Stories for Faculty and Staff

A group of students surround the larger-than-life bronze Cocky statue, all of them flashing the spurs up hand sign.

UofSC welcomes increasingly diverse and talented class of students

August 20, 2019, Jeff Stensland

The approximately 8,700 students arriving in Columbia this week are part of the largest pool of new students ever enrolled at the University of South Carolina’s flagship campus. Preliminary enrollment numbers show the university also is increasing in diversity and serving more students from South Carolina than ever before, surpassing last year’s record and setting a new bar for academic achievement.

map of South Carolina with UofSC Alumnni mayor's cities pinned

Keys to the City

August 05, 2019, Craig Brandhorst and Megan Sexton

You don’t need a degree from the University of South Carolina to get elected mayor in the Palmetto State, but it certainly doesn’t hurt. This summer, Carolinian magazine traveled the state, from the Lowcountry to the Upstate, from the Midlands to the Pee Dee, interviewing South Carolina alumni who hold the esteemed office.

portrait of Lee Goodman

The Long Run: Lee Goodman

August 01, 2019, Page Ivey

They arrived in the 1970s, some after serving in Vietnam, some fresh out of high school or college. More than 40 years later, they still come to work at the University of South Carolina — some after officially “retiring.” TIMES spoke with a few of these long-term employees to see what keeps them coming back to work on campus, long after they could have settled into that place in the mountains or that home by the sea.

2015 flood

Disaster research

July 29, 2019, Megan Sexton

From a thousand-year flood to deadly hurricanes, South Carolina is no stranger to disasters. That’s why University of South Carolina researchers are working to better understand why dams fail, how to quickly map disaster areas and ways to improve how people with disabilities navigate natural disasters.

Jay Pou holding horseshoe brick that says his award

Beyond the classroom

July 29, 2019, Caleigh McDaniel

Jay Pou is the recipient of the 2019 M. Stuart Hunter Award for his exceptional teaching skills as a University 101 instructor. His ability to connect with his students and his multimedia approach to teaching helped him gain this recognition.

Daniel Speiser

Eyes of the scallop

July 26, 2019, Megan Sexton

When Daniel Speiser tells people that he studies the structure, function and evolution of eyes, they typically envision two eyes on one head. But Speiser, an assistant professor of biological sciences in the College of Arts and Sciences, specializes in marine invertebrates with many eyes — sometimes hundreds of eyes distributed across their bodies.

Alexandra Vezzetti

First class of UofSC physician assistant graduates helping improve healthcare access

July 19, 2019, Alyssa Yancey

Alexandra Vezzetti was in the first class of physician assistant students at the School of Medicine and the first PA student to rotate through the neurology department at Prisma Health. Department Chair Souvik Sen, M.D., was so impressed with Vezzetti that he hired her, and next month, she’ll become the department’s first physician assistant.

Robert L. Caslen Jr.

Robert L. Caslen Jr.

July 19, 2019

Robert L. “Bob” Caslen Jr., a retired lieutenant general and the former superintendent and president of the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, has been named the 29th president of the University of South Carolina.

Tim Mousseau

Breakthrough Leader: Tim Mousseau

July 12, 2019, Page Ivey

One way or another, most life on Earth is affected when one of humanity’s most volatile inventions — the nuclear power plant — catastrophically fails. Biology professor Tim Mousseau leads a team of researchers studying the impact of radiation released from those disasters on animal life, including insects, birds, dogs and humans who live near the failed power plants.

portrait of Sarah Kelly in the mail room

The Long Run: Sarah Kelly

June 27, 2019, Page Ivey

They arrived in the 1970s, some after serving in Vietnam, some fresh out of high school or college. More than 40 years later, they still come to work at the University of South Carolina — some after officially “retiring.” TIMES spoke with a few of these long-term employees to see what keeps them coming back to work on campus, long after they could have settled into that place in the mountains or that home by the sea.

Front of Lieber College during renovations

Renovation Recap: Lieber College

June 20, 2019, Koby Padgett

The University of South Carolina provides an outstanding atmosphere not only for its students but also for its faculty and staff - often ranking among the best employers in the state. The latest renovation to Lieber College provides much-needed upgrades contribute to the university’s welcoming atmosphere and help attract and retain university talent.

Tarak Patel

Addiction center expands medical students' knowledge

June 18, 2019, Alyssa Yancey

Tarak Patel, a second-year medical student at the University of South Carolina School of Medicine Columbia, had witnessed the devastation of addiction while volunteering at hospitals and free clinics, but he only had a surface-level understanding of the complexities of the issue. That changed earlier this summer when Patel participated in the Summer Institute for Medical Students (SIMS) at the Hazelden Betty Ford Foundation in Center City, Minnesota.

Immigrant school children

Social workers play key role in immigrant students' success

June 18, 2019, Chris Horn

About one-quarter of children in the U.S. under the age of 18 are immigrants or the children of immigrants, a status that often translates into educational disadvantages. A College of Social Work faculty member is involved in surveying school social workers nationwide to learn what they are doing to help those children navigate successfully through their public school experiences.

Tarak Patel

Patient-centered approach deepens medical students' understanding of addiction

June 18, 2019, Alyssa Yancey

Tarak Patel, a second-year medical student at the University of South Carolina School of Medicine Columbia, had witnessed the devastation of addiction while volunteering at hospitals and free clinics, but he only had a surface-level understanding of the complexities of the issue. That changed earlier this summer when Patel participated in the Summer Institute for Medical Students (SIMS) at the Hazelden Betty Ford Foundation in Center City, Minnesota.

Portrait of Diane Wise

The Long Run: Diane Wise

June 13, 2019, Page Ivey

They arrived in the 1970s, some after serving in Vietnam, some fresh out of high school or college. More than 40 years later, they still come to work at the University of South Carolina — some after officially “retiring.” TIMES spoke with a few of these long-term employees to see what keeps them coming back to work on campus, long after they could have settled into that place in the mountains or that home by the sea.