Stories for Faculty and Staff

man in blue check shirt and blue jacket with trees in background

Education professor honored for his commitment to empowering teachers

April 07, 2021, Carol J.G. Ward

Most of Barnett Berry’s career has been about advancing what he calls the profession that makes all other professions possible – teaching. As a scholar and researcher, he is an advocate for teachers and how they can and must be more instrumental in the future of education. Berry is the 2021 recipient of the James A. Kelly Award for Advancing Accomplished Teaching.

Woman wearing a yellow scarf with blurred background

Education professor fights status quo to make schools more equitable

March 22, 2021, Carol J.G. Ward

For three and a half decades, University of South Carolina education professor Gloria Boutte has dedicated her work to creating school experiences that are more equitable for students of color. Her scholarship, teaching, leadership and service have been recognized with the 2021 Legacy Award from American Educational Research Association.

Social Justice Award winners

Three chosen as UofSC's 2021 Social Justice Award winners

January 11, 2021, Megan Sexton

An endowed chair in the School of Information Science, an associate professor of higher education who directs the university’s Museum of Education, and a Gamecock football player who proclaimed “’Matter’ is the Minimum” during last summer’s Black Lives Matter protests are the university’s 2021 Social Justice Awards winners.

Maxcy Monument on the Historic Horseshoe with sunlight streaming through the trees.
dawson tate

First-generation student learns what college is really like

November 03, 2020, Page Ivey

Growing up in Indian Land, South Carolina, Dawson Tate’s vision of college came mostly from what he saw in the movies. But during his time in the Opportunity Scholars Program at South Carolina, Tate has decided he likes what he sees and wants to continue his education through the doctorate level so he can return to his hometown and become a teacher and principal.

Painting of the late education philosopher Paulo Freire

Mass proliferation of online education is radically changing the face of education

October 07, 2020, James Kirylo

While online education is not new, its mass proliferation amid the pandemic is, and it’s radically changing the face of education. In The Conversation,College of Education professor James Kirylo writes about why we should consider what the late Brazilian educational philosopher Paulo Freire would have thought about the global normalization of virtual learning.

Unveiling of a statue of Richard T. Greener, the first Black professor at the University of South Carolina, in 2018.

What should replace Confederate statues?

August 18, 2020, Christian Anderson

This is a time when there is an intensified movement – particularly at America’s colleges and universities – to remove statues and names from buildings or organizations that pay homage to Confederate leaders and others with racist views. In The Conversation, education professor Christian Anderson examines the question of what – if anything – should be put up in their place.

instructor and students perform an experiment at a summer camp

Camp will highlight Gullah/Geechee culture to spark students' interest in science

August 17, 2020, Carol J.G. Ward

A summer camp for fifth- and sixth grade-students in South Carolina’s Gullah/Geechee community will introduce Gullah/Geechee students to STEM content from their own community and provide opportunities to interact with professionals who look like them, working in the fields of science, technology, engineering or mathematics.

John C. Calhoun statue is removed in Charleston, South Carolina

John C. Calhoun's days as a revered icon are gradually coming to an end

June 30, 2020, Christian Anderson

John C. Calhoun’s legacy until now has been quite prominent in American society – and not just in the South, but Calhoun’s days as a revered icon in the public sphere are gradually coming to an end. Education professor Christian Anderson addresses the issue of Calhoun’s legacy in The Conversation as we are in the midst of a nationwide reappraisal of our past that also affects UofSC.

students exercise with a ball

Kids need physical education - even when they can't get it at school

June 05, 2020, Collin Webster

Kids who are more physically active tend to get better grades and develop the self-confidence that can empower them to succeed later in life. Physical education professor Collin Webster writes for The Conversation that the arrival of summer vacation might allay concerns parents have about their children being too sedentary. However, researchers think a lack of structured summertime activities can cause kids to make unhealthy choices.

girl student taking a test

COVID 19 impact: Seeking alternatives to standardized testing

May 12, 2020, James Kirylo

Because of the COVID-19 epidemic, the Education Department is letting states cancel standardized tests. As a result, 2020 is the first year without federally mandated standardized testing in nearly two decades. Education professor James Kirylo writes in The Conversation that school systems can take advantage of this remarkable time to seek alternatives to standardized tests.

student working from home on a laptop

COVID-19 Impact: Education dean answers 4 questions about the upheaval

April 23, 2020, Jon Pedersen

Most of the school systems that shut their doors due to the COVID-19 outbreak initially said these closures would be temporary. But health authorities warn that Americans may need to keep up their social distancing for months. Jon Pedersen, dean of the University of South Carolina College of Education, answers some key questions about how this unprecedented situation might affect the education of millions of children.

AI Institute

Intelligence, all over campus

March 05, 2020, Megan Sexton

While artificial intelligence research and programs are growing around the country, the University of South Carolina’s AI Institute is among the first in the Southeast to include diverse colleges and departments.

daniella cook, aisha haynes, kyanna Samuel, spencer platt

2020 social justice award winners

January 09, 2020, Page Ivey

A community organizer and equity scholar, a three-degree alumna, an education student leader and a professor with a strong record of mentoring younger colleagues are the recipients of the University of South Carolina’s 2020 Social Justice Awards and will be honored at the annual MLK Commemorative Breakfast Jan. 17 in the Russell House Ballroom.

women's soccer celebrating with the SEC championship trophy
Kathy Carroll

Alumna takes reins as president of national school librarians association

November 11, 2019, Megan Sexton

School librarian Kathy Carroll likes to be in the middle of the action and that’s where she finds herself every day, whether it’s helping students at Westwood High School in Blythewood or advocating for her profession as president-elect of the American Association of School Librarians.

brick path near Gibbes Green

First-generation students, faculty and alumni reflect on their college experiences

November 05, 2019

Attending college is a transformative experience, offering students the opportunity to gain the knowledge, skills and experiences that lead them to a fuller life. We spoke to first-generation college students, faculty and alumni to learn about their experiences on campus and beyond.

A large Gamecock family smiles at the photographer while standing against the background of Williams-Brice Stadium in the distance

Family Weekend plays important role in student support

September 25, 2019, Annika Dahlgren

Family Weekend is part of the university’s wide-ranging commitment to delivering a superior student experience in a welcoming, inclusive environment. It helps to connect a student’s personal support network to the university experience, so that family members can feel engaged in a student’s journey — and a student can feel a deep level of support both on- and off-campus.

map of South Carolina with UofSC Alumnni mayor's cities pinned

Keys to the City

August 05, 2019, Craig Brandhorst and Megan Sexton

You don’t need a degree from the University of South Carolina to get elected mayor in the Palmetto State, but it certainly doesn’t hurt. This summer, Carolinian magazine traveled the state, from the Lowcountry to the Upstate, from the Midlands to the Pee Dee, interviewing South Carolina alumni who hold the esteemed office.

artificial intellingence illustration

Turning big data into smart data

May 29, 2019, Chris Horn

A new Artificial Intelligence Institute at the University of South Carolina will launch this summer, building on and harnessing the collective efforts of dozens of faculty members who already are advancing AI research initiatives in diverse academic disciplines.

Several people rallying outside of statehouse.

Using their 'teacher voices'

May 16, 2019, Page Ivey

On May 1, an estimated 10,000 South Carolina teachers and public education supporters rallied at the Statehouse in an event that showed teachers have been pushed to their limits and are willing to take their fight over working conditions to state lawmakers, says College of Education professor and researcher Jon Hale.

Mr. Gibson's fifth grade class

Culturally relevant teaching changes the game for students

May 13, 2019, Kathryn McPhail

Jackson Creek Elementary School, in Columbia, is committed to improving the way its teachers are educating students — both academically and socially. The school is collaborating with College of Education professors to offer all teachers and support staff ongoing professional development in culturally relevant teaching.