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Arnold School of Public Health

Instruments

Self-Report Measures - Physical Activity

Three Day Physical Activity Recall (3DPAR)
The Three Day Physical Activity Recall (3DPAR) is a self-report instrument based on the Previous Day Physical Activity Recall (PDPAR) and is designed to capture habitual physical activity of adolescents. 3DPAR uses a time-based recall approach over a three-day period. Each day is divided into 34 blocks of time (representing 30 minutes per block) from 7:00am to midnight. Adolescents are asked to record their specific activity (59 common activities are listed for them to select from, each with a numeric code) and the intensity of the activity for each block of time. Physical activity is then determined using the metabolic equivalent (MET) levels. The instrument can be completed during a single 30-45 minute session, making it ideal for school-based data collection.

Previous Day Physical Activity Recall (PDPAR)
Previous Day Physical Activity Recall (PDPAR) is a self-report instrument intended to capture the previous day's physical activity of children, specifically after school hours. The PDPAR uses a time-based recall approach by asking the child to recall and record their physical activity from the previous day between 3:00pm and 11:30pm. The time between 3:00pm and 11:30pm is divided into 17 blocks, 30 minutes each. Children are asked to note their specific activity (35 common activities are listed for the child to choose from, each with a numerical code) and the intensity of the activity (very light, light, moderate, or vigorous) per block of time. The physical activity of the child is then determined using the metabolic equivalent, or MET, level.


Objective Measures - Physical Activity

Observation System for Recording Physical Activity in Children (OSRAC)
The Observation System for Recording Physical Activity in Children (OSRAC) is a direct observation system for observing children’s physical activity and its associated physical and social contexts. There are 3 versions of the OSRAC for use in the preschool (OSRAC-P), the home (OSRAC-H) and the elementary school (OSRAC-E) environments. Each version utilizes the same activity level codes (intensity) for comparability across age groups and settings. The OSRAC-P contains categories and codes specific to indoor and outdoor contexts commonly seen in preschools. The OSRAC-H was developed to capture the indoor and outdoor contexts typically seen at home, as well as parent and sibling engagement, and media use. The OSRAC-E contains categories and codes for K-5th grade students and includes both school setting (physical location in the school) and instructional setting categories as well as the context of activity. The OSRAC battery of systems provides researchers with feasible and reliable tools for observing the physical activity of children in a variety of settings.


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