rose went on to earn a Master of Marketing Research from UGA.

Citation: Needle, Rose R. and Karen L. Mallia (2020). Creatives in the office: Personality and the environmental aspects of work space. Journal of Current Issues & Research in Advertising.

Abstract: Open office plans have become the dominant mode for creative workplaces, designed to encourage collaboration. Little scholarly research assesses the validity of that trend, the conventional wisdom behind it, or the impact of open environments on creativity, employee productivity, satisfaction or success. This exploratory study surveys 143 people working in advertising and the creative industries, assessing perceptions of productivity and satisfaction with work environment along with personality type. A majority of respondents yearned for solitude to complete certain tasks. Findings suggest that open office environments may indeed undermine creative productivity, not just among introverts, but others as well. 

BROOKE MCKEEVER, JOHN A. BERNHART, SARA WILCOX, LINDSAY DECKER, DIANE K. EHLERS and JENNIFER R. O’NEILL (Arnold School of Public Health)

Citation: Bernhart, J.A., Wilcox, S., Decker, L., Ehlers, D.E., McKeever, B.W., O’Neill, J.R. (2020) “It’s having something that you’ve done it for:” Applying self-determination theory to participants’ experiences in a for-cause physical activity event. Journal of Health Psychology.

Abstract: For-cause physical activity events reach many people. Little research has applied self-determination theory to participants’ experiences in for-cause physical activity events. This qualitative study explored participants’ experiences in 5K for-cause physical activity events and intention to complete future events. Interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim. Emergent coding assessed responses for themes. Constructs of competence and relatedness were most prevalent and an altruistic desire to support the cause. Participants highlighted feelings of community supporting their intention to complete future events. Overall, experiences aligned with self-determination theory. Future studies may include altruism to understand leveraging opportunities for promoting physical activity.


PANELS AND PRESENTATIONS

CLAYTON COPELAND, CAROLINE SMITH and PENNY ESTERLEY (iSchool alumni)

Citation: Copeland, C.A., Smith, C., Esterley, P., Gignac, S., Taggart, J., White, K. (2020, August 4). Accessible virtual programming as the only programming (Plenary Panel). ASCIT’s 2020 Digital Accessibility Conference.

CLAYTON COPELAND and KIM THOMPSON

Conference information: 900 registrants with 500 synchronous and 400 asynchronous. Registrants were from at least four continents.

Citation: Copeland, C. A., & Thompson, K. M. (2020, September 23). Webinar on using Universal Design for Learning to enhance information literacy programs: Online and in the library. International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions (IFLA) Information Literacy Section and Library Services to People with Special Needs Section.

BROOKE MCKEEVER, ROBERT MCKEEVER and MINHEE CHOI (SJMC Ph.D. alumna)

We are presenting results from research funded by the Page Center for Integrity in Public Communication at the PRSA International Conference (now virtual) on October 26, 2020.

Citation: McKeever, B.W., Mckeever, R., Choi, M. (2020, October). Exploring advocacy, activism and related trends (and what they might mean for your organization). Presentation at the Public Relations Society of America (PRSA) International Conference (virtual).

Abstract: As multiple generations have become more engaged in advocacy and activism worldwide, it is important for us to understand these behaviors and the social science that helps explain them. Drawing on their professional experience in nonprofit and other industries, and using survey data collected in 2020, the panelists will explain the steps in a new scale they developed related to advocacy and activism and what it all means for communication practitioners.

JOURNAL ARTICLES

LINWAN WU and ZONGCHAO LI (former SJMC faculty)

Citation: Li, Z., Tao, W., & Wu, L. (2020). Examining the joint impact of relationship norms and service failure severity on consumer responses. Journal of Public Relations Research. DOI: 10.1080/1062726X.2020.1795867

Abstract: This study investigates consumers’ attitudinal and behavioral outcomes after service failure encounters with companies with which they have previously established good relationships. It indicates that conformity with or violation of relationship norms guides consumers’ decision making, and that their subsequent attitudinal and behavioral outcomes further depend on the severity of the service failure. Through a 2 (relationship norm types: exchange vs. communal) × 2 (service failure severity: minor vs. major) between-subjects experiment, the study shows that when the prior relationship norms are exchange-based, consumers demonstrate similar attitudes toward the minor and major failures. However, when these relationship norms are communally-based, consumers respond relatively positively in the minor failure situation, but they display more negative attitudes in the major failure situation. This study contributes to public relations literature regarding the role of company-consumer relationships in service failure situations. 

LINWAN WU and TAYLOR WEN

Citation: Jang, W., Wu, L., & Wen, J. (2020). Understanding the effects of different types of meaningful sports consumption on sports consumers’ emotions, motivations, and behavioral intentions. Sport Management Review. DOI:10.1016/j.smr.2020.07.002

Abstract: This study extends the existing sport management literature by examining how meaningful sports consumption could be conceptualized differently based on self-construal. In particular, we demonstrate that from a self-oriented perspective, highlighting the extraordinary skills of athletes makes sports consumption meaningful, whereas from an other-oriented perspective, highlighting the moral-excellence of athletes makes sports consumption meaningful. The results of two experiments indicated that sports consumers experienced different types of affective responses, self-transcendent emotions (admiration vs. elevation), motivations (self-improvement vs. compassionate love), and behavioral consequences (improving professional skills vs. helping others), depending on the type of sports consumption (skill-based meaningful vs. moral-based meaningful vs. hedonic), and the self-construal mindset (independent vs. interdependent).

KEVIN HULL and MILES ROMNEY (former SJMC faculty)

Article in the International Journal of Sport Communication about how local sports broadcasters adapted to not having sports to report on during the early days of COVID-19. Local sports broadcasters rely on live sports to fill their shows. When COVID-19 shut everything down, job duties and content changed dramatically, and some worried about the future of the profession.

Citation: Hull, K., & Romney, M., (2020). “It has changed completely”: How local sports broadcasters adapted to no sports. International Journal of Sport Communication. Advance online publication. 10.1123/ijsc.2020-0235.

Abstract: When COVID-19 shut down the sports world, local sports broadcasters were without the games and events that traditionally fill the content of their shows. While national media outlets could dive deep into the archives to play old games and classic content, local sports broadcasters traditionally do not have that option. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine how the jobs and daily routines of local sports broadcasters changed in the immediate aftermath of the COVID-19 outbreak. A cross-section of local sports broadcasters from a variety of markets was surveyed, and, based on the responses, several themes emerged: (a) an emphasis on creativity, (b) a shift in daily responsibility, (c) and an uncertain future. 

TAYLOR WEN, QUEENIE JO-YUN (Ph.D. alumna), ROBERT MCKEEVER, and JOON KYOUNG KIM (Ph.D. Alumnus)

Our collaborative paper, titled "Applying the theory of motivated information management to the context of conflicting online health information: Implications for childhood vaccination communication with parents" was accepted for publication in the International Journal of Strategic Communication.

Citation: Li, J., Wen, T. J., McKeever, R., & Kim, J. (2020) Applying the theory of motivated information management to the context of conflicting online health information: Implications for childhood vaccination communication with parents. International Journal of Strategic Communication.

Abstract: This study investigates how parents manage conflicting online information, which may affect their information-seeking behavior and decision-making about childhood vaccination, by applying the Theory of Motivated Information Management in online communication contexts. Although an extensive body of literature has demonstrated the effectiveness of TMIM in predicting how individuals manage health uncertainty and information in the interpersonal communication contexts, the present study goes beyond and applies the theoretical framework in online communication contexts. Our findings of a survey with 439 parents in the United States are in conjunction with previous applications of TMIM, which show that individuals adopt a similar process to deal with uncertainty resulting from conflicting information in the online environment. Although further research must be conducted to change perceptions, attitudes, and vaccine-related behaviors, this study may help communication practitioners, vaccination advocates, and related nonprofit organizations to eliminate misconceptions about immunization among parents. 

LINWAN WU and HOLLY OVERTON

Citation: Wu, L., & Overton, H. (2020). Is native advertising effective for corporate social responsibility messaging? How advertising recognition affects consumer responses to proactive versus reactive CSR. Journal of Advertising Research. DOI: 10.2501/JAR-2020-019

Abstract: This study investigates how advertising recognition influences consumer responses to a native advertisement about proactive or reactive corporate social responsibility (CSR). The results indicate that participants expressed more favorable attitudes and greater word-of-mouth intention toward a native advertisement of proactive CSR than one of reactive CSR only when they did not recognize the persuasion purpose of the native advertisement. This study also confirms perceived manipulativeness as the underlying mechanism of advertising recognition, and values-driven motivation as the underlying mechanism of CSR type in the context of native advertising. 

FEILI TU-KEEFNER

In 2017, a survey study examined how community members had accessed information during the 2015 flooding and during Hurricane Matthew in October 2016. We reported some research findings in this article. This article is published in Journal of Consumer Health on the Internet.

Citation: Tu-Keefner, F., Liu, J., Lyons, D., Hobbs, A., Smith, J. C., & Corbo, M. (2020) Disaster health information access and public libraries’ situation-specific information: What public librarians and library users said. Journal of Consumer Health on the Internet, 24(3), 201-227. 

Abstract: A 2017 situation-specific case study surveyed community members following the flooding in 2015 and Hurricane Matthew in 2016 in South Carolina. The study examined how community members used libraries’ critical disaster information services, focusing also on how the participants used disaster information sources and evaluated their credibility. The findings show that the community members surveyed valued highly the critical information services provided by public libraries and librarians. Even though most of the community members indicated that it was easy or very easy to find information, some of them did not use credible information resources either during or after the disaster.


OTHER ACTIVITIES AND HONORS

NICOLE COOKE

Nicole A. Cooke interviewed Dr. Ibram X. Kendi, author of “How to be Anti-Racist,” as part of Richland Library’s Let’s Talk Race programming.

KELLY DAVIS

Kelly Davis, APR, Fellow PRSA was selected for induction into the Public Relations Society of America's College of Fellows. The College of Fellows is an honorary organization within PRSA comprised of more than 350 practitioners and educators, each of whom has left a significant footprint on the public relations profession. Press release

PANELS AND PRESENTATIONS

CLAYTON COPELAND

Citation: Copeland, C.A. (2020, August 4). Universal design for learning [Virtual conference presentation]. Access South Carolina's Information Technology [ASCIT] 2020 Digital Accessibility Conference.

CLAYTON COPELAND and KIM THOMPSON (served as the moderator)

Citation: Copeland, C.A, & Mallary, K. J. (2020, August 24). Universal design and universal design for learning: Tools in equity of access [Webinar]. ALISE.

Abstract: Looking beyond her introduction to UDL presented to ALISE in 2019, Dr. Copeland has partnered with Kevin J. Mallary, a Ph.D. student in the iSchool at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, to advance the UDL conversation by posing the questions: How can LIS educators collaborate with their peers to implement the framework in their programs, and ultimately, their institutions? In these unprecedented times, what are some concrete strategies for implementing UDL across courses? How can UDL benefit disabled learners, and more broadly, all learners and instructors? How can the principles of UDL be adopted to create accessible online learning environments, as well as library and cultural heritage programming? During this webinar, which is sponsored by the newly established Disability in LIS SIG, Copeland and Mallary aim to discuss their questions with attendees and facilitate the rich exchange of ideas and resources for benefitting all learners. 

FEILI TU-KEEFNER

Citation: Tu-Keefner, F., Lyons, D. R., Hobbs, A., & Smith, J. C. (2020). Supporting staff in emergencies and natural disasters. Paper to be presented at Computers in Libraries & Internet Connect virtual event, September 21 – 25.

Abstract: Libraries’ information and community services take on heightened importance during emergencies and natural disasters. Following devastating flooding and hurricanes in South Carolina and Texas, a team from University of South Carolina’s School of Library and Information Science and the South Carolina State Library has taken a more concentrated interest in providing emergency preparedness, communication (including crisis communication and social media), and health resources to help libraries and partner agencies better plan for various disasters. Hear how LIS programs and cooperative organizations and agencies can strengthen librarians’ abilities to respond in times of crisis. Get the project team’s findings and resources to help your community become better prepared for future emergency and weather events.

AWARDS & GRANTS

VANESSA KITZIE, TRAVIS WAGNER, NICK VERA, DOM FRANCIS (Arnold School of Public Health) and JULIE SMITHWICK (Arnold School of Public Health)

Recipient of an Institute for Museum and Library Services (IMLS) National Leadership grant for $357,367 to understand and facilitate the health information practices of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, intersex, and asexual (LGBTQIA+) community health workers (CHWs). Based on this understanding, the project will develop a toolkit for medical librarians with strategies for partnering with CHWs in their local communities; a specialized LGBTQIA+ training curriculum for CHWs; and cultural and community competency training for medical librarians working with LGBTQIA+ CHWs. The CHW Institute at the Arnold School of Public Health’s Center for Community Health Alignment at the University of SC serves as a project partner. Understanding how LGBTQIA+ CHWs can engage in practices like finding, accessing, understanding, assessing, and disseminating health information is vital to informing how stakeholders like CHWs and medical librarians can promote community health and aligns with the call for evidence-based interventions within these fields. 

BOOK CHAPTERS

SHANNON BOWEN

Citation: Bowen, S. A., & Lovari, A. (2020). Crisis Management. In P. Harris, A. Bitonti, C. Fleisher, A. Skorkjær Binderkrantz (eds). The Palgrave Encyclopedia of Interest Groups, Lobbying and Public Affairs (pp. 1-10). Cham: Springer International Publishing. DOI:10.1007/978-3-030-13895-0

JOURNAL ARTICLES

SHANNON BOWEN

Citation: Bowen, S. A., & Heath, R. L. (2020). Intelligences in strategic issues management: Challenging the mutually beneficial relationship paradigm. Partecipazione e Conflitto: The Open Journal of Sociopolitical Studies, 13(2), pp. 1-20. https://DOI:10.1285/i20356609v13i2p1002

SHANNON BOWEN

Citation: Lovari A., D’Ambrosi, L. & Bowen, S. A., (2020). Re-connecting voices: The (new) strategic role of public sector communication after the Covid-19 crisis. Partecipazione e Conflitto: The Open Journal of Sociopolitical Studies, 13(2), pp. 1-20. https://DOI:10.1285/i20356609v13i2p970

KEVIN HULL and MILES ROMNEY (former SJMC faculty)

Citation: Hull, K., & Romney, M. (2020). Welcome to the Big Leagues: Exploring Rookie Sports Broadcasters’ Adjustment to New Careers. Journalism & Mass Communication Educator.

Abstract: The purpose of this study is to understand how effectively sports journalism programs and internship experiences are preparing graduates for careers in local TV sportscasting. This study also examines how local sports broadcasters are adjusting to the profession. Results demonstrate the value of a sports journalism education and sports media internship when graduates are attempting to land their first jobs in a local television sports department. However, despite the value shown, many local sports broadcasters, while enjoying it, are still having a difficult time in their first few years on the job.

Link: https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/1077695820933888

MINHEE CHOI (SJMC Doctoral graduate) and BROOKE MCKEEVER

Citation: Choi, M., & McKeever, B. W. (2020). Culture and Health Communication: A Comparative Content Analysis of Tweets from the United States and Korea. International Journal of Communication, 14.

Abstract: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) are central channels for the delivery of health information in the United States and also in other countries. This study explores Twitter content from the CDCs in South Korea and the United States by comparing health communication messages in terms of cultural differences. The study found significant differences in communicating health in terms of frequently mentioned health topics, use of collective words, presence of authority figures, and the frequency of communicationwith the public. The study also indicates that economic as well as cultural factors influence the CDCs’ health communication. Overall, the study suggests how and how often the CDCs communicate may be associated with the two countries’ public health systems and surveillance in each country. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed.

LAURA SMITH

After presenting during the Broadcast Education Association's Assessment Bootcamp this spring, Laura was invited to submit an article for this summer's edition of Journal of Media Education. This case study talks about the types of statistics used in UofSC's assessment plan as well as places where qualitative prose has proven useful in the past.

Citation: Smith, L.K. (2020, July). Assessment for people who hate statistics: Quantitative tools for the qualitative faculty (A Case Study). Journal of Media Education, 11 (3), pp. 38-45.

Link: https://en.calameo.com/read/0000917891144d87b4c6d

OTHER WORK & RECOGNITION

CHRISTINA MYERS and KEISA GUNBY (SJMC graduate students)

Christina Myers and Keisa Gunby were selected to be 2020 AEJMC Presidential Graduate Fellows, which includes attending a Presidential Diversity & Inclusion Career Development Workshop this year at the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication (AEJMC) Conference.

ERIC ROBINSON

The Communications Lawyer, published by the American Bar Association's Forum on Communications Law, has published a review of my book, “Reckless Disregard: St. Amant v. Thompson and the Transformation of Libel Law.”

Citation: Cynthia Counts, Reckless Disregard Brings Case Out from Sullivan’s Shadow, 35 Communications Lawyer 3:21 (Summer 2020).

Link: Article

FEILI TU-KEEFNER

Feili’s research, "Disseminating reliable information in times of disaster," was featured in the July 2020 issue of the E4GDH Newsletter published by the International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions Evidence for Global and Disaster Health Special Interest Group. In times of crisis, libraries may aid in disaster preparedness, response, and recovery. Librarian first responders need to provide situation-specific and community-first information services to their communities when they are particularly vulnerable. However, although the public libraries and librarians rose to the occasion, they were not well prepared to identify, gather, distribute, and promote the use of disaster and health information to adults, especially in multiple languages and through online venues.

Link: Article

AWARDS AND GRANTS

AMIR KARAMI

Amir Karami received an NSF XSEDE Startup computational infrastructure fund for his COVID-19 grant. The allocation of these resources represents a considerable investment by the NSF in advanced computing infrastructure. 

JUNGMI JUN

Jun received the 2020 Innovative Pedagogy Grant from the Center for Teaching Excellence. The funds will be used to transform International Public Relations from a traditional to hybrid course format. The proposed course aims to (1) diversify delivery methods of lectures and course materials (2) personalize topics, activities, and assessment methods to best serve students' interests and preferences, and (3) empower students to become active creators of knowledge and digital content on issues of international PR and activism. 

KEVIN HULL, KIRSTIN PELLIZZARO, DENETRA WALKER (Ph.D. student) and MILES ROMNEY (former SJMC faculty)

This paper won the TOP FACULTY+STUDENT PAPER award in the Sports Communication Interest Group for the AEJMC 2020 conference. By winning this award, the paper is automatically accepted to the Journal of Sports Media, which is one of the top journals in the sports communication field.

Citation: Hull, K., Romney, M., Pellizzaro, K., & Walker, D. (2020) “It’s Impossible:” Local Sports Broadcasters and the Prospect of Motherhood [Paper presentation]. Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communications (AEJMC) 103rd Annual Conference (Sports Communication Interest Group), San Francisco, CA.

Abstract: Local sports broadcasters work long hours, make little money, and often perform a host of different tasks in the newsroom and out in the field. Add the prospect of also being a mother, the job can seem impossible. A survey of local female sports broadcasters throughout the United States found that the majority of them have delayed starting a family due to their perceptions of work requirements and worry about their employment if they became pregnant. 

LINWAN WU and TAYLOR WEN

This paper won Second place in the Communication Technology Division’s Top Faculty Research Paper Competition at the Annual Conference of AEJMC 2020.

Citation: Wu, L., & Wen, T. J. (2020 August). Understanding AI advertising from the consumer perspective: What factors determine consumers’ appreciation of AI-created advertisements? Paper accepted to present at the 2020 AEJMC Annual Conference (online), Communication Technology Division.

Abstract: This study tested a conceptual model that examined some influential factors of consumers’ overall appreciation of AI-created advertisements. The findings indicated that consumers’ perceived objectivity of the process of advertising creation positively influenced machine heuristics which benefited their appreciation of AI-created advertisements, but negatively influenced perceived eeriness which jeopardized that appreciation. Consumers’ feelings of uneasiness with robots were found to positively influence both machine heuristic and perceived eeriness of AI advertising.


CONFERENCE PAPERS

AMIR KARAMI and FRANK WEBB (Honors College)

Amir Karami and his undergraduate student will present "LGBT in Social Media: Comparing Health Tweets of LGB and Transgender Individuals" at a conference hosted by MIT (acceptance rate: 40%).

LINWAN WU and JACKSON CARTER (Ph.D. student)

I’d rather hear it from a robot: How audio voice drive preferences for AI-powered audio messages? Paper accepted to present at the 2020 AEJMC Annual Conference in the Communication Technology Division.

Citation: Carter, J., & Wu, L. (2020 August). I’d rather hear it from a robot: How audio voice drive preferences for AI-powered audio messages? Paper accepted to present at the 2020 AEJMC Annual Conference (online), Communication Technology Division. 

KEVIN HULL, KIRSTIN PELLIZZARO, DENETRA WALKER (Ph.D. student) and MILES ROMNEY (former SJMC faculty)

Previous research has demonstrated that Black athletes are often stereotyped negatively by the (mostly white) sports media. In this study we spoke with only Black local sportscasters who revealed that they agree that Black athletes are often stereotyped and that they believe they have an easier time relating to and telling the story of athletes that are of their race. Research paper accepted for presentation at AEJMC 2020 in the Minorities and Communication Division.

Citation: Hull, K., Walker, D., Romney, M., & Pellizzaro, K. (2020). “Through Our Prism:” A Survey of Black Local Sportscasters’ Views and Interactions with Black Athletes [Paper presentation]. Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communications (AEJMC) 103rd Annual Conference (Minorities and Communication Division), San Francisco, CA.

Abstract: Black local sports broadcasters throughout the United States were surveyed to discover how they view media treatment of, and their own interactions with, Black athletes. Results demonstrate that the majority feel the athletes are negatively stereotyped and that, as Black journalists, they have an easier time relating to and telling the story of the Black athlete.

BROOKE MCKEEVER, ROBERT MCKEEVER, MINHEE CHOI (May 2020 Ph.D. graduate), SHUDAN HUANG (Ph.D. student)

“From Advocacy to Activism: Scale Development of Behavioral Steps,” was accepted for presentation in the Public Relations Division at the 2020 AEJMC Conference in San Francisco, CA (now virtual). This research was funded by a grant from the Arthur W. Page Center for Integrity in Public Communication at Penn State University.

Citation: McKeever, B.W., McKeever, R., Choi, M., Huang, S. (2020). From Advocacy to Activism: Scale Development of Behavioral Steps. Paper accepted for presentation at the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communications (AEJMC) annual conference (Public Relations Division), San Francisco, CA.

Abstract: Although advocacy and activism have gained increasing importance, conceptual definitions and valid measurement of the concepts are lacking. By searching the literature, seeking expert feedback, and employing two survey data sets (N= 1,300) for scale development, this study advances a new measurement model of behavioral outcomes that can be useful for future research as well as practice. Findings indicate six dimensions of advocacy and activism. Theoretical, methodological, and practical implications are discussed. 


JOURNAL ARTICLES

TAYLOR WEN

Citation: Wen, Taylor Jing (forthcoming), “Congruity between Mood and Brand Involvement Enhances the Effectiveness of Message Appeals: Dual Processing Model Perspective,” Journal of Marketing Communications.

Abstract: This research examined how mood, brand involvement, and message appeals interacted with each other; and how this interaction influenced consumers’ evaluation of advertisements. Results showed that people with higher brand involvement processed information systematically, and the presence of a negative mood encouraged them to process information systematically to a greater extent. Hence, people with higher brand involvement in a negative mood evaluated functional ads more favorably. In contrast, people with lower brand involvement processed information heuristically, and the presence of a positive mood enhanced heuristic processing. Therefore, people with lower brand involvement in a positive mood evaluated experiential ads more positively. Theoretical and practical implications are also discussed. 

AMIR KARAMI, GABRIELLE TURNER-MCGRIEVY, COURTNEY MONROE and HEATHER M. BRANDT (Arnold School of Public Health)

Through a collaboration with the Arnold School of Public Health, Amir Karami published a paper in Natural Hazards (IF: 2.604 & H-Index: 87) on analyzing food discussions in more than 500,000 tweets posted before, during, and after four hurricanes (e.g., “Hurricane Florence”).

Citation: Turner-McGrievy, G., Karami, A., Monroe, C. et al. Dietary pattern recognition on Twitter: A case example of before, during, and after four natural disasters. Natural Hazards (2020).

CLAYTON COPELAND AND KIM THOMPSON

Citation: Copeland, C. A., Cross, B., & Thompson, K. M. (2020). Universal design creates equity and inclusion: Moving from theory to practice. South Carolina Libraries, 4(1). 

Abstract: Universal design focuses on small changes that can be made to benefit everyone. Universal design principles can be applied to both physical and virtual environments and help provide universal access to technology and information. This paper provides a case study of the design of a library computer kiosk in an academic library, using principles of universal design to create a universally accessible workstation. The paper provides an overview of features included in the workstation, images of the workstation, and includes discussion of additional considerations and lessons learned from the design experience. 

LINWAN WU and TAYLOR WEN

Citation: Dodoo, N. A., Wen, T. J., & Wu, L. (2020). Unguarded against Persuasion and Willing to Share: The Combined Effect of Chronic Regulatory Focus and Disclosure Language on Consumer Responses to Native Advertising. Journal of Interactive Advertising. DOI: 10.1080/15252019.2020.1773353

Abstract: While disclosure has been largely investigated within existing native advertising research, consumers’ individual characteristics which may influence the persuasion process have not received sufficient academic attention in this area. Through online experiments, this research examined the interplay between chronic regulatory focus and disclosure language on consumer responses to native advertising across two studies. The results from Study 1 indicated that participants with a strong promotion focus were less cognizant of the commercial nature of the native ad when exposed to a native ad using an implicit disclosure label rather than one using an explicit disclosure label. More importantly, in Study 1, these participants expressed a stronger intention to share a native ad using an implicit disclosure label rather than one using an explicit disclosure label whereas prevention-focused people reacted to native advertisements with an explicit label more positively than one using an implicit label. Study 2 further suggested that perceived persuasion intent could be the potential underlying mechanism that explained such an interaction effect. Theoretical and practical contributions of these findings are discussed.


OTHER ACTIVITIES

JUNGMI JUN

Jun was accepted as one of the Kopenhaver Center Fellows. She will join the 2020 cohort and be part of the AEJMC pre-convention workshop, Women Faculty Moving Forward: 100 Years from Suffrage to Academic Leadership, organized and sponsored by the Lillian Lodge Kopenhaver Center for the Advancement of Women in Communication.

AWARDS AND GRANTS

LUCY SANTOS GREEN and JENNA SPIERING

We were awarded the 2020 Takeshi Murofushi Research Award by the International Association of School Librarians (IASL). This is a monetary award to fund research that the committee determined will have a global impact on school librarianship. Although an annual competition, the last time a project was awarded was 2016! The awarded research project will examine international school library research over a 5-year time span to identify critical needs in research on LGBTQIA+ topics. This will be an international effort examining research published in the International Federation of Library Association's seven official languages (Arabic, Chinese, English, French, German, Russian, and Spanish).

JUNGMI JUN

Jungmi Jun received COVID-19 Research Initiative Funding. She will conduct research on Asian Americans' COVID-19 related discrimination experience, communicative coping, and activism.

Citation: Jungmi Jun (PI). When Do Victims Become Activists? Asian Americans’ Experience with COVID-19 Related Discrimination, Communicative Coping Strategies, and Engagement in Activism. The Office of Research.

Abstract: Due to the origin of COVID-19, racist/xenophobia attacks and discrimination against Chinese and Asian Americans have radically increased. We propose to investigate Asian Americans’ COVID-19 related discrimination experience, communicative coping strategies, and engagement in activism in the victim and the bystander perspective. Online surveys will be conducted with Asian American victims and bystanders across the U.S. Structural equation modeling (SEM), statistical analysis, and qualitative textual analysis will be mixed. The findings will guide efforts to combat discrimination against racial/ethnic groups, share effective communication strategies for victims during coping, and empower victims and bystanders.

AMIR KARAMI and MELISSA NOLAN (Arnold School of Public Health)

In a collaboration with the Arnold School of Public Health, Dr. Karami was awarded the COVID-19 Research Initiative grant from the USC Office of Research to explore Diseases and Chemicals in COVID-19 Scholarly Articles with Data Science Techniques. This study will use computational methods to identify patterns between and within diseases and chemicals in more than 47,000 research papers. 

EHSAN MOHAMMADI, ROBERT MCKEEVER and BROOKE MCKEEVER

Our proposal titled, “Detecting and Investigating COVID-19 Misleading Information on YouTube,” was awarded a COVID-19 Research Initiative grant from the UofSC Office of Research.

Abstract: During the COVID-19 pandemic, people have increasingly looked online for information on how to protect themselves and their loved ones from the virus. YouTube is one of the most popular sites for such information. This research will use a new automatic method to identify COVID-19 videos on YouTube and utilize different sources of data to study the features of misleading and non-misleading information in a systematic way. Results can be shared with academic and general publics, as well as with the medical community, strategic and health communicators who may be creating health-related content to be shared on YouTube in the future.


CONFERENCE PRESENTATIONS AND PANELS

LUCY SANTOS GREEN and MELISSA P. JOHNSTON (University of West Georgia)

Dr. Green and her co-researcher, Dr. Johnston, were selected to present their paper, "Educating Future LIS Scholars and Professionals on Ethical Publishing Policy for Scholarly Research," at the 2020 Association for Library and Information Science Education Conference. ALISE 2020 will be held October 20-23, 2020 in Pittsburgh, PA.

Citation: Green, L., & Johnston, M. (October 2020). Educating future LIS scholars and professionals on ethical publishing policy for scholarly research. Association for Library and Information Science Education Conference, Pittsburgh, PA.

LUCY SANTOS GREEN and MELISSA P. JOHNSTON (University of West Georgia)

I will be presenting at the International Association of School Librarians conference with my co-researcher Dr. Melissa P. Johnston as part of our work on the $400,000 IMLS funded grant project, REALISD (Rural Engagement to Advance Learning in STEM Digitally). The name of the presentation is "Supporting STEM Education in the School Library with Digital Tools."

LUCY SANTOS GREEN

I will be presenting a professional paper and session at the International Association for School Librarians 2021 conference. The topic is "Achieving Transformational Change in the School Library Program." The IASL 2021 Conference will be July 16-20, 2021 in Denton, TX. Past conferences have been held in Moscow, Russia, Tokyo, Japan, San Jose, California, and most recently, Dubrovnik, Croatia.

Abstract: Building on the IASL 2020 conference’s goal “to explore and discuss ideas for transforming school library programs,” the objective of this presentation is to introduce attendees to Organizational Development Intervention (ODI) theory as it applies to K-12 settings. Session participants will investigate how ODI can help school librarians explore their school’s current culture, categorize the types of changes that need to take place, and identify the existing barriers and challenges to those changes. This session will also delve into the ways ODI defines and differentiates between first- and second-order changes. A highly interactive approach will be used to introduce participants to guidelines for appropriately framing their change expectations, and setting achievable goals that lead to transformational change in school library programs.

KAREN GAVIGAN, DANIELLA COOK (UofSC College of Education), KIRA DUKE and LAYLA SMALLWOOD (Middle Tennessee State University)

Civil Rights through the Lenses of Gender, Ethnicity, Courts, and Institutions Presentation at the Online Conference of the National Council for History Education (NCHE)

Abstract: Presenters demonstrated effective, student-centered approaches for using a range of Library of Congress primary sources to understand and teach civil rights history more critically and help students do the same. Daniella Ann Cook and Karen Gavigan explored using a variety of primary sources to engage students in historical inquiry of the Civil Rights struggle through six lenses: women, youth, organizing, culture, institutional racism and the interconnectedness of social movements. Kira Duke and Layla Smallwood examined the struggle for full citizenship by minority groups such as African Americans, women and Native Americans between 1865 and 1965, using Constitutional amendments, court cases, political cartoons, and other primary source documents.


CREATIVE PRODUCTION:

NICOLE COOKE, CHRISTINE SHELEK, VALERIE BYRD-FORT and LIZ HARTNETT

The Inaugural Augusta Baker Lecture took place on April 24, 2020. This online event attracted 263 people to hear Dr. Ebony Elizabeth Thomas talk about the need to imagine and implement diversity in children's literature. Dr. Thomas' latest book is titled "The Dark Fantastic." The lecture and the Augusta Baker Endowed Chair honors Augusta Braxton Baker, a legendary and beloved children’s librarian and storyteller who made South Carolina her home after a 37-year career at the New York Public Library. This event was co-sponsored by South Carolina Humanities, a not‐for‐profit organization; inspiring, engaging and enriching South Carolinians with programs on literature, history, culture, and heritage.


JOURNAL ARTICLES

AMIR KARAMI, MORGAN LAUNDY (SLIS and English Department) and FRAN WEBB (UofSC Honors College)

Published in the IEEE Access Journal (Impact Factor: 4.098) through a collaboration with Swansea University (UK), Dr. Karami and his graduate and undergraduate students applied computational methods to investigate more than 18,000 Twitter-related research papers to disclose topics and explore their trends during the last decade.

Citation: A. Karami, M. Lundy, F. Webb, Y. K. Dwivedi. (2020), "Twitter and Research: A Systematic Literature Review Through Text Mining," in IEEE Access.

JUNGMI JUN, LINWAN WU and TAYLOR WEN

Citation: Jun, J., Wu, L., & Wen, J. (in press). Interaction effects of self vs. group affirmation and message framing on college students’ vape-free campus policy support. Health Communication.

Abstract: A growing number of American colleges and universities became vape-free campuses in response to the high e-cigarette use prevalence among young adults. However, little is known about communication/psychological factors associated with campus members’ support for a tobacco policy prohibiting e-cigarette use on the campus (vape-free campus policy support). The present study explores the main and interaction effects of affirmation and message framing on the vape-free campus policy support among college students who vary in their vaping status (vapers vs. non-vapers). We conducted a computer-based experiment with a two (affirmation: self vs. group) by two (message framing: gain vs. loss) by two (vaping status: currently vaping vs. not vaping) between-subjects design. Our analysis indicated that self-affirmation demonstrates superior potency compared to group-affirmation in increasing vape-free campus policy support. The main effects of message framing as well as interactions between framing and affirmation were not statistically significant. A notable finding was the three-way interaction effect among affirmation, framing, and vaping status. The level of policy support increased the most when vapers were self-affirmed and exposed to a gain-framed message. For non-vapers, the level of policy support was the highest when they were self-affirmed and exposed to a loss-framed message.

LINWAN WU

Citation: Wu, L., & Dodoo, N. A. (2020). Being Accepted or Ostracized: How Social Experience Influences Consumer Responses to Advertisements with Different Regulatory Focus. Journal of Advertising. DOI: 10.1080/00913367.2020.1743217

Abstract: Social experience (i.e., social inclusion versus exclusion) is an important factor that influences consumer behaviors but has not been adequately examined in advertising research. To fill this gap, we conducted three experiments to investigate how consumers’ social experiences affect their responses to promotion-focused versus prevention-focused advertisements. Our findings indicated that consumers who experienced being included or being ignored responded more favorably to promotion-focused advertisements than prevention-focused advertisements. However, these effects were due to different underlying mechanisms. Consumers who experienced being rejected were indifferent to advertisements’ regulatory focus, but they preferred promotion-focused advertisements once they received a self-esteem boost. These findings are believed to provide meaningful contributions to both advertising research and practice.

CONFERENCE PAPERS

KIRSTIN PELLIZARO, KEVIN HULL and CHRISTINA MYERS (Ph.D. Student)

Fragmentation of Self-Presentation? How Broadcast Journalists use Different Online Platforms to Promote Their Brand. Paper accepted for presentation at Broadcast Education Association (BEA) 2020 Conference in Las Vegas.

Abstract: Studies analyzing journalists’ self-presentation and branding on social media, specifically Twitter, have shown many use the platforms not only to disseminate their professional work, but also as a means to distinguish themselves from the pack. Building a relationship with a viewing audience through traditional mediums such as television and radio has shifted to a need to engage and cultivate an online following as a means for journalists to leverage their likability and promote themselves strategically. Increased organizational pressures compound the need for journalists to participate in branding activities that develop their professional identities online. However, with the multitude of platforms for which a journalist must maintain an audience, and each platform having different uses and audiences, are journalists presenting themselves differently across platforms? The purpose of this study is to examine self-presentation of journalists across their professional online platforms to determine whether there are any deviations or fragmentation in how they present themselves to an online audience. While previous studies have analyzed Twitter or Facebook social media activity of journalists separately, this study will examine the biographies of the broadcast journalists’ Twitter, Facebook and Instagram pages, as well as their station’s website bio page. This analysis is needed to capture the full scope of the conceptual framework of journalists’ online identity and self-presentation to their online audience.

Citation: Pellizzaro, K., Hull, K., Myers, C. (2020). Broadcast Journalists’ Self-Presentation and Social Media: Changes in Branding Dependent on Platform. Paper accepted for presentation at BEA 2020 Conference.

KIRSTIN PELLIZARO

Controlling Personal Narratives While Balancing Professional Branding: Decisions and Motivations Behind Broadcast Journalists’ Health Disclosures. Paper accepted for presentation at the Broadcast Education Association (BEA) 2020 conference in Las Vegas.

Abstract: Broadcast journalists often report on people dealing with illness or physical hardship. But what happens when journalists personally experience those types of issues? This Research-In-Progress explores the decision-making and motives behind how and why local and national broadcasters share managing their lives with illness and hardship with online followers, as well as the influences over message construction. The research to date—analysis of over 1,000 personal health disclosures made by 24 television journalists on multiple media platforms—has unveiled a struggle between personal expression to maintain authenticity and transparency with an audience, while also preserving professional expression of journalistic personas that were constructed prior to the illness. Thematic analysis found journalists performed three acts when sharing personal health and hardship information online: they reported on their illness, they were transparent, and they justified their actions—leading to implication and consequences over shared content. Within the three themes, a range of expression—from personal to professional—and influences over content were found. With analysis of the online content completed—and qualitative interviews in the beginning stages—it is already clear the decision-making process for broadcasters in these cases is complex. The findings point to a complicated struggle to both maintain a professional self and persona, while also understanding the need to connect with the audience. This type of deeply personal experience in many ways connects both the professional and the personal aspects of the lives of television journalists, adding to the understanding of the emotional labor involved within this profession.

Citation: Pellizzaro, K. & Liseblad, M. (2020). Broadcast Journalists and Their Health Disclosures: Qualitative Interviews Revealing Influences and Emotional Labor involved in the process. Paper accepted for presentation at the Broadcast Education Association (BEA) 2020 conference in Las Vegas.

VANESSA KITZIE, TRAVIS WAGNER and NICK VERA

Citation: Kitzie, V., Wagner, T. L., & Vera, A. N. (2020). “In the Beginning, It Was Little Whispers... Now, We’re Almost a Roar:” Conceptualizing a Model for Community and Self in LGBTQ+ Health Information Practices. iConference 2020 Proceedings.

Abstract: Although LGBTQ+ populations experience significant health challenges, little research exists that investigates their health from an informational perspective. Our study addresses this gap by exploring the health information practices of LGBTQ+ communities in South Carolina, focusing on how sociocultural context shapes these practices. Thirty semi-structured interviews with South Carolina LGBTQ+ community leaders analyzed using open qualitative coding informed the development of a conceptual framework describing their information practices. Findings show that participants engaged in two broad types of practices – protective and defensive – as responses to risks and barriers experienced, which are in turn produced by social and structural factors. Findings advance information practices and marginalization approaches and offer ways for medical professionals to improve service to LGBTQ+ populations.

 

AMIR KARAMI, VICTORIA MONEY (Department of Sociology), and BRIE TURNER-MCGRIEVY (Arnold School of Public Health)

Through a collaboration with Johns Hopkins University, the Arnold School of Public Health, and the UofSC Sociology Department, this paper analyzed more than 500k comments on Reddit to investigate temporal patterns of discussions on diet. This research applied mixed methods using both qualitative and computational approaches to disclose the hidden semantic structure of comments and explore temporal patterns.

Citation: Money V., Karami A., Turner-McGrievy G., Kharrazi H. (2020), Temporal Analysis of Diet Discourses on Reddit, International Conference on Social Media and Society, Chicago, IL. 

AMIR KARAMI and FRANK WEBB (Honors College Student)

Dr. Karami and his undergraduate student compared LGB and transgender individuals based on their health-related comments on Twitter. They have developed a mixed-method framework to collect and investigate thousands of tweets of LGBT users.

Citation: Webb F., Karami A. (2020), LGBT in Social Media: Comparing Health Tweets of LGBand Transgender Individuals, International Conference on Social Media and Society, Chicago, IL.

SHANNON BOWEN

Citation: Birmingham, B., & Bowen, S. A. (2020, March). Perceptions of Social Responsibility: Traditional CSR or A Portion-of-Profits Scheme? Paper presented at the International Public Relations Research Conference, Orlando.

GRANTS

SHANNON BOWEN

Bowen, S. A. (2020, July). Global Carolina Faculty International Travel Grant. Combining moral philosophies of east and west for use in political communication: A new framework for moral analyses. 26th World Congress of Political Science, Lisbon, Portugal. University of South Carolina; $2,000.

SHANNON BOWEN

Bowen, S. A. & Neill, M. S. (2020). Ethical organizational listening for stakeholder engagement and responsibility in issues management. Grant awarded from the Arthur W. Page Center for Integrity in Public Communication at Penn State University; $5,000.

JOURNAL ARTICLES

ERIC ROBINSON and YICHENG ZHU (Ph.D. Alumnus)

This article, published in Social Media + Society, examines the effectiveness of rewriting web sites' terms of service in "plain English" in order to make them more understandable to users.

Abstract: Whether they know it or not, the legal rights and responsibilities of users of websites and services, including social media, are defined and controlled by the terms of service of these online service providers. But despite the importance of these provisions, studies have shown that users rarely review terms of service, or think about their meaning. This study took advantage of a major website’s “simplification” of its terms of service to determine whether the changed language increased users’ understanding of the intended meaning of the terms of service. Using the Elaboration Likelihood Model, we evaluate the effectiveness of simplification of terms of service as a method to encourage users’ understanding on these terms.

Citation: Robinson, E. and Zhu, Y. (2020). Beyond “I Agree”: Users’ Understanding of Web Site Terms of Service, Social Media + Society.

VANESSA KITZIE

Citation: Radford, M.L., Kitzie, V., Mikitish, S., Floegel, D., Radford, G., & Connaway, L.S. (in press). “People are reading your work:” Scholarly identity and social networking sites. Journal of Documentation.

Abstract: Scholarly identity refers to endeavors by scholars to promote their reputation, work, and networks using online platforms such as ResearchGate, Academia.edu, and Twitter. This exploratory research investigates benefits and drawbacks of Scholarly Identity efforts and avenues for potential library support. Data from 30 semi-structured phone interviews with faculty, doctoral students, and academic librarians were qualitatively analyzed using the constant comparisons method (Charmaz, 2014) and Goffman’s (1959, 1967) theoretical concept of impression management. Results reveal that use of online platforms enables academics to connect with others and disseminate their research. Scholarly Identity platforms have benefits, opportunities, and offer possibilities for developing academic library support. They are also fraught with drawbacks/concerns, especially related to confusion, for-profit models, and reputational risk. This exploratory study involves analysis of a small number of interviews (30) with self-selected social scientists from one discipline (communication) and librarians. It lacks gender, race/ethnicity, and geographical diversity and focuses exclusively on individuals who use social networking sites for their Scholarly Identity practices. Results highlight benefits and risks of Scholarly Identity work and the potential for adopting practices that consider ethical dilemmas inherent in maintaining an online social media presence. They suggest continuing to develop library support that provides strategic guidance and information on legal responsibilities regarding copyright. This research aims to understand the benefits and drawbacks of Scholarly Identity platforms and explore what support academic libraries might offer. It is among the first to investigate these topics comparing perspectives of faculty, doctoral students, and librarians.

AMIR KARAMI

Amir Karami published a paper in the First Monday Journal (Impact Factor: 1.38, H Index = 63). A team of collaborators from Syracuse University, UNC-Chapel Hill, and UofSC analyzed a set of Twitter hashtags to ascertain how contemporary parlance in social media can illuminate the rich cultural intersections between modern forms of work, use of technology, and physical mobility.

Citation: Hemsley, J., Erickson, I., Jarrahi, M. H., & Karami, A. (2020). Digital nomads, coworking, and other expressions of mobile work on Twitter. First Monday.

KIM THOMPSON, CLAYTON COPELAND and BRADY CROSS (MLIS Alumna)

Citation: Copeland, C. A., Cross, B., & Thompson, K. M. (2020). Universal design creates equity and inclusion: Moving from theory to practice. South Carolina Libraries, 4(1).

Abstract: There is a billboard that visually shouts “Unsee this!” at drivers along highways, enticing businesses to rent billboard space, suggesting that some things, once seen, cannot be unseen. Once researchers, practitioners, and students “see” inclusion as core to their field, workplace, and daily life, it is difficult to “unsee,” these basic principles in practice. Librarians have an opportunity – and a responsibility – to ensure that these principles and practices of Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion (EDI) lead our work. This article discusses universal access and design as approaches for helping to ensure EDI in libraries, including EDI in technology purchases and implementation.

KIM THOMPSON

The focus of the article is description of LIS articles indexed in Web of Science, with a particular look at international and interdisciplinary collaboration.

Citation: Thompson, K. M., Garrison, K., Santelices, C., Arellano, P., & Reyes, D. (in press). “Library Science” literature in Web of Science: What a decade tells us about the field. eCiencias de la Información, 10(2).

Abstract: Ensuring access to published research is increasingly important for demonstrating research impact, supporting wide readership, creating interest in collaboration, and making way for funding opportunities. This article provides a bibliometric analysis of publications from 2007-2016 in the Web of Science (WOS) database to update understanding of recent international library science research internationalization as a means of discussing research impact and collaboration. The methodology is a descriptive analysis of publications retrieved from the WOS database using keywords “library science” and WOS-generated subject heading “Information Science Library Science.” Analysis focused on descriptive data related to our research questions including representation of countries, languages, and journals. The findings reveal that most publications are published by researchers with institutional affiliations in the United States and in English. Library and information science research continues to be strong in collaboration, but international and interdisciplinary collaborations are still low in this sample. The dataset reflects that co- and multi-authored publications have the highest WOS citation counts, reinforcing the value of scholarly collaboration. This research provides a baseline to chart future growth in Library Science research publications and collaborations.

SHANNON BOWEN

Citation: Erzikova, E. & Bowen, S. A. (2019). Missed opportunities to make P.R. great again: How the public relations industry responded to the Trump presidency. Public Relations Review

PANELS/PRESENTATIONS

ERIC ROBINSON

Eric Robinson presented and led conversation with faculty on legal and ethical issues when discussing controversial and contentious issues in university classes.

Citation: Robinson, E. (2020, Feb. 19). “Discussing Controversial Topics and the Right of Free Speech.” Center for Teaching Excellence, University of South Carolina, Columbia, S.C.

OTHER PUBLICATIONS AND MEDIA

SHANNON BOWEN

Citation: Bowen, S. A., & Lovari, A. (2020). Crisis Management. In P. Harris, A. Bitonti, C. Fleisher, A. Skorkjær Binderkrantz (eds). The Palgrave Encyclopedia of Interest Groups, Lobbying and Public Affairs (pp. 1-10). Cham: Springer International Publishing.

ERIC ROBINSON

Eric Robinson was quoted in a news article.

Citation: Brown, A. (2020, Mar. 1). SC court records involving Trump staffer Mick Mulvaney are being shielded from the public, Post & Courier, Charleston, S.C.

CONFERENCE PAPERS

CARMEN MAYE
Paper accepted for presentation at 70th annual conference of the International Communication Association (ICA). Gold Coast, Australia, 21-25 May 2020.

Citation: Maye, C (2020). I'll rumble for ya: Toward a theory of agency to aid in distinguishing incitement to violence from fighting words. Accepted for presentation at the 70th annual conference of the International Communication Association (ICA). 

HOLLY OVERTON
This research examines why individuals share misinformation on social media, even when they know it is inaccurate. We find that people do this for self-protection and self-enhancement.

Citation: Yang, F., & Overton, H.K. (2020, May). Information as self-construction: Motivations in (mis)information sharing on social media. Paper accepted for presentation at the International Communication Association (ICA) annual conference, Mass Communication Division, Gold Coast, AUS.

Abstract: This study examines the intrinsic psychological motives that underscore individuals’ decisions to share misinformation on social media. A 2 (personal relevance: low vs. high) x 2 (anxiety: low vs. high) x 2 (news source credibility: low vs. high) x 2 (dispute on news: absent vs. present) x 2 (need for self-validation: no or yes) factorial online experiment was conducted. Findings suggest individuals share misinformation for self-protection and self-enhancement. Implications for theory and practice are discussed.

HOLLY OVERTON and FRANK DARDIS (Ph.D. Alumnus)
Citation: Dardis, F.E., Haigh, M.M., Overton, H.K., & Bailey, E.J. (2020, March). Communicating CSR fit: How message-framing strategies and specific elements of a company-cause relationship can enhance consumer perceptions of the corporation. Paper accepted for presentation at the International Public Relations Research Annual Conference, Orlando, FL.

Abstract: The current experiment examined the effects of CSR fit and message-framing strategies on corporate perceptions. A high fit outperformed a low fit on multiple key outcomes. However, episodic framing of the CSR initiative enhanced corporate perceptions in a low-fit condition among consumers who generally value CSR practices.

TAYLOR WEN, CHANG WON CHOI (Ph.D. Student), and LINWAN WU
This paper will be presented in 2020 American Academy of Advertising Annual Conference, San Diego, CA, in March. The current study empirically tested the role of emotions in influencing share and purchase intentions in the context of viral advertising. The results demonstrated that increased levels of Pleasure, Arousal, and Dominance resulted in greater intention to share the video ads, and such an intention to share eventually triggered greater intention to purchase the products featured in the ads. 

Citation: Wen, T. J., Choi, C.W., & Wu, L. (2020, March). The Contagious Emotions: Positive, Arousing and Empowering Emotions Determine Share and Purchase Intentions in Viral Advertising. American Academy of Advertising Annual Conference, San Diego, CA.

Abstract: The current study adopts the theoretical framework of three-factor theory of emotions (i.e., Pleasure-Arousal-Dominance) to empirically test the role of emotions in influencing share and purchase intentions in the context of viral advertising. The results confirmed the positive role of Pleasure, Arousal, and Dominance in spreading the viral video commercials. More importantly, the results demonstrated that Dominance emerged as the strongest predictor among the three dimensions to explain the increased share intention. In addition, the intention to share mediated the effects of three emotional dimensions on purchase intention. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed.

TAYLOR WEN
This paper will be presented in American Academy of Advertising Annual Conference, San Diego, CA, in March. Computer vision tools were used to analyze hundreds of social media brand images to predict people's perceptions of brand personality. The findings of this study provided insightful findings to predict what visual components/features should be utilized for produce and shape a brand's image.

Citation: Wen, T. J., Yang, J., & Peng, Y. (2020, March). Predicting Brand Personality: The Role of Computer Vision Features in Social Media Branded Content. American Academy of Advertising Annual Conference, San Diego, CA.

Abstract: With the assistance of computer vision, the present study analyzed the visual features of 700 images randomly selected from seven lifestyle brands’ Instagram accounts. These visual features were categorized into three major sets: discrete colors (e.g., red, yellow, blue, etc.), overall visual characteristics (i.e., hue, brightness, and colorfulness), and visual complexity (i.e., feature complexity, compositional complexity, and color variety). We then correlated these visual features with perceived brand personality from responses of over 1,500 participants and were able to identify some significant predictors of each of the five brand personality respectively. This paper aims to make theoretical, methodological and practical contributes to the current advertising and brand management literature.

TAYLOR WEN and JACKSON CARTER (Ph.D. Student)
This paper was accepted and will be presented at the American Academy of Advertising Annual Conference, San Diego, CA.

Citation: Carter, J., Wen, T. J., & Ham, C. D. (2020, March). The Effects of Affect: The Influence of Mood and Arousal on Processing Search Engine Result Page Snippets. American Academy of Advertising Annual Conference, San Diego, CA.

Abstract: Although researchers have produced a significant amount of work on the effects of mood and arousal on information processing, little in the way of research that applies this process and search advertising exists. This study aims to help start the process of chipping away in this literature gap by examining interaction of mood and arousal with information processing on search engines, specifically through the lens of SERP snippets. The results of this study show an interaction between mood, arousal, and the number of results on a page, as well as preliminary data on the preferences of specific snippets shown through click-through-rates. Referring back to the previous literature, the findings of this study are consistent with HSM research with those in positive moods being more prone to using global processing and those in negative moods being more prone to using systematic processing.

TAYLOR WEN and CHRIS NOLAND (Ph.D. Student)

This paper will be presented at the 2020 American Academy of Advertising Annual Conference, San Diego, CA, in March. Mood states, arousal level, and native ad presentation format can have strong effects on brand attitude and information seeking behavior. The study adds to a growing body of research on native advertising as well as research on consumer psychology. There are many avenues available should others decide to pursue future research. Understanding the way mood and arousal interact with native advertisement format has theoretical implications for consumer behavior research and also important practical implications for advertising and marketing professionals.

Citation: Noland, C., & Wen, T. J. (2020, March). Native ad styles: How do mood and arousal interact with listicle and narrative advertisements to enhance brand outcomes. American Academy of Advertising Annual Conference, San Diego, CA.

Abstract: An experiment was conducted to examine the interplay between mood, arousal, and native ad type (listicle and narrative). Results suggest that people in a positive mood and a low level of arousal have more favorable brand attitudes and information seeking behavior when exposed to native advertisements in a listicle format. People in a negative mood and a low level of arousal have more favorable brand attitudes and information seeking behaviors with native advertisements presented in a narrative format. Additionally the study identified brand attitude as an underlying mechanism to explain interaction effects on information seeking. 

CREATIVE PRODUCTIONS

 SABRINA HABIB and JEFF WILLIAMS
Those Lonely Minutes – Short Film

A woman finds out that her nightmares about aliens were a real experience…or were they? An experimental short film created in collaboration among faculty from UofSC and Winthrop University.

Film Festivals: Planet 9. Los Angeles, CA (2020). Underexposed Film Festival YC. Rock Hill, SC (2020). Brightside Tavern Shorts Film Festival. NJ, (2020). Experimental Forum. Los Angeles, CA (2019).​

GRANTS

HOLLY OVERTON and ANLI XIAO
Holly Overton and Anli Xiao received a grant from the Glen M. Broom Center for Professional Development in Public Relations, housed at San Diego State University, as part of the Broom Initiative. This study aims to further disentangle the concept of corporate social advocacy (CSA) by examining the relationship between perceived motives and an individual’s personal values on organization-public relationships (OPR). The researchers will conduct a survey to examine the impact of companies’ CSA efforts on longer term, relational aspects with stakeholders.

JOURNAL ARTICLES

DARIN FREEBURG
Darin Freeburg developed a model for organization behavior change using theories from several areas, e.g., information science, communications. He implemented the model in a small church that needed to increase giving behaviors. He found that the results were mostly successful.

Citation: Freeburg, D. (2020). An information-based approach to organizational change management. VINE Journal of Information and Knowledge Management Systems, ahead-of-print.

Abstract: Purpose: Though information dissemination is widely viewed within organizations as an outdated method for initiating behavior change, this study aims to suggest that it can still be effective if done strategically. The study proposes and implements the knowing model, which suggests that an individual must be aware of information about a target behavior change, integrate that information as knowledge, and be motivated to act on that knowledge. The study highlights several barriers and strategies for overcoming those barriers.

Design/methodology/approach: The model was implemented in a case study within a religious organization that wanted to increase giving behavior. Leadership and members engaged in several focus groups both before and after a three-month information campaign.

Findings: Results show that members had a better understanding of the target behavior, a gradual shift in beliefs about the target behavior, and an increase in perceived susceptibility to consequences related to inaction. As a result, members and leadership indicated an increase in giving behavior in unexpected and beneficial ways.

Originality/value: The knowing model is a low-resource approach useful as a first step in change management. It is helpful when organizations acknowledge the need for change in a given area without knowing how that change should look.

KIM THOMPSON
Citation: Thompson, K. M. & Paul, A. (2020). Factors of digital inclusion among women: Revisiting India and extending to Chile and Australia for additional analysis. The Library Quarterly, 90(2), 1-16.

Abstract: Digital technology plays an important role in women’s everyday lives. Various factors determine adoption, use, and enjoyment of digital technology by women. Our 2016 Library Quarterly article introduced a qualitative look at women’s adoption and use of digital technologies. The current article is a continuation of the previous study, wherein we interview women in Chile and Australia to examine factors of women’s acceptance of digital technologies for everyday life use identified with the India data. We reflect on the role digital technology plays in women’s everyday lives in these three countries and what cultural factors determine adoption, use, and enjoyment of digital technology, including: digital literacy factors, everyday life factors, professional use factors, time factors, social networking factors, and privacy and security factors. We add two factors to our existing model of digital inclusion: physical access factors and device dependency factors.

LINWAN WU
Citation: Li, Z., Tao, W., & Wu, L. (2020). The price of good friendships: Examining the roles of relationship norms and perceived controllability in service failure encounters. International Journal of Business Communication. DOI: 10.1177/2329488420907119.

Abstract: Despite companies’ efforts to cultivate positive relationships with their consumers, negative relational episodes such as customer service failures are inevitable. This study examines how perceived controllability of a service failure determines responses from consumers who have previously formed quality relationships with the company. Specifically, it distinguishes two types of quality relationships: communal and exchange relationships. It investigates how these two types of relationships interact with different levels of perceived service failure controllability, and collectively influence consumers’ emotional, cognitive, and behavioral responses (i.e., anger, perceived betrayal, and negative WOM intention) to the failure encounters. Results of an online experiment (N = 140) show that consumers experience a greater level of anger and perceived betrayal when they consider the service failure as highly controllable (vs. uncontrollable) by the company. More important, this effect pattern only occurs when prior company-consumer relationships are communal rather than exchange. The results of this study enrich our body of knowledge on the role of company-consumer relationships in service failure encounters and provide useful guidelines for company-consumer relationship development and service failure management and recovery.

JUNGMI JUN and JOON KIM (Ph.D. Student)
Citation: Jun, J. & Kim, J. (2020). Do state regulations on e-cigarettes have impacts on the e-cigarette prevalence? Tobacco Control.

Abstract: Background: We examine the association between five types of state regulations on e-cigarettes (i.e., defining e-cigarettes, special tax, packaging, youth access, and licensure) and initiation and current usage of e-cigarettes in 50 US states and the District of Columbia. Methods: Data came from the 2017 BRFSS (Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System) and the U.S. e-cigarette regulations – 50 state review by the Public Health Law Center. Logistic regressions were used to determine the odds of initiation and current use of e-cigarettes among individuals aged 18-24, 25-34, and the whole sample, adjusting for socio-demographic covariates.

Results: Despite the short history of state laws on e-cigarettes, each of the five state laws was associated with lower odds of initiation and use of e-cigarettes in the whole sample. In the 18-24 age group, only the licensure was associated with lower initiation. In the 25-34 age group, the licensure and taxation were related to lower initiation and current usage. There were significant differences of e-cigarette initiation and usage based on the number of state laws regulating e-cigarettes.

Conclusions: Our analysis indicates the potential of states’ policy efforts to regulate e-cigarettes comprehensively in leading significant changes to e-cigarette prevalence in their populations.

JUNGMI JUN, JOON KIM (Ph.D. Student), MINHEE CHOI (Ph.D. Student), and YUJIN HEO (Ph.D. Student)
Citation: Jun, J., Kim, J., Choi, M., & Heo, Y. (2020). Cancer control continuum in Korean American community newspapers: What is the association with the source nationality – US vs. Korea?? Journal of Racial and Ethnic Disparities. 10.1007/s40615-020-00729-3

Abstract: Prior research suggests that cancer information obtained from Korean American community media, which are the primary health information sources among the population, does not connect to Korean Americans’ increased cancer knowledge or cancer protective/detective behavior. We aim to identify the reason by analyzing cancer type, cancer control continuum, and cancer topic presented in Korean American community newspapers. Additionally, the nationality of news source - US and Korea and its association with the cancer coverage was examined. We found that among articles that cited any source, nearly one third used a source from Korea. The source nationality was associated with cancer coverage. In particular, cancer risk factors and screening were more likely to be discussed when a US source was cited as compared to when no source was cited. Korean sources were never or rarely observed in articles focusing on a few cancer sites (e.g., breast and prostate, which Korean Americans have higher risks compared to native Koreans), cancer preventive behaviors (diet, physical activity, no smoking), and specific cancer detection methods (mammogram, pap-smear). We suggest Korean American media to reflect the cancer priority and information needs among Korean Americans, which are varied from native Koreans, and to acknowledge the differences in cancer prevention and detection guidelines between the U.S. and Korean healthcare systems. Also, the U.S. government should disseminate cancer screening and prevention guidelines, customized to racial/ethnic groups’ cancer prevalence and communication preference. 

HOLLY OVERTON, MINHEE CHOI (Ph.D. Student), JANE WEATHERRED (Ph.D. Alumna) and NANLAN ZHANG (Ph.D. Student)
This study examined Nike's ad featuring Colin Kaepernick. Specifically, we examined how emotions and issue involvement impacted people's behavior intentions based on factors like their attitudes, norms, and how much they felt they had control over their actions. This research was conducted as part of the Public Relations/Strategic Communications Research Group directed by Dr. Overton.

Citation: Overton, H.K., Choi, M., Weatherred, J., & Zhang, N. (in press). Testing the viability of emotions and issue involvement as predictors of CSA response behaviors. Journal of Applied Communication Research.

Abstract: Corporate Social Advocacy (CSA) has become more prominent as companies continue taking stands on politically charged social issues. This study examines emotions and issue involvement as antecedents of theory of planned behavior variables (attitudes, subjective norms, and perceived behavioral control) to predict CSA response behaviors. A survey (N = 373) was conducted to examine the public’s response to a recent CSA example–Nike’s ad campaign featuring Colin Kaepernick. Implications for theory and practice are discussed.

HOLLY OVERTON, QUEENIE LI (Ph.D. Alumna) and NANDINI BHALLA (Ph.D. Alumna)
This study examines public attitudes toward environmental issues by segmenting publics into three different groups: active publics, aware publics, and latent publics. This research was conducted as part of the Public Relations/Strategic Communications Research Group directed by Dr. Overton.

Citation: Li, J-Y., Overton, H.K., & Bhalla, N. (in press). Communicative action and supportive behaviors for environmental CSR practices: An attitude-based segmentation approach.Corporate Communications: An International Journal.

Abstract: This study examines public attitudes toward environmental issues, as well as attitudes toward companies that exert efforts on environmental CSR practices, while seeking to determine whether public segments can be distinguished on the basis of two types of attitudinal factors in terms of communicative action and supporting behavior. 

HOLLY OVERTON and LINWAN WU
This study examined how advertising recognition influences consumer responses to a native ad about proactive or reactive CSR. We found that when people did not recognize the persuasion purpose of native CSR advertising, they expressed more favorable attitudes toward the ad and stronger intention to share the ad when exposed to a native ad about proactive CSR compared to a native ad about reactive CSR. However, responses were similar for both types of CSR when they did recognize the persuasion purpose. 

Citation: Wu, L., & Overton, H.K. (in press). Native CSR advertising: How does advertising recognition influence the public’s response to proactive and reactive CSR? Journal of Advertising Research.

Abstract: This study investigates how advertising recognition influences consumer responses to a native advertisement about proactive or reactive corporate social responsibility (CSR). The results indicate that participants expressed more favorable attitudes and greater word-of-mouth (WOM) intention toward a native advertisement of proactive CSR than reactive CSR only when they did not recognize the persuasion purpose of the native advertisement. This study also confirms perceived manipulativeness as the underlying mechanism of advertising recognition and values-driven motivation as the underlying mechanism of CSR type in the context of native advertising. Theoretical and practical implications of the findings are discussed.

HOLLY OVERTON, JOON KYOUNG (Ph.D. Student), NANDINI BHALLA (Ph.D. Alumna) and QUEENIE LI (Ph.D. Alumna)
This study examines Nike's ad campaign featuring Colin Kaepernick. The researchers found that perceptions of company motives were a determining factor in assessing their attitudes about whether companies should take stances on socio-political issues and the appropriateness of sports becoming a politicized event. This research was conducted as part of the Public Relations/Strategic Communications Research Group led by Dr. Overton.

Citation: Kim, J.K., Overton, H.K., Bhalla, N., & Li, J-Y. (2019). Nike, Colin Kaepernick, and the politicization of sports: Examining perceived organizational motives and consumer responses. Public Relations Review. Advance Online Publication.

Abstract: This study applies arguments from attribution theory to examine the role of perceived motives (values-driven, egoistic-driven, strategic-driven, and stakeholder-driven motives) in developing individuals’ attitudes, positive word-of-mouth (PWOM), and negative word-of-mouth (NWOM) intentions in response to Nike’s 30th Anniversary ad campaign featuring Colin Kaepernick. This study also examines how perceptions of the appropriateness of the politicization of sports moderate these relationships, as well as individual factors that predict people’s assessments of sports as a politicized event. A survey (N=373) was conducted to examine how much people’s perceptions of Nike’s motives for engaging in Corporate Social Advocacy (CSA) guided their responses and the degree to which they were likely to engage in actions. Implications for theory and practice are discussed.

TAYLOR WEN and NANLAN ZHANG (Ph.D. Student)
The current study adds to the growing body of scholarship in health communication that has begun to systematically examine the relationship between message factors and public perceptions of depression. Narrative persuasion and attribution of cause can affect jointly on the public’s attitudes towards patient with depression. Minimizing the effects of stigma associated with depression requires health communicators and practitioners to develop additional strategic plans on designing messages that will be distributed to the public and become cautious of the potential drawbacks of insufficiently developed messages.

Citation: Zhang, Nanlan and Taylor Jing Wen (forthcoming). Exploring the public perception of depression: Interplay between the attribution of cause and narrative persuasion.&n